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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 20 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 9 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Willis A. Gorman or search for Willis A. Gorman in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 5 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Ball's Bluff and the arrest of General Stone. (search)
In the autumn of 1861 Stone's division, comprising the brigades of Gorman, Lander, and Baker, Afterward Sedgwick's division, Second Corps, brigade commanders Gorman, Dana, and Burns.--R. B. I. was observing the ferries or fords of the Potomac in front of Poolesville. On the 20tort of this movement, and to hold the enemy's attention, Stone sent Gorman's brigade across at Edwards Ferry, where the principal force of thehe ground gradually withdrew all his force, save one regiment, from Gorman's front, concentrated it against Baker, and about 3 o'clock attackeaptain Sloan, of the 15th Massachusetts. Himself remaining with Gorman at Edwards Ferry to direct the crossing there, General Stone placedptured or missing = 921. frequently, so that when they are pushed, Gorman [at Edwards Ferry] can come in on their flank. Yours respectfully ch followed, that the main body of the Confederates seemed to be in Gorman's front; finally, that he believed McCall to be still reconnoiterin
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
ieut.-Col. Patrick Kelly. Brigade loss: k, 7; w, 31; m, 1=39. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William H. French: 52d N. Y., Col. Paul Frank; 57th N. Y., Col. Samuel K. Zook; 66th N. Y., Col. Joseph C. Pinckney; 53d Pa., Col. John R. Brooke. Brigade loss: k, 32; w, 188; m, 22 = 242. Artillery, Capt. G. W. Hazzard: B, 1st N. Y., Capt. Rufus D. Pettit; G, 1st N. Y., Capt. John D. Frank; A and C, 4th U. S., Capt. G. W. Hazzard. Second division, Brig.-Gen. John Sedgwick. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Willis A. Gorman: 15th Mass., Lieut.-Col. John W. Kimball; 1st Minn., Col. Alfred Sully; 34th N. Y., Col. James A. Suiter; 82d N. Y., (2d Militia), Lieut.-Col. Henry W. Hudson; 1st Co. Mass. Sharp-shooters, Capt. John Saunders; 2d Co. Minn. Sharp-shooters, Capt. William F. Russell. Brigade loss: k, 40; w, 153; m, 3 = 106. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William W. Burns: 69th Pa., Col. Joshua T. Owen; 71st Pa., Maj. Charles W. Smith; 72d Pa., Col. De Witt C. Baxter; 106th Pa., Col. Turner G. Morehead.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
He would not believe that Heintzelman had withdrawn until I sent my last mounted man, urging and demanding reenforcements. The 71st Pennsylvania (also called the 1st California), of my brigade, arriving, I placed it behind the center of my line where a gap had been made by extending the 1st Minnesota to the left. General Franklin sent General Brooks's brigade to the left of my line to check the turning movement of the enemy, and Sumner, when he realized that Heintzelman had withdrawn, sent Gorman's and Dana's brigades to my support in front. General Sumner formed the 88th New York, of Meagher's brigade, and the 5th New Hampshire, of Caldwell's brigade, for a charge. A mass of men came up in my rear in full yell. I halted the crowd and asked for their commander. I am Captain McCartan of the 88th New York, sir, exclaimed an officer. I got them into line (about 250 men), facing up the Williamsburg road, which was raked by the grape and canister of the enemy's batteries. I gave t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
all was reached, and several gallant efforts were made in vain to carry it. When each repulse was followed by the rebel yells, the young men on my staff would cry out: Hurrah for Georgia! Georgia is having a free fight. The Western men had met in the 23d and 28th Georgia regiments men as brave as themselves and far more advantageously posted. Colonel Bragg, of the 6th Wisconsin, says in his report: We sat down in the dark to wait another attack, but the enemy was no more seen. At midnight Gorman's brigade of Sumner's corps relieved Gibbon's. General Gibbon reports officially 318 men killed and wounded — a loss sustained almost entirely, I think, at the stone-wall. The colonel of the 7th Wisconsin reports a loss of 147 men in killed and wounded out of 375 muskets carried into action. This shows that he had brave men and that he encountered brave men. From his report we infer that Gibbon had fifteen hundred men. On our side Colquitt had 11.00 men, and lost less than 100, owing to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
ank; 57th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Philip J. Parisen (k), Maj. Alford B. Chapman; 66th N. Y., Capt. Julius Wehle, Lieut.-Col. James H. Bull; 53d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Richards McMichael. Brigade loss: Antietam, k, 52; w, 244; m, 9 == 305. Artillery: B, 1st N. Y., Capt. Rufus D. Pettit; A and C, 4th U. S., Lieut. Evan Thomas. Artillery loss: Antietam, k, 1; w, 3 == 4. Second division, Maj.-Gen. John Sedgwick (w), Brig.-Gen. Oliver O. Howard. Staff loss: Antietam, w, 2. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Willis A. Gorman: 15th Mass., Lieut.-Col. John W. Kimball; 1st Minn., Col. Alfred Sully; 34th N. Y., Col. James A. Suiter; 82d N. Y. (2d Militia), Col. Henry W. Hudson; 1st Co. Mass. Sharp-shooters, Capt. John Saunders (k); 2d Co. Minn. Sharp-shooters, Capt. William F. Russell. Brigade loss: Antietam, k, 134; w, 539; m, 67 == 740. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Oliver 0. Howard, Col. Joshua T. Owen, Col. De Witt C. Baxter: 69th Pa., Col. Joshua T. Owen; 71st Pa., Col. Isaac J. Wistar (w), Lieut. Rich