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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Stewart Gordon or search for Stewart Gordon in all documents.

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Fifty-fourth, and Fifty-seventh, now commanded by Colonel A. C. Godwin, formerly first provost-marshal of Richmond, was ordered over the river to occupy the extreme left of the breastworks. This brigade crossed the river under a heavy fire of artillery, (for the Louisianians were already sustaining a furious fire from several batteries.) This fire from the artillery and sharp-shooters was kept up until after sunset. The other two brigades of General Early's division, commanded by Brigadier-Generals Gordon and Pegram, were held in position on this side the river. By sunset the enemy had extended his lines, in the form of a half-moon, so as to envelop our forces entirely, his right and left resting on the river above and below. At the same time he had formed three lines of attack, one behind the other, to assault the works held by General Hayes and the right of Hoke's brigade. The sun had gone down when this terrible onset was made. Although the odds were greatly against us, and w
for a general engagement. To do this, it was necessary to advance his line of skirmishers. He was entirely successful in deluding the wily foe, for, in the language of the F. F. V.'s, he fought right smart along the front of the Second corps. Colonel Carroll's brigade, composed of Western troops, conducted themselves in a manner that cannot be too highly praised. Colonel Carroll evinced considerable skill by drawing the enemy to his line of battle down she turnpike, where large numbers of Gordon's brigade, belonging to Early's division, were captured Colonel Carroll had a miraculous escape from instant death, his clothing having ten or twelve bullet-holes in it. Colonel Lockwood, of the same brigade, had his uniform pierced in several places by Minie balls. In the afternoon, General Meade ascertained that General French had participated in an engagement, and the enemy had massed a force strong enough to successfully resist him. The exact position of the Third corps, at this time,
Captain Lee then intrenched his force on the main street of the town. Previous to this, however, as he was marching into the place, he was fired on from both sides of the road, and his advance-guard of five cavalrymen, of the Twentieth New-York, was captured. About half-past 7 o'clock yesterday morning the rebels made a fierce attack with their cavalry and infantry. The fight continued with great vigor until nearly eleven o'clock, when a communication came, under flag of truce, from Colonel Gordon, commander of the attacking forces, for an immediate and unconditional surrender. In order to gain as much time as possible, and thinking that in the mean while some assistance might come to hand, Captain Lee sent a reply to the rebel Colonel asking for a personal interview to be granted. This was denied, and a peremptory demand was made for a surrender within five minutes. The second reply of Captain Lee was that he would not surrender, and that if the rebel commander wanted him he
rades that had been the prey of animals for two and a half months. On the left of our line, the dead of the enemy over a portion of the ground had bee well buried, and ours tolerably well covered, but toward the centre and right but few of ours were attempted to be buried or covered at all. The heads and feet of those on that part of the field that had been slightly covered, were mostly uncovered, and frequently found separated and some distance from the bodies. On the west of the road from Gordon and Lee's Mills to Rossville, and on our centre and right, and as far as I went to the south, but few burials had been attempted of either party. We had not time to explore the entire field, and no doubt many of our soldiers remain unburied yet. All good clothing had been stripped from the bodies. Such a sight of inhumanity I hope never to witness again. On the second of December, we marched to our old quarters at this post, and thus ended our part of a fruitful campaign. My command