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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 22 0 Browse Search
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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
the Propellor, it being quite cool and breezy. At St. George's, on the canal, just as I had turned in, I was informed that a number of Union citizens had assembled on the dock and were desirous of seeing me, as they had seen me pass through when wounded. Fortunately the boat was about starting, which, together with my dishabille, were given as excuses for my non-appearance, and the people of St. George's were thus saved a most eloquent address. The first person I saw this morning was Duncan Graham, looking very handsome and very like his brother Willie. Duncan is on board the Octorara, Commodore Porter's flagship. After I had breakfasted, I attended to shifting the baggage and securing my place on the Old Point boat. I cannot tell you how miserable and sad I was and am at parting from you and the dear children, and as the boat pushed off and I saw those three fine boys standing on the dock, I thought my heart would break. But it cannot be helped and must be endured, and we m
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
on the crest from Devil's Den to the Peach Orchard; Ward's brigade on the left, Graham's on the right, at the Angle, De Trobriand's in the centre, connecting them by sburg Road, Carr's brigade being in the front line, connecting on his left with Graham, his right being near the Rogers house, Not shown on map. with Brewster in hosted along the Peach Orchard road. Barksdale has made a determined assault on Graham, at the angle at the Peach Orchard. The contest has been fierce and stubborn all along the line, but the angle has been broken in, Graham's brigade routed, Graham himself being wounded and a prisoner, the enemy is advancing, and the Third CorpsGraham himself being wounded and a prisoner, the enemy is advancing, and the Third Corps, notwithstanding its heroic fight and stubborn resistance, is being swept from the field. The batteries on the Peach Orchard crest are, now that the angle is brokene Brigadier General Paul Zook, and among the wounded, Generals Sickles, Barlow, Graham, and Warren slightly. We have taken a large number of prisoners. I shall rema
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 17 (search)
and General Humphreys, Sickles rode off to the rear to headquarters. Before he had reached there the sound of cannon announced that the battle had begun. Hastening rapidly on, he was met by General Meade at the door of his headquarters, who said, General, I will not ask you to dismount, the enemy are engaging your fronts, the council is over. It was an unfortunate moment, as it proved, for a council of war. Sickles, putting spurs to his horse, flew back to his command, and, finding that Graham's brigade was in advance as far as he desired, he was pushing that brigade and a battery forward about one hundred yards, when General Meade at length arrived on the field. The following colloquy ensued, which I gathered from several officers present: Are you not too much extended, General, said Meade. Can you hold this front? Yes, replied Sickles, until more troops are brought up, the enemy are attacking in force, and I shall need support. General Meade then let drop some remark, showi
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix Y (search)
ncil terminated, it is fair to presume what General Meade's intentions were before the decision of the corps commanders had been reached. Headquarters army of the Potomac, July 2, 1863, 11 P. M. General Halleck: The enemy attacked me about 4 P. M. this day, and, after one of the severest contests of the war, was repulsed at all points. We have suffered considerably in killed and wounded; among the former are Brigadier-General Paul Zook; and among the wounded, Generals Sickles, Barlow, Graham; and Warren, slightly. We have taken a large number of prisoners. I shall remain in my present position to-morrow, but am not prepared to say, until better advised of the condition of the army, whether my operations will be of an offensive or defensive character. George G. Meade, Major General. If any testimony be demanded, additional to that which now seems conclusive against the charge that General Meade intended to retreat, it will only be necessary to refer to that of General Hunt
, 241, 256, 388-390, 409, 410, 413, 416-419, 422. Gilmore, Gen., II, 284. Glendale, battle of (see New Market Cross Roads). Gooch, Senator, II, 178, 187. Gordon, Jacob, I, 7. Gordon, John B., II, 19, 20, 50, 51, 57, 92, 366. Graham, Capt., I, 53. Graham, Charles K., II, 79, 83, 85, 96, 326, 419. Graham, Duncan, I, 301. Graham, James D., I, 14, 15, 150, 151, 155, 156, 209, 213, 216, 263. Graham, Mason, I, 90. Graham, Richard, I, 140, 145. Graham, Wm., I, 27, 5Graham, Duncan, I, 301. Graham, James D., I, 14, 15, 150, 151, 155, 156, 209, 213, 216, 263. Graham, Mason, I, 90. Graham, Richard, I, 140, 145. Graham, Wm., I, 27, 50. Grant, Lewis A., II, 100. Grant, Ulysses S., I, 196, 245, 246, 248, 257, 260, 381; II, 137, 162, 163, 168, 175-178, 181-192, 195-198, 200-206, 208, 211-214, 216-218, 220-224, 226-228, 233-239, 241-242, 244-248, 251-253, 255-258, 260-263, 265, 271, 273, 275-277, 279, 285, 288, 291, 296-299, 307, 317, 319, 323, 340-345. Grant, Mrs. Ulysses S., II, 266. Gratz, Mr., II, 276. Great Lakes Survey, I, 207-216. Greeley, Horace, I, 266; II, 162, 187, 215, 216. Greene, George S., II