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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 7 5 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 22, 1864., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 4 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 4 0 Browse Search
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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 31: battle of Chickamauga. (search)
de the army if necessary to hold the left. Johnson's brigade of Cheatham's division was ordered to support the brigade under Colonel Mills, and the reserve corps under General W. H. T. Walker (Gist's and Liddell's divisions) was ordered into the Breckenridge battle, Gist's brigade against the left angle of the breastworks, and Walthall's to the place of Cleburne's division. The other brigade of Gist's division supported the battle of his own brigade, and General Liddell was ordered with Govan's brigade to advance, passing beyond the enemy's left to the Chattanooga road, and wheel to the left against his left rear. The troops, without exception, made a brave, desperate fight, but were unsuccessful, and forced to suspend aggressive work. As the grand wheel to the left did not progress, I sent, at eleven o'clock, to say to General Bragg that my column of attack could probably break the enemy's line if he cared to have it go in. Before answer came, General Stewart, commanding m
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
ong the Rough and Ready road aind along the railroad, breaking it as they came. When General Davis joined to General Howard, General Blair's corps, on General Howard's left, was thrown in reserve, and was immediately sent well to the right below Jonesborough to act against that flank, along with General Kilpatrick's cavalry. About 4 p. m. General Davis was all ready and assaulted the enemy's lines across open fields, carrying them very handsomely and taking as prisoners the greater part of Govan's brigade, including its commander, with two 4-gun batteries. Repeated orders were sent to Generals Stanley and Schofield to hurry up, but the difficult nature of the country and the absence of roads are the reasons assigned why these troops did not get well into position for attack before night rendered further operations impossible. Of course the next morning the enemy was gone and had retreated south. About 2 o'clock that night the sounds of heavy explosions were heard in the dir
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 93 (search)
ily that I directed it to be relieved by one of General Baird's brigades, and a general assault of the enemy's position was ordered. The works were carried along the entire line after very heavy fighting and a loss in killed, wounded, and missing of about 1,000 men. This is only an estimate, as it is impossible to get accurate returns at this time. Two field batteries (consisting of 10 guns) were captured in the enemy's works. Probably about 1,000 prisoners were captured, with Brigadier-General Govan and a number of officers. Several (10 reported) battle-flags were taken. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jef. C. Davis, Brevet Major-General, Commanding. Brig. Gen. W. D. Whipple, Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland. Report of casualties of the Fourteenth Army Corps for September 1, 1864. Zzz Report of casualties of the Fourteenth Army Corps, &c.-continued. Zzz Jef. C. Davis, Brevet Major-General, Commanding. headquarter
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 130 (search)
break through the enemy's lines, driving them away from their artillery, the capture of which is claimed, as it seems justly, by Colonel Mizner. The suddenness, determination, and silence of the assault appears to have astounded and disconcerted the enemy, as they left their first line of intrenchments after but a feeble resistance. At the second line of breastworks the contest grew hotter, but soon the enemy fell back, leaving a great number of prisoners in our hands, among whom Brigadier-General Govan, who surrendered at the summons of First Sergt. Patrick Irwin, Fourteenth Regiment Michigan Volunteers. Said regiment also captured the battle-flag of the First Regiment Arkansas (Confederate) and 4 mules with harness. The determined and rapid manner in which the Fourteenth Michigan advanced was probably the reason why the loss in that regiment was comparatively small (2 killed and 28 wounded). The Sixteenth Regiment Illinois Infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Cahill commanding, follow
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 136 (search)
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Henry R. Mizner, Colonel Fourteenth Michigan Infantry. Capt. T. Wiseman, Assistant Adjutant-General. camp Fourteenth Michigan Infantry, Jonesborough, Ga., September 5, 1864. sir: In compliance with orders, I have to report the participation of the Fourteenth Michigan Infantry in the campaign from August 24 to date: On the 1st of September my regiment advanced with its brigade, assaulted and carried the enemy's works, capturing Brigadier-General Govan, who surrendered his command to First Sergt. Patrick Irwin, of my regiment. I know that my regiment was the first to enter the enemy's works and capture 8 pieces of artillery, with caissons, and the battle-flag of the First Arkansas, but have observed so much feeling, and so many conflicting claims, that I do not desire to press the subject, for I certainly have no wish to detract from any regiment, but feel that the entire brigade and division did nobly. My loss was 2 men killed
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 141 (search)
bravest and most faithful officers in the command. His manly qualities endeared him to all that knew him. While it is not a matter of very great importance to the regiment, and perhaps should not be made mention of here, yet, as much feeling, as well as divers opinions, exist in and among the different regiments of this division concerning it, I will state that I think I am prepared with satisfactory evidence to prove that the flag of the Second Arkansas Regiment (rebel), as well as General Govan, were captured by Sergeants Dickerson and Carver, of this regiment. I would not, however, have the commanding generals think that it is either with myself or regiment deemed a matter worthy of any great consideration, unless otherwise regarded by them. Nor do we claim the entire credit for anything that was there done, for we well know that without the assistance of the other regiments of the brigade and division we could not have been successful in anything like that attained in the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 170 (search)
entucky (rebel) Regiments, known as Lewis' brigade, but during the fight were under command of Colonel Caldwell, of the Ninth Kentucky. The brigade is in the division formerly commanded by General Bate, but on September 1, by General Brown. In front of the Tenth Kentucky and Seventy-fourth Indiana, upon the right, was the Sixth and Seventh Arkansas Regiments, and the consolidated batteries of the Eighth and Nineteenth Arkansas, four guns. They were attached to the brigade commanded by General Govan, of General Cleburne's division, and formed the right of his command. A large proportion of the officers and men comprising these commands in our front, except those of one of the Kentucky regiments upon our left, were either killed or captured. They fought with the greatest desperation, and only yielded to the superior heroism of our men. The bayonet was freely used all along the line upon both sides. The troops met were confessedly among the best of the rebel army, were superior in
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 14: Sherman's campaign in Georgia. (search)
low Jonesboroa, and Garrard was left at Couch's to scout the country in the direction of Atlanta. Davis's corps, of Thomas's army, very soon touched the left of Howard's forces, and relieved Blair's (Fifteenth) corps, which was disposed so as to connect with Kilpatrick's horsemen. By four o'clock in the afternoon, August 31. all was in readiness for an advance, when Davis charged, and almost instantly carried the Confederate line of works covering Jonesboroa on the north, and captured General Govan and a greater portion of his brigade, and a four-gun battery. Stanley and Schofield, who had been ordered forward, did not arrive until it was too late to make another charge that evening, owing to the peculiar character of the country. In the morning there was no foe on their front. Hardee had fled, and so ended the battle of Jonesboroa. At two o'clock in the morning Sept. 1. sounds like the low bellowing of distant thunder reached the ears of Sherman from the north. He was a li
4 p. m. At this hour the attack began as ordered. Stewart's Corps carrying the temporary works in his front; Hardee's failed to push the attack as ordered, and thus the enemy remaining in possession of his works on Stewart's right, compelled Stewart by an enfilade fire to abandon the position he had carried. I have every reason to believe that our attack would have been successful had my order been executed. I am strengthened in this opinion by information since obtained through Brigadier General Govan, some time a prisoner in the enemy's hands, touching the condition of the enemy at the time. The delay from one to four o'clock, p. m., was unfortunate, but would have not proved irretrievable had the attack been vigorously made. Ascertaining that the attack had failed, I caused the troops to retire to their former positions. The position and demonstration of McPherson's Army on the right threatening my communications, made it necessary to abandon Atlanta or check his movements
es were sent in by Walker to Forrest's support. Croxton, of course, was brought to a dead halt; but now Thomas sent up Baird's division, and the Rebel brigades were hurled back, badly cut up. Hereupon, Walker in turn sent up Liddell's division, making the odds against us two to one; when Baird was in turn driven: the Rebels, charging through the lines of the 14th, 16th, and 18th U. S. regulars, taking two batteries; while Walthall's Georgia brigade captured the 5th regulars, 411 strong, and Govan's, charging by its side, took 100 more prisoners. One of the batteries here lost was the 1st Michigan, formerly Loomis's; regarded by the whole army with pride, and by those who served in it with an affection little short of idolatry. It had done yeoman service on many a hard-fought field, and was fondly regarded as well nigh invincible. But now, abandoned by its supports, who recoiled before a Rebel charge in overwhelming force, with all its horses shot and most of its men killed and w
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