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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 211 7 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 211 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 156 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 152 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 135 3 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 98 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 70 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 66 2 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 63 5 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 63 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John B. Gordon or search for John B. Gordon in all documents.

Your search returned 28 results in 12 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Expedition into Maryland-battle of Monocacy and advance on Washington. (search)
d in northern accounts at 10,000, and consisting, in part, of the Third division of the Sixth corps, under Ricketts, which had arrived the day before. This force we attacked on the afternoon of the same day, Ramseur demonstrating in front, while Gordon moved across the Monocacy, on the enemy's flank, by a route which had been opened by McCausland's brigade of cavalry in a very gallant manner. The enemy in a very short time was completely routed by Gordon, and left the field in great disorder aGordon, and left the field in great disorder and retreated in haste on Baltimore. In this action our entire loss was between six and seven hundred, including the cavalry; but I regret to say Brigadier-General Evans was wounded and some gallant officers killed. On the morning of the 10th I moved towards Washington, taking the route by Rockville, and then turning to the left to get on the Seventh-street pike. The day was very hot and the roads exceedingly dusty, but we marched thirty miles. On the morning of the 11th we continued the m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Hatcher's Run-telegram from General Lee. (search)
ntry, with Gregg's cavalry, crossed and proceeded on the Vaughan road — the infantry to Cattail creek, the cavalry to Dinwiddie Court-house, where its advance encountered a portion of our cavalry and retired. In the afternoon parts of Hill's and Gordon's troops demonstrated against the enemy on the left of Hatcher's Run, near Armstrong's mill. Finding him entrenched, they were withdrawn after dark. During the night the force that had advanced beyond the creek returned to it, and were reportedtinately contested several hours, but General Pegram being killed while bravely encouraging his men, and Colonel Hoffman wounded, some confusion occurred and the division was pressed back to its original position. Evan's division, ordered by General Gordon to support Pegram's, charged the enemy and forced him back, but was in turn compelled to retire. Mahone's division arriving, enemy was driven rapidly to his defenses on Hatcher's Run. Our loss is reported to be small, that of the enemy not
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
Northern Virginia, from Harper's Ferry, in 1861, to Appomattox Court-house, in 1865. Entering the service as high private in the rear rank, and afterward acting as chaplain in both Stonewall Jackson's and A. P. Hill's corps, I had some peculiar facilities for seeing and knowing what occurred. Personally acquainted with Robert E. Lee, J. E. Johnston, Beaureguard, Jackson, Stuart, Ewell, A. P. Hill, Early, Edward Johnson, Rodes, Pender, Heth, Wilcox, Hampton, Fitzhugh Lee, W. H. F. Lee, John B. Gordon, Pegram, J. A. Walker, and a large number of others of our leading officers, I at the same time made it my duty to know thoroughly the unknown private of the rank and file. I marched with him along the weary road; I bivouaced with him in the pelting storm; I shared with him the rough delights of the camp; I joined with him in those delightful services which proved that Jesus was often in the army with a power rarely witnessed at home. I went with him into the leaden and iron hail of ba
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stuart's last dispatch. (search)
sink bridge, May 11th, 3 o'clock P. M., 1864. To General Bragg: General,--The enemy now has the Yellow Tavern and hold the Old Mountain road for some distance above, having formed his column between Fredericksburg railroad and that road. General Gordon is one-and-a-half miles south of Chiles's Tavern, on that road, and informs me that all the enemy's cavalry are massed here, none having gone towards James river. Now, General, if we can make a combined attack on them with Hunton's brigade I cannot see how they can escape. I have attacked once and feel confident of success. They drove our extreme left back a little, but we have been driving their rear and left. As soon as Gordon joins my right I will try them again, and expect to get so as to command the intersection. There is a road, however, coming in just by Delaplaine's, in sight of Yellow Tavern, from which the enemy can move towards Meadow bridge, which, however, I hear is burned. I keep my artillery bearing on a dust ne
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of the artillery of the army of Western Louisiana, after the battle of Pleasant Hill. (search)
d to the 8th May inclusive, Captain Mosely, with his battery, reporting to Brigadier-General Steele, was engaged in many affairs with the enemy on Bayou Rapides. On the 5th and 7th, at Middle Bayou, Graham's and Long's, he was of efficient service in checking advances of the enemy made in great force. On the 6th and 7th, Captain H. C. West, with his battery, also reported to Brigadier-General Steele. On the 7th, Mosely's and West's batteries covered the withdrawal of our forces over Gordon's bridge, driving back the enemy, when they pressed on too rapidly, and delivering some rounds of canister. On the 5th May, Captain Benton, reporting to Brigadier-General Bee, after a night march of twenty-two miles, engaged the advance of the enemy at Polk's plantation, and punished him severely. He held one position with sufficient tenacity to enable him to fire canister upon the advancing enemy. On the 6th May his battery covered the crossing of the cavalry when driven over Polk's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The advance on Washington in 1864. (search)
detached, and is as follows: Breckinridge's division (total effective)2,104 Rodes's division (total effective)3,013 Gordon's division (total effective)2,544 Ramseur's division (total effective)1,909   Aggregate9,570 The strength of the antry regiments and battalions at seventy-four, and in this I am credited with some commands that were not with me. In Gordon's division, which was formed by taking two of the brigades from my division and uniting them with the remnant of Johnson's division, after the disaster of the 12th of May, to form a division for Gordon, there were thirty regiments. Giving 180 to each regiment would make an aggregate of 5,400 for the division. In one of the brigades in his division there were the remnirginia regiments in Johnson's division. An average of 180 for those regiments would give 2,340 for the brigade, and yet Gordon's whole division numbered, on the 31st of August, 1864, only 2,544, as shown by the returns of that date. On the same ci
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
er, yet, if anything was to be attempted, here seemed to be the occasion. Riding forward to select a position for the artillery, we had gone but a short distance when, to our surprise and mortification, we found ourselves in the presence of Generals Gordon and Custar, surrounded by a large staff. A glance told the story. The firing was still going on, especially on the left. So soon as recognized by General Gordon, I was ordered to cause the firing to cease. I directed Adjutant Grattan to General Gordon, I was ordered to cause the firing to cease. I directed Adjutant Grattan to go to the right while I went to the left, and ascending a hill found Johnson's battery, commanded, as before stated, by Captain Wright, actively engaged, and when the order was given to cease firing the question came from many anxious, trembling lips, What for? What's the matter? The reply sent a pang of anguish to every heart too deep for utterance. With the last deep-toned and defiant sound sent forth by this brave Richmond battery, the great heart of the noble Army of Northern Virginia had
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 10.92 (search)
heights north of the river. Guns were again used with effect a mile or two farther on, when General Gordon (then commanding Second corps), with the justly honored General A. L. Long, his Chief of Arthose serving under General Lee's appointment were, General Longstreet, Chief of First Corps, General Gordon, Chief of Second Corps, and the General Chief of Artillery. In accordance with stipulationsbout 3 o'clock on the morning of the 9th of April, 1865, the Second corps, then commanded by General Gordon, advanced on the road to Appomattox Station, it was thought, to drive back a portion of the Our advance was soon arrested by the appearance of heavy columns of the enemy's infantry. General Gordon, being unable to obtain adequate reinforcements, was compelled to fall back towards the Courim. While this cannonade was in progress I received a message, through a staff officer of General Gordon's, to cease firing as a flag of truce had been sent to the enemy. I immediately sent to the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
hings stated as they actually occurred, if they are stated at all. And without meaning for a moment to intimate that Major P. would have it otherwise, I think the following statement will be corroborated by every man who was within hearing of General Gordon's voice when he gathered around him that Sunday afternoon the torn and battle-scarred remnant of that noble body of men (the Second corps) who had followed Jackson, Ewell, Early and himself through such trying scenes, to make to them a fareweparade ground, meaning this last to apply to Griffin's battery, which was stationed just in the village; and if any artillery was fired after this battery ceased firing the sound was not heard within a mile of Appomattox Courthouse, or within General Gordon's hearing. Respectfully, N. B. Johnston. What Infantry Regiment accompanied General Stuart to Ely's Ford the night Jackson was wounded at Chancellorsville? The following letter from our friend, Major H. B. McClellan, explains itsel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade (search)
from them, I never heard. I only know that no one at our headquarters could understand their foreign gibberish. After Gordon's attack, the enemy sweep our skirmish line. When General Gordon attacked Fort Steadman, General Wilcox was sick, and General Gordon attacked Fort Steadman, General Wilcox was sick, and I commanded his division. I was ordered about dark to report to General Gordon, in Petersburg, with my own and another brigade. General Gordon ordered us to Lieutenant Run, on the road leading to the Jerusalem Plank-road, not far from the ruins of General Gordon, in Petersburg, with my own and another brigade. General Gordon ordered us to Lieutenant Run, on the road leading to the Jerusalem Plank-road, not far from the ruins of the Ragland House, (I think that was the name,) and there await further orders. We were not taken into action; but, some time after the repulse, were ordered back to our winter quarters. Just as we reached our camp, the enemy threw forward a veryGeneral Gordon ordered us to Lieutenant Run, on the road leading to the Jerusalem Plank-road, not far from the ruins of the Ragland House, (I think that was the name,) and there await further orders. We were not taken into action; but, some time after the repulse, were ordered back to our winter quarters. Just as we reached our camp, the enemy threw forward a very strong force, and swept the entire Confederate picket line from Hatcher's Run to Lieutenant Run, and it was feared they would attack our weak line of battle. Our artillery opened, and the fighting continued throughout the day. About dark we succeed
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