Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for W. A. Gorman or search for W. A. Gorman in all documents.

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Major-General Commanding. Letter from General Gorman. headquarters Gorman's brigade, Fair Gorman's brigade, Fair Oaks, near Richmond, Va., June 13, 1862. His Excellency E. D. Morgan: sir: Now that an opportunit I am your Excellency's obedient servant, W. A. Gorman, Brig.-Gen. Commanding. Cincinnati Comt six o'clock, the head of Sedgwick's column — Gorman's brigade — deployed into line of battle in thPennsylvania battery were in line of battle at Gorman's right, forming an obtuse angle projecting tonnsylvania were held by Sedgwick in support of Gorman. The moment, however, was most critical. Theefore there was time to think of danger again, Gorman's gallant line had dressed up compactly, and wthey were describing, with irresistible fury. Gorman's line had extended itself on the right, untilder of Sedgwick, found themselves lapping over Gorman's extreme right; the enemy was fighting perpend, and fell dead in front of Kirby's battery. Gorman was moving up and down his glorious line, exhi[2 more...]<
elf during the whole of the engagement. He was in the front, and exposed as much as any man in the command. His example was of the greatest benefit, and he merits and should receive the commendation of his government. Generals Williams, Augur, Gorman, Crawford, Prince, Green, and Geary, behaved with conspicuous gallantry. Augur and Geary were severely wounded, and Prince, by losing his way in the dark while passing from one flank to the other, fell into the hands of the enemy. I desire publere lifting him into an ambulance. The men who were manning the gun at the time of the accident were as follows: Gough, first sponger and loader, killed; Flanagan, first sponger, killed; M. Kennedy, first shotman; Haney, first assistant sponger; Gorman, first train tackle man; Cunningham, first train tackle-man; Acaney, second train tackle-man; Thomas Gallaway, first handspike man; John Farrell, second handspike man; McKenny, powder-man; Cook, First Captain; Griffin, Second Captain; Captain McG
ar-guard by ten o'clock in the morning. The behavior of Gen. Banks's corps during the action was very fine. No greater gallantry and daring could be exhibited by any troops. I cannot speak too highly of the ceaseless intrepidity of Gen. Banks himself during the whole of the engagement. He was in the front, and exposed as much as any man in the command. His example was of the greatest benefit, and he merits and should receive the commendation of his government. Generals Williams, Augur, Gorman, Crawford, Prince, Green, and Geary, behaved with conspicuous gallantry. Augur and Geary were severely wounded, and Prince, by losing his way in the dark while passing from one flank to the other, fell into the hands of the enemy. I desire publicly to express my appreciation of the prompt and skilful manner in which Gens. McDowell and Sigel brought forward their respective commands, and established them on the field, and of their cheerful and hearty cooperation with me from beginning to en
pieces. I was standing close by at the time watching the splendid firing of the piece. God deliver me from ever again witnessing such a painful sight as those mangled and disfigured bodies presented. One lived for several moments, but died as we were lifting him into an ambulance. The men who were manning the gun at the time of the accident were as follows: Gough, first sponger and loader, killed; Flanagan, first sponger, killed; M. Kennedy, first shotman; Haney, first assistant sponger; Gorman, first train tackle man; Cunningham, first train tackle-man; Acaney, second train tackle-man; Thomas Gallaway, first handspike man; John Farrell, second handspike man; McKenny, powder-man; Cook, First Captain; Griffin, Second Captain; Captain McGrath, who stood by directing the fire, was thrown to the ground, and at first supposed to be killed. He soon recovered. While several members of company K, First Maryland, were taking breakfast, after the first repulse of the enemy, five differen