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f the column devolved upon the forces under Col. Gordon. The guard having been separated from thline was occupied by the Third brigade, Col. Geo. H. Gordon commanding. The regiments were stronglto commend the conduct of Col. Donnelly and Col. Gordon, commanding the two brigades. I would alsoMajor-General Commanding. Report of Brig.-General Gordon. headquarters Third brigade, camp p at Williamsport, Md., May 26, 1862. Colonel George H. Gordon, Commanding Third Brigade: sir: I Our forces, Donnelly's brigade on the left and Gordon's upon the right, were in position along a gorttack, cut traces, tipped wagons over, etc. Col. Gordon, with the Second Massachusetts, the Twenty- left of the road going out of Winchester. Col. Gordon placed his on a ridge on the right of the rlly's forces maintained their ground well. Col. Gordon's, which was on higher ground, and held theavy masses; were moving to flank our right, Col. Gordon ordered the Twenty-seventh Indiana and Twen[11 more...]
n regiment, Col. Woodbury, was sent to feel them, and, if necessary, interrupt their quiet. The regiment left camp at seven A. M., their Colonel at their head, and all in splendid spirits at the prospect of a rencontre with the rebels. A secondary object of the expedition was to obtain information in regard to the roads and fords in the vicinity. Lieut. N. Bowen, of the Topographical Engineers, went with the expedition, as also a squadron of the Second regular cavalry, under command of Capt. Gordon; a company of the Fifth cavalry, Lieut. Coster; a company of the Eighteenth infantry, Capt. Forsyth, and a company of the Second infantry, Capt. McMillen. New-Bridge is four miles from the camp. They went down the main road about two miles, to what is called the Old Mill, and thence turned to the right through a piece of woods, keeping it till they came to an open field, commanding a view of the Chickahominy River. A portion of company A, Fourth Michigan regiment, Capt. Rose, was here
d the advance of Gen. Banks--the brigade of Gen. Gordon being directed to change their position froia Campaign. Major-General Commanding. General Gordon's official report. headquarters Thirdh great respect, truly your ob't servant, Geo. H. Gordon, Brigadier-General Commanding Third Brigaear slaughter's Mt., Aug. 11, 1862. Brig.-Gen. Geo. H. Gordon, Commanding Third Brigade: In comivisions of infantry, including Crawford's and Gordon's brigades, made three most desperate bayonet-tood next, then Generals Geary, Crawford, and Gordon. Just after Gen. Green had taken his position ntain. The brigade of Generals Crawford and Gordon, occupying the extreme right, and fighting neais corps famous. Gens. Geary, Augur, Carroll, Gordon and Green behaved with distinguished gallantryto the right. Order it forward! Crawford and Gordon are coming up. Tell them to carry those woods idered dangerous. The same may be said of Colonel Gordon's and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot's of Si[5 more...]
forward, and occupied the advance of Gen. Banks--the brigade of Gen. Gordon being directed to change their position from the right, and mass report of his Virginia Campaign. Major-General Commanding. General Gordon's official report. headquarters Third brigade, in the fielre. I am, sir, with great respect, truly your ob't servant, Geo. H. Gordon, Brigadier-General Commanding Third Brigade, First Division, Ss. Volunteers, camp near slaughter's Mt., Aug. 11, 1862. Brig.-Gen. Geo. H. Gordon, Commanding Third Brigade: In compliance with orders fur's and Williams's divisions of infantry, including Crawford's and Gordon's brigades, made three most desperate bayonet-charges upon the rebe left. Gen. Prince stood next, then Generals Geary, Crawford, and Gordon. Just after Gen. Green had taken his position on the left, and at n called Slaughter Mountain. The brigade of Generals Crawford and Gordon, occupying the extreme right, and fighting nearly all the time in t
lantry, and sustained the heaviest losses, but the conduct of the whole corps of General Banks was beyond all praise. Although I regret that General Banks thought it expedient to depart from my instructions, it gives me pleasure to bear testimony to his gallant and intrepid conduct throughout that action. He exposed himself as freely as any one under his command, and his example went far to secure that gallant and noble conduct which has made his corps famous. Gens. Geary, Augur, Carroll, Gordon and Green behaved with distinguished gallantry. Gen. Prince, who had led his brigade throughout the action with coolness and courage, was captured after dark while passing from one flank of his command to the other. As I have not received any report from Gen. Banks, it is not in my power to mention the field and company officers who distinguished themselves under his immediate eye in this action; but as soon as his report is received, I will transmit it to the Government, and endeavor to d
e a second time victorious, Gen. Hooker determined to advance. Orders were sent to Crawford and Gordon — the two Mansfield brigades — to move forward at once, the batteries in the centre were orderedn his seat to look about him. There is a regiment to the right. Order it forward! Crawford and Gordon are coming up. Tell them to carry those woods and hold them — and it is our fight! It was fouarge part of his command was broken, but with his right still untouched, and with Crawford's and Gordon's brigades just up; above all, with the advance of the whole central line, which the men had hea such a battle? Sumner arrived just as Hooker was leaving, and assumed command. Crawford and Gordon had gone into the woods, and were holding them stoutly against heavy odds. As I rode over towarets were thickest. Sedgwick's division was in advance, moving forward to support Crawford and Gordon. Rebel reinforcements were approaching also, and the struggle for the roads was again to be ren<
ral Wright, of Georgia, in leg; General Ripley, of South-Carolina, in throat; Colonel Duncan McRea, who succeeded Ripley in command, slightly; Colonel Magill, of Georgia regulars, lost an arm; Majors Sorrell and Walton, of Longstreet's staff; Colonel Gordon and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot, of the Sixth Alabama, Captain Reedy, of the Third Alabama, (wounded and missing at Boonesboro Gap;) Colonel Alfred Cumming, of the Tenth Georgia; Major Tracy, badly, and Captain Watson, of the Sixth Georgia; ff; Major Harris, of Twentieth Georgia; and Colonel William Smith, (late Governor, and known as Extra Billy Smith,) of Virginia, badly. Gens. Lawton's and Wright's wounds, though severe, are not considered dangerous. The same may be said of Colonel Gordon's and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot's of Sixth Alabama; Major-General Anderson's, Brigadier-General Anderson's, and Brigadier-General Ripley's. I have omitted to mention, in the proper place, that Major Robert S. Smith and Lieutenant Lewis
illiant affairs with Stevenson's division in entire force. The enemy outnumbered DeCourcey four to one. The enemy lost two hundred and twenty-five, and Lieut.-Colonel Gordon, of the Eleventh Tennessee, was taken prisoner. We captured two hundred wagon-loads of forage, twelve hundred pounds of tobacco, and thirty horses and multy-seven men of Edgar's and Tannehill's companies of the Sixteenth Ohio, who were cut off before they could fall back from picket-duty, on the main body. Lieut.-Col. Gordon, of the Eleventh rebel Tennessee regiment, was taken prisoner by two men of the Sixteenth Ohio, and though their company was completely surrounded, they dexheir disordered column as they put out in a double-quick for the Gap. Forty prisoners were captured, a good many stand of arms, and some commissary stores. Lieut.-Col. Gordon, of the Eleventh Tennessee regiment, (Col. Hains,) was captured by the enemy. I cannot call this a battle, as it does not come up to my idea of what a ba