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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 11: first mission to England.—1833. (search)
l assent Aug. 28, 1833. Wilberforce breathed his last in London, and a week later still (August 5) his remains were interred in Westminster Abbey by the side of Fox and Pitt. In the unexampled train of mourners, behind princes of the blood-royal, prelates of the church, members of both London Breakfast to W. L. G., p. 47. Houses of Parliament, many of England's proudest nobility, and representatives of the intellect, virtue, philanthropy, and industry of the land—behind Wellington, Peel, Graham, Morpeth, Fowell Buxton, Lushington, Stanley, the Grattans—walked with his friend George Thompson the editor of the Liberator, the least observed and the least known of the funeral procession, yet the one upon whom, if upon any one, Wilberforce's mantle had fallen, and whose prominence in this historic scene must grow with the shifting perspective of time. On Saturday, the 18th of August, Mr. Garrison embarked from London in the packet-ship Hannibal, Capt. Hebard, for the United States.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
go to the meeting, and adjourn to Old Tammany, and that there I should offer a resolution, which was to be seconded by Mr. Graham, Jas. Lorimer Graham. afterward postmaster. We went, took possession of the meeting, and adjourned to Tammany; and Jas. Lorimer Graham. afterward postmaster. We went, took possession of the meeting, and adjourned to Tammany; and I had the greatest difficulty in crowding my way up to the platform all out of breath, choked with dust, and steaming with perspiration, where I called for Mr. Garrison, or any of his friends, to appear; promising them safe conduct and fair play. But nobody answered. I made a short speech: Graham backed out; and the resolutions were passed with a roar like that you may sometimes hear in the Bay of Fundy. On my way out, I was completely surrounded, lifted off my feet, and carried by storm id have been the consequences, if they had meddled with Garrison where I was; for we were banded together, Colonel Webb, Mr. Graham, and perhaps twenty more, with a determination to see fair play, at the risk of our lives—taking it for granted that fr
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
ife and her husband rejoiced in their new existence, with Isaac Knapp as a pleasant and helpful inmate,—contributing generously to the common expenses,—the occasional companionship of his excellent sister Abigail from Newburyport, and visits of friends and relatives from Brooklyn and Providence—in short, with open house, the beginning of a life-long hospitality. As the welcome ran out to the Mays: If they are Grahamites, we have a fine spring of water in Ms. our cellar, and plenty of Graham flour upstairs. If they have an affection for coffee or tea, we have both. If they love retirement, we are in the midst of it. If they have an eye for natural scenery, we will show them as pretty a prospect as one could desire to see. Do they wish to be contiguous to the city, yet not implicated in its follies and fashions? Then they will assuredly come to Freedom's Cottage. And yet, with all his imputed rashness, had the editor of the Liberator ever done a rasher thing than to get ma<