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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 211 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 211 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 156 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 152 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 135 3 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 98 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 70 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 66 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 63 1 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 63 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John B. Gordon or search for John B. Gordon in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The surrender of Gen. R. E. Lee. (search)
General Grant returned your sword, did he not? asked one of the company. The old hero straightened himself up and replied: No, sir, he did not. I was determined that the side-arms of officers should be exempt by the terms of the surrender, and, of course, I did not offer him mine. All that was said about swords was that General Grant apologized to me for not having his own sword, saying that it had been taken off in his baggage, and he had been unable to get it in time. General John B. Gordon, in his Reminiscences of the Civil war, page 462, says, in speaking of General Grant: In his Memoirs he has given a quietus to that widely circulated romance that he returned to Lee his proffered sword. I do not doubt that he would have done so; but there was no occasion for Lee's offering it, because in the terms agreed upon it was stipulated that the Confederate officers retain their sidearms. I have seen a Northern history in which Lee was represented as presenting his