Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. B. Gordon or search for J. B. Gordon in all documents.

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' Mills, and rendezvous in the neighborhood of Gordon in seven days, exclusive of the day of march. nerals Howard and Kilpatrick were in and about Gordon. General Howard was then ordered to move ea, with numerous breaks on the latter road from Gordon to Eatonton, and from Millen to Augusta, and t November 20, 1864. The command moved on Gordon in two columns, General Kilpatrick, with his c. General Blair continued his march direct on Gordon, reaching that place with his leading divisionision of General G. A. Smith, however, reached Gordon on the twenty-first. November 22, 1864. The troops and trains were closed up toward Gordon, excepting General Woods's division, who was direNovember twenty-third, my command marched from Gordon in two columns, the Fifteenth corps via Irwintins, that were this day moving from Clinton to Gordon. November 24. My command marched to Millned. The railroad track for five miles toward Gordon was destroyed. On the twenty-fourth, the ma[2 more...]
November 20, 1864. The command moved on Gordon in two columns, General Kilpatrick, with his cavalry, taking the Clinton road and the river-road toward Macon. General Osterhaus, with the bridge-train, cavalry-train, etc., moved toward Clinton; General Blair, with his command, via Bluntsville. The head of the right column encamped at Clinton, and the left near Fortsville. General Kilpatrick waited at Clinton until the arrival of the head of the column at twelve M., when he moved out toward Macon, on the left Macon road. He met the enemy's cavalry about four miles from Macon, drove them in, and charged their works, defended by infantry and artillery. The head of his column got inside the works, but could not hold them. He succeeded in reaching the railroad, and destroyed about one mile of the track. The road was struck in two or three places by the cavalry, beside the above, and a train of cars burned. It rained hard during the entire night.
November 21, 1864. The cavalry took up an advance position covering all roads debouching from Macon. General Blair continued his march direct on Gordon, reaching that place with his leading division. The right column was subdivided; two divisions, with small trains, taking the road toward Irwinton, and the rest, with headqurd Irwinton, and the rest, with headquarters, bridge-train, cattle, etc., moving on the direct Gordon road. The centre and left column met at a point, six miles from Gordon, called Pitt's Mill, where the centre made a parallel road into Gordon. Only the division of General G. A. Smith, however, reached Gordon on the twenty-first.rd Irwinton, and the rest, with headquarters, bridge-train, cattle, etc., moving on the direct Gordon road. The centre and left column met at a point, six miles from Gordon, called Pitt's Mill, where the centre made a parallel road into Gordon. Only the division of General G. A. Smith, however, reached Gordon on the twenty-first.
November 22, 1864. The troops and trains were closed up toward Gordon, excepting General Woods's division, who was directed to take up a strong position on the Irwinton road, and make a demonstration toward Macon. The demonstration was made by General Walcott's brigade, in conjunction with the cavalry on the different roads. The rebel cavalry, in force, made a charge early in the morning, capturing one of our cavalry picket-posts, estimated forty-five men killed, wounded, and missing. Quite a little action grew out of it, in which there was charging and counter-charging of cavalry, when, finally, the enemy were driven from the field in confusion, Walcott's infantry, skirmishing, lending a hand. In the afternoon, Walcott had taken up a position, two miles in advance of his division, to-ward Macon, having two pieces of artillery, and had thrown up rail barricades, when he was attacked by quite a large body of infantry, accompanied by some artillery-probably a battery of four
November 22. Wheeler advanced with his entire corps of cavalry and three (3) brigades of infantry, drove in my pickets and skirmish line, but was finally checked and driven back by the Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry (Colonel Jordon) and Fifth Kentucky cavalry, (Colonel Baldwin,) the sabre being principally used. General Wolcott with his infantry now came up, and the enemy was driven by him beyond Griswold Station. The same day Colonel Atkins (Second brigade) had some severe fighting on the Macon and Milledgeville road, and effectually prevented any attack upon our trains, that were this day moving from Clinton to Gordon.
divisions were encamped on the east side of the Oconee, and the Third division on the west side, near the bridge. Large quantities of arms, ammunition, and accoutrements were found and destroyed, as well as salt and other public property. The report of Colonel Hawley, commander of post, forwarded herewith, will give the details of this property. The railroad depot, two arsenals, a powder magazine, and other public buildings and shops were burned. The railroad track for five miles toward Gordon was destroyed. On the twenty-fourth, the march was resumed, and the divisions encamped near Gum Creek; and on the twenty-fifth, after some delay, to rebuild the bridges over Buffalo Creek and Swamp, the head of the column encamped about seven miles from Sandersville. Some skirmishing was had, and the enemy's cavalry was driven away by Colonel Robinson's brigade just as we were going into camp. On the following morning, (twenty-sixth,) two regiments of Carman's brigade, Jackson's divis
e, 2 1/2 miles; between Social Circle and Madison, 1 mile; between Madison and Oconee, 5 miles; between Milledgeville and Gordon, 2 miles; between Tennille and Davisboro, 9 miles; total, 26 1/2 miles. Railroad bridges across the Oconee and Ocmulge. The regiment went with the rest of the brigade in the afternoon, for the purpose of destroying the railroad running to Gordon, on the Macon Railroad. Worked until dark and returned to the camp, this regiment having thoroughly destroyed about three corps and train, taking a different but converging road, halted for the night at Blue Springs, on the plantation of General Gordon. At this point the command was turned out, to destroy the Augusta Railroad, which was effectually accomplished for sles. A large amount of cotton (one hundred and fifty (150) bales) and corn, ready for shipment, on the plantation of General Gordon, was destroyed by fire, by order of General Geary, commanding the division. 20th. Broke camp at seven A. M., this
e twenty-first, at Griffin, covering the rear on withdrawing toward Gordon. On the morning of the twenty-second, shortly after daylight, the gement he deserves much praise. From Griswold we marched through Gordon to Milledgeville, and thence toward Waynesboro. On the morning of rks at that place; one battalion of the Eighth dismounted, under Major Gordon, charged and quickly carried the works. This was followed by a n which we were not engaged, occurred. In the evening moved toward Gordon, camping four (4) miles from that place. The next evening we were d, when we moved out and encamped near Gordon. Remained in camp at Gordon most of the next day. On the twenty-fourth, we arrived at Milledgev night. 22d. Marched at nine A. M., and encamped six miles from Gordon. 23d. Moved three miles nearer Gordon and encamped, the Fifth OGordon and encamped, the Fifth Ohio volunteer cavalry picketing Jones's Cross-Roads. 24th. Marched at seven A. M.; passed through Milledgeville, and encamped eight miles
. M., regiment rearguard. As we passed the mills of Mr. Denham, they were burning splendidly. Bivouacked at dark, till 22d. Marched at seven A. M., and rejoined the corps at twelve M. Sighted Milledgeville at four P. M., and passed through the capital city at eight P. M. Crossed the Oconee River, and bivouacked one mile east of the city at eleven P. M. 23d. Remained in camp till one P. M., when regiment and brigade, with one brigade of the First division, went out three miles toward Gordon, and destroyed railroad track. Returned to camp at seven P. M. 24th. Seven A. M., marched into the main road, and halted until the Fourteenth corps passed. Resumed march, and bivouacked at dark one mile south-east of Town Creek. 25th. Marched nine A. M., as far as Buffalo Creek Swamp. Remained until nine bridges, destroyed by rebels, were rebuilt across the swamp. At eight P. M., moved across, and bivouacked at half-past 9 P. M. 26th. Marched at seven A. M., the regiment guar
lves unsupported, the men were required by Colonel Gordon to lie down; and finally, no support arriv of the hill, but soon retreated in disorder. Gordon, commanding Rodes's brigade, pushed gallantly lves unsupported, the men were required by Colonel Gordon to lie down; and finally, no support arrivto turn over the command of the brigade to Colonel Gordon, of the Sixth Alabama. I desire to call e Assistant Adjutant-General. Report of Colonel Gordon. headquarters First brigade, Third diespectfully, Major, your obedient servant, J. B. Gordon, Colonel, commanding Rodes's brigade    4251027  Respectfully submitted, J. B. Gordon, Colonel, commanding brigade. Report oto move forward at once and attack the enemy. Gordon's and Anderson's brigades were on my right, an. Anderson's, Ripley's, and Rodes's brigades (Gordon commanding) had proceeded farther down the road. As night closed in, General Ripley, Colonels Gordon and Colquitt, (commanding brigades,) and
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