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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 211 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 211 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 156 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 152 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 135 3 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 98 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 70 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 66 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 63 1 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 63 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for John B. Gordon or search for John B. Gordon in all documents.

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and swapping between the pickets and between the lines became so prevalent before the war closed as to cause no comment and attract no special attention. General John B. Gordon declares, I should, perhaps, not exaggerate the number or importance of these evidences if I said that there were thousands of them which are perhaps the The most conspicuous Southern leader in the progress of nationalization was Henry W. Grady, of Georgia. His father, a Confederate soldier on the staff of General Gordon, met his death at Petersburg in the attack on Fort Stedman only two weeks before the surrender at Appomattox. Yet the son looked back on the conflict with nohe Confederate armies on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the great battle. Some three thousand old soldiers were in attendance. The well-known Georgian, General John B. Gordon, delivered an earnest and eloquent address. The New Englander, George William Curtis, followed him. One who was present reports that his tribute to Confe
against the brick wall. The photograph is proof of the friendly relations existing between the two armies encamped on opposite banks of the Rappahannock. Men in gray, both officer and private, are actually posing before the Federal camera. General Gordon says: ‘This rollicking sort of intercourse would have been alarming in its intimacy, but for the perfect confidence which the officers of both sides had in their men. Even officers on the opposite banks of this narrow stream would now and theded, and sent back with Yankee coffee for the Confederates.’ He then tells of finding a Union soldier lying in the weeds, who said that he came across the river see the Johnnies for a little while, since there was no battle in progress. When General Gordon threatened to send the scantily clad visitor to prison, his own soldiers protested so stoutly that he allowed the ‘Yank’ to swim back to his camp. As fades the iris after rain In April's tearful weather, The vision vanished, as the strain A