hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 211 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 211 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 156 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 152 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 135 3 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 98 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 70 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 66 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 63 1 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 63 5 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John B. Gordon or search for John B. Gordon in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
refer to that organization. Lieutenant-General Jubal A. Early Commanding. Gordon's division. Major-General John B. Gordon. Hays's brigade. constitutingMajor-General John B. Gordon. Hays's brigade. constituting York's brigade. Fifth Louisiana, Colonel Henry Forno. Sixth Louisiana, Colonel William Monaghan. Seventh Louisiana, Colonel D. B. Penn. Eighth Louisiana, Colonel A. DeBlanc. Ninth Louisiana, Colonel William R. Peck. Gordon's brigade. Evans's brigade, Colonel E. N. Atkinson commanding, and containing Twelfth Georgn. Stonewall brigade. the Virginia regiments constituted Terry's brigade, Gordon's division. Second Virginia, Colonel J. Q. A. Nadenbousch. Fourth Virginia,y. Steuart's brigade. the Virginia regiments constituted Terry's brigade, Gordon's division. Tenth Virginia, Colonel E. T. H. Warren. Twenty-third Virginia,ton. Jones's brigade. the Virginia regiments constituted Terry's brigade, Gordon's division. Twenty-first Virginia, Colonel W. A. Witcher. Twenty-fifth Virg
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the Eclectic history of the United States a proper book to use in our schools? (search)
acher in one of the best academies in Virginia. For some years after the war one of the accomplished professors whom General Lee called around him to make Washington College an institution of such high grade, and for several years the able and efficient head of McDonogh Institute, Colonel Allan stands in the very forefront of practical teachers, and his opinions about text-books are of highest value. Serving on the staff of General Stonewall Jackson, General Ewell, General Early, and General Gordon, Colonel Allan has added to his personal knowledge of the events of the war, a most careful study of official documents and reliable statements on both sides, and has won a wide reputation as a painstaking, accurate, and able military critic. His paper is, therefore, of highest authority, and we give it in full (as a brief and general statement of the character of this book) before going into our own more detailed citation of its errrors. The Eclectic history of the United States,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
ery truly yours, U. S. Grant. It should be added to General Grant's honor that the above letter was written amidst his severe pecuniary troubles, and that he had previously contributed five hundred dollars ($500) to the fund. From General John B. Gordon. New York, May 10, 1884. Hon. Peyton Wise, Chairman: my Dear Sir,—you will understand how grateful to my sensibilities are the contents of your letter of May 5th, and how gladly I should accept the invitation of the committee and yourske part in the pleasing and imposing ceremonies at the opening of the Fair. My whole heart is in this cause, but I must deny myself the pleasure of being with you bodily on the 14th. I shall be there, however, in spirit. Sincerely yours, J. B. Gordon. It may be proper to say to our friends everywhere that this effort to establish a Confederate Home on a proper foundation will need large sums in addition to what we may be able to realize from the Fair; that additional contributions wil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Sherman's march from Atlanta to the coast-address before the survivors' Association of Augusta, Ga., April 20th, 1884. (search)
direction of Jonesboro and McDonough, with orders to make a strong feint on Macon, cross the Ocmulgee about Planter's Mills, and rendezvous in the neighborhood of Gordon in seven days, exclusive of the day of march. The same day General Slocum moved with the Twentieth Corps by Decatur and Stone Mountain, with instructions to tear By the 23d General Slocum was occupying Milledgeville and the bridge across the Oconee, and Generals Howard and Kilpatrick had massed their troops in and around Gordon. Promptly advised by Major-General Wheeler of the Federal movement, General Beauregard, then in command of the military division of the West, ordered a concentm Atlanta to the sea, and I will, my friends, trespass no longer upon your patience. After alluding to the almost total demolition of the Central Railroad from Gordon to Savannah, and the partial destruction of the Macon and Western, the Augusta and Waynesboro, the Charleston and Savannah, and the Atlantic and Gulf Railways, Ge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 73 (search)
de. Brigadier-General W. R. Cox. First North Carolina. Second North Carolina. Third North Carolina. Fourth North Carolina. Fourteenth North Carolina. Thirtieth North Carolina. Cook's brigade. Brigadier-General Phil. Cook. Fourth Georgia. Twelfth Georgia. Twenty-first Georgia. Forty-fourth Georgia. Battle's brigade. Brigadier-General C. A. Battle. Third Alabama. Fifth Alabama. Sixth Alabama. Twelfth Alabama. Sixty-first Alabama. Gordons division. Major-General John B. Gordon. Hays' brigade. these brigades united under command of Brigadier-General Zebulon York. Colonel William Monaghan. Fifth Louisiana, Major A. Hart. Sixth Louisiana, Lieutenant-Colonel J. Hanlon. Seventh Louisiana, Lieutenant-Colonel T. M. Terry. Eighth Louisiana, Captain L. Prados. Ninth Louisiana, Colonel William R. Peck. Stafford's brigade. these brigades united under command of Brigadier-General Zebulon York. Colonel Eugene Waggaman. First Louisiana, Captai
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Fitzhugh Lee of the operations of the cavalry corps A. N. V. (search)
anding General. Upon arriving at his headquarters I found General Longstreet there, and we were soon after joined by General Gordon. The condition of our situation was explained by the Commanding General to us as the commanders of his three corps, us. It was decided that I should attack the enemy's cavalry at daylight, then reported as obstructing our further march. Gordon was to support me, and in case nothing but cavalry were discovered, we were to clear it from our route and open a way ford earlier than our main advance, in consequence of our march being retarded by our wagon trains. At daybreak on the 9th, Gordon's command, numbering about 1,600 muskets, was formed in line of battle half mile west of Appomattox Courthouse, on the Lynot avail myself of a cessation of hostilities pending the existence of a flag of truce. I had an understanding with General Gordon that he should communicate to you the information of the presence of the enemy's infantry upon the road in our front.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 95 (search)
old battery, and taken by General Fitz Lee across the Red Bud Creek to relieve the heavy pressure upon a part of General Bradley Johnson's cavalry, then skirmishing with the enemy. Johnson's troops were on the left of Evans' infantry brigade of Gordon's division. We were dismounted, and became engaged very quickly; but a few well-directed shots from our horse artillery cleared our immediate front—General Fitz. Lee taking command of the whole line, Wickham of the division, I had the brigade. eral Early was now expecting reinforcements. Fight at Waynesboroa. On the 28th they had arrived, and he was now ready again to take the offensive, and sent me across the South Fork of the Shenandoah river over towards the Staunton pike. General Gordon's infantry followed. We found the position of the enemy, and from where we were we could see the enemy's artillery in park in the direction of and near Weir's Cave. I placed two of our guns in position to open on this part of their artille
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fight at Waynesboroa. (search)
Fight at Waynesboroa. On the 28th they had arrived, and he was now ready again to take the offensive, and sent me across the South Fork of the Shenandoah river over towards the Staunton pike. General Gordon's infantry followed. We found the position of the enemy, and from where we were we could see the enemy's artillery in park in the direction of and near Weir's Cave. I placed two of our guns in position to open on this part of their artillery which was now expecting our approach and was moving around to get in a piece of woods to attack. General Wickham arriving after we had started, ordered our guns to open before we had gotten near enough to accomplish anything, and the first shot from that gun had about the same effect that a stick in the hands of a mischievous boy, near enough to stir up a nest of wasps, would have had: they swarmed out and very soon were ready for us. Moving over to the Staunton pike, we soon learned that Wilson's division and Lowell's brigade had been