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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 66 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
above). Assistant Secretary of War: Albert T. Bledsoe (April 1, 1862) Assistant Secretary of War: John A. Campbell (October 20, 1862). Adjt. And Insp.-General's Department General Samuel Cooper. Quartermaster-General's Department Colonel Abram C. Myers (March 15, 1861) Brig.-Gen. A. R. Lawton (Aug. 10, 1863). Commissary-General's Department Colonel Lucius B. Northrop (March 16, 1861) Brig.-Gen. I. M. St. John (February 16, 1865) Ordnance Department Brig.-Gen. Josiah Gorgas. Engineer Bureau Maj.-Gen. Jeremy F. Gilmer. Medical Department Brig.-Gen. Samuel P. Moore. Nitre and Mining Bureau Brig.-Gen. I. M. St. John Colonel Richard Morton (Feb. 16, 1865). Conscription Bureau Brig.-Gen. John S. Preston, Chief Col. T. P. August, Supt. Prison camps Brig.-Gen. John H. Winder. Exchange of prisoners Col. Robert Ould, Chief. Commission of Patents Commissioner of Patents Rufus R. Rhodes. The Confederate States Navy Department.
the Government was still at Montgomery, Alabama. An Ordnance Department was organized. Colonel Josiah Gorgas, a graduate of the United States Military Academy in the class of 1841, was appointed ch Confederate cause. The seat of the Confederate Government having been moved to Richmond, Colonel Gorgas there proceeded to organize the center of activity of the Ordnance Department. There were from other sources. The stringency of the blockade rendered it imperative that Brigadier-General Josiah Gorgas: chief of the Confederate ordnance department Colonel (later Brigadier-General) Josiah Gorgas served as chief of ordnance of the Confederate States Army throughout the war. He it was who sent Colonel (later Brigadier--General) George W. Rains to Augusta to build the great powderring most of his service he was in the ordnance bureau at Richmond, Virginia, ably seconding Colonel Gorgas. every effort be made to increase the domestic manufacture of all kinds of ordnance and or
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
sional army St. John, Isaac M., Feb. 16, 1865. Brigadier-generals, (special Appointments) provisional army Imboden, John D., Jan. 8, 1863. Johnson, Adam R., June 1, 1864. Brigadier-generals, (special) provisional army Benton, Samuel, July 26, 1864. Chambliss, J. R., Jr. , Dec. 19, 1863. Chilton, R. H., Oct. 20, 1862. Connor, James, June 1, 1864. Elliott, S., Jr., May 24, 1864. Fry, Birkett D., May 24, 1864. Gibson, R. L., Jan. 11, 1864. Goggin, James M., Dec. 4, 1864. Gorgas, Josiah, Nov. 10, 1864. Granberry, H. B., Feb. 29, 1864. Hodge, Geo. B., Aug. 2, 1864. Leventhorpe, C., Feb. 3, 1865. McRae, William, Nov. 4, 1864. Northrop, L. B., Nov. 26, 1864. Page, Richard L., Mar. 1, 1864. Payne, Wm. H., Nov. 1, 1864. Posey, Carnot, Nov. 1, 1862. Preston, John S., June 10, 1864. Reynolds, D. H., Mar. 5, 1864. Stevens, W. H., Aug. 28, 1864. Terry, William, May 19, 1864. Brigadier-generals, provisional army (with temporary rank) Anderson, R. H., July 26, 186
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Explosive or poisoned musket or rifle balls — were they authorized and used by the Confederate States army, or by the United States army during the Civil War?--a slander refuted. (search)
enemy did use explosive balls, and others prepared so as to leave a copper ring in the wound, but it was always spoken of as an atrocity beneath knighthood and abhorrent to civilization. The slander is only one of many instances in which our enemy have committed or attempted crimes of which our people and their Government were incapable, and then magnified the guilt by accusing us of the offences they had committed. . . . . Believe me, ever faithfully yours, Jefferson Davis. General Josiah Gorgas, the Chief of Ordnance of the Confederate States--now of the University of Alabama--writes, under date of July 11th, 1879, that to his knowledge the Confederate States never authorized or used explosive or poisoned rifle balls during the late war. In this statement also General I. M. St. John and General John Ellicott, both of the Ordnance Bureau, Confederate States army, entirely concur. The Adjutant-General of the United States also writes me, under date of August 22d, 1879, as
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 3: fall and winter of 1861 (search)
d 12-Pr. howitzers, and their ammunition was afflicted with very unreliable fuses. Our arsenals soon began to manufacture rifled guns, but they always lacked the copper and brass, and the mechanical skill necessary to turn out first-class ammunition. Gradually we captured Federal guns to supply most of our needs, but we were handicapped by our own ammunition until the close of the war. No department of our government deserves more credit than our Ordnance Bureau in Richmond under Gen. Josiah Gorgas, for its success in supplying the enormous amount of ordinance material consumed during the war. Although always economical of ammunition, yet we never lost any action from the lack of it. We were, however, finally very near the end of our resources, in the supply of one indispensable article. To make percussion caps nitric acid, mercury, and copper were required. Our Nitre and Mining Bureau had learned to make saltpetre from caves, and the earth under old barns and smoke houses, and
ooper, Virginia, Adjutant and Inspector General. Colonel A. C. Myers, first Quartermaster-General. Brigadier-General A. R. Lawton, Georgia, second Quartermaster-General; summoned from the field, where he was serving with the rank and command of Brigadier-General, to discharge the duties of this office. Colonel L. B. Northrup, South Carolina, first Commissary-General. Colonel L. M. St. John, second Commissary-General; afterwards promoted to the grade of Brigadier-General. Colonel Josiah Gorgas, Virginia, Chief of Ordnance; afterwards promoted to the grade of Brigadier-General. Colonel T. S. Rhett, in charge of the Ordnance Bureau. Colonel J. F. Gilmer, North Carolina, Chief of the Engineer Bureau; afterwards promoted to the grade of Major-General. Colonel S. P. Moore, M. D., South Carolina, Surgeon-General; afterwards promoted to the grade of Brigadier-General. Colonel John S. Preston, South Carolina, Chief of the Bureau of Conscription; afterwards promoted to
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Brigadier-Generals of the Confederate States Army, alphabetically arranged. (search)
28, 1863.Feb. 17, 1864.Oct. 13, 1862.Killed in action at Yellow Tavern, Virginia; brigade composed of the 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th and 5th North Carolina regiments, cavalry. 162Gordon, John B.GeorgiaGen. R. E. LeeMay 11, 1863.May 7, 1863.Jan. 25, 1864. Promoted Major-General May 14, 1864; brigade composed of the 13th, 26th, 31st, 38th, 60th and 61st Georgia regiments [originally Lawton's brigade], the 6th Georgia, and the 12th Georgia battalion, Early's division, Army of Northern Virginia. 163Gorgas, Josiah Gen. S. Cooper1864.1864.1864. Chief of Ordnance. 164Govan, D. C.ArkansasGen. J. E. JohnstonFeb. 5, 1864.Dec. 29, 1863.Feb. 5, 1864. Brigade composed of the 1st, 2d, 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th Arkansas regiments, commanded in turn by Generals Hardee, Hindman and Liddell. 165Gracie, A., Jr.AlabamaLt. Gen. E. K. SmithNov. 4, 1862.Nov. 4, 1862.April 22, 1863. Killed in the trenches in front of Petersburg December 2, 1864; brigade composed of the 63d Tennessee and the 43d Alabama regiments, and
II, 340, 341. Gillen, P. H., II, 384. Gilman, Frank G., I, 537, 562. Gilmore, Eliza Otis, I, 17-29, 37, 40, 41, 49, 59, 61, 122, 549, 50. Gilmore, John, I, 16, 21, 24; 11, 45. Gilmore, Quincy A., 11, 131, 178. Gilmore, Rodelphus H., II, 566. Gilsa, von, Leopold, I, 349,364,371, 372, 429. Gladding, R. H., II, 383. Goff, Nathan, II, 54. Goldsboro, L. M., 1, 204. Goldsmith, Monsieur, II, 528. Goodwin, Daniel R., I, 33. Gordan, Charles G., II, 494, 503. Gorgas, Josiah, I, 71. Gorman, Willis A., I, 238, 292, 296, 297. Graham, Thomas J., I, 178. Graham, Mrs. Those. J., I, 178. 597 Graham, William M., 11, 572. Granger, Gordon, I, 478, 490, 492, 493, 499. Grant, Gabriel, I, 248-250. Grant, Ulysses S., I, 192, 205, 256, 326, 453, 460, 471-477, 479, 484, 487, 488, 490, 498; II, 38, 51, 65, 69, 154-159, 163, 178-180, 203, 207, 225, 227, 284, 297, 320, 361, 381, 429, 445-447, 450-452, 479-481, 567, 571. Grant, Mrs. U. S., II, 481. Gra
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
ncinnati and Lexington railroad, built the Short Line to Cincinnati, was city engineer of Louisville, and from 1871 was chief engineer of the Lexington and Big Sandy railroad until his death, which occurred in West Virginia, April 7, 1880. Josiah Gorgas Josiah Gorgas, distinguished as chief of ordnance of the Confederate States, was born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, July 1, 1818. He was graduated at West Point as No. 6 in the class of 1841, and was assigned to the ordnance departmentJosiah Gorgas, distinguished as chief of ordnance of the Confederate States, was born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, July 1, 1818. He was graduated at West Point as No. 6 in the class of 1841, and was assigned to the ordnance department of the United States army. In 1845-46 he was in Europe on leave of absence for the study of his profession in foreign lands, and in the year following his return he went into active service in the Mexican war. March 3, 1847, he was promoted firstlieu-tenant. He served with distinction in the siege of Vera Cruz and was subsequently in charge of the ordnance depot at that point. On the return of peace he served as assistant ordnance officer at various arsenals until placed in command of Mt.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
ed energy when death deprived us of his invaluable services. General Gorgas, the able chief of the Department, had promised to make his con, therefore, especially fortunate that the following paper from General Gorgas has been preserved—that other interesting and valuable papers ht may be able to furnish. It is greatly to be regretted that General Gorgas, to whose energy, zeal, and executive ability, more than to anyund, however, the following most valuable historical memoranda. Mrs. Gorgas has kindly consented to the publication of this paper, with the statement that these notes were informal, and not intended by General Gorgas for publication in their present unfinished shape. We believe ay supplement and fill out subjects too briefly touched upon by General Gorgas. W. Allan. Paper I. [Found among the papers of the late General Josiah Gorgas, Chief of Ordnance of the Confederate States.] Notes on the Ordnance Department of the Confederate Government. S
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