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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 211 7 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 211 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 156 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 152 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 135 3 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 98 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 70 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 66 2 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 63 5 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 63 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for John B. Gordon or search for John B. Gordon in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 3 document sections:

then marching through Maryland to Gettysburg. Hays' brigade was camped peacefully near the historic Pennsylvania village on the 26th. Ewell then advanced, with Gordon in the van, to York, near the Susquehanna river and the capital of Pennsylvania, 75 miles north of Washington. Johnson's division crossed at Boteler's ford and and compelled it to give up the strong position occupied during the next two days by Hill and Longstreet. Hays' brigade, said Early, advanced toward the town on Gordon's left in fine style, encountering and driving back into the town in great confusion the second line of the enemy, until the Louisianians formed in line in the stmore loss than success. As soon as Johnson was engaged Early ordered forward his assaulting line, Hays on the right, Avery's North Carolinians on the left, and Gordon supporting, against Cemetery hill. It was a little before 8 p. m. and the darkness was some screen to their movement; but the enemy's artillery was in furious ac
son's division, in which the Louisianians still maintained the forms of their brigade organizations, was coupled with John B. Gordon's brigade to form a division afterward led by that gallant Georgian. With Thor's hammer; with his tremendous prepoilliant battle Col. W. R. Peck, of the Ninth, commanding Hays' brigade, earned by his admirable conduct the praise of General Gordon. Among the killed and wounded Louisianians, for this last time left on the north of the Potomac, was Lieutenant-Colonder Colonel Peck, marched out to where the Federals were pushing their fortified line westward at Hatcher's run. Part of Gordon's division, under Gen. C. A. Evans, they moved to the support of Pegram, and on the same day were engaged in skirmishing,djutant of the division corps of sharpshooters, a brave soldier and good officer, lost his life that day. March 25th, Gordon's corps, sent to the other wing of the Confederate works about Petersburg, sought by a gallant night attack to break the
lashed through the armies, not yet quite through with fighting here and there. Gordon and Sheridan had passed the forenoon in filling the air of Appomattox with nois M. Owen had been ordered with his guns to report at the Brown house, where General Gordon was. Gordon said: Major, you are from Louisiana; I will send you the LouisGordon said: Major, you are from Louisiana; I will send you the Louisiana brigade to support your guns. Naturally the fittest support of a Louisiana battery would be Louisiana infantry. Now, through the pines the Louisiana brigade cohe Louisiana brigade which had contained them all! To this same brigade, under Gordon's command, fell the signal honor of making the last infantry charge at Appomatt of enemies, they stemmed with their weakness the assaults so successfully that Gordon, in calling them back from the slaughter, complimented them upon the courage diized for purposes strictly social, literary, historical and benevolent. Gen. John B. Gordon, of Georgia, who was the first commander of the new organization, is sti