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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
s; 14th, 35th, 45th, and 49th Ga., Col. S. T. Player. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. M. Scales, Lieut.-Col. G. T. Gordon, Col. W. Lee J. Lowrance; 13th N. C., Col. J. H. Hylnan, Lieut.-Col. H. A. Rogers; 16th N. C., Capt. L. W. Stowe; 22d N. C., Col. James Conner; 34th N. C., Col. William Lee J. Lowrance, Lieut.-Col. G. T. Gordon; 38th N. C., Col. W. J. Hoke, Lieut.-Col. John Ashford. Artillery, Maj. William T. Poague; Albemarle (Va.) Art., Capt. James W. Wyatt; Charlotte (N. C.) Art., Capt. Joseph Graham; Madison (Miss.) Light Art., Capt. George Ward; Virginia Batt., Capt. J. V. Brooke. artillery reserve, Col. R. Lindsay Walker :--:McIntosh's Battalion, Maj. D. G. McIntosh; Danville (Va.) Art., Capt. R. S. Rice; Hardaway (Ala.) Art., Capt. W. B. Hurt; 2d Rockbridge (Va.) Art., Lieut. Samuel Wallace; Virginia Batt., Capt. M. Johnson. Pegram's Battalion, Maj. W. J. Pegram, Capt. E. B. Brunson; Crenshaw (Va.) Batt.; Fredericksburg (Va.) Art., Capt. E. A. Marye; Letcher (Va.) Art., Ca
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 55: operations of the Mississippi Squadron in the latter part of 1864 and in 1865. (search)
ting-Master's Mate, James Malis; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, M. L. Andrews; Acting-Third-Assistant, L. C. Thatcher. Tug Ivy. Acting-Ensign, Perry C. Wright: Acting-Master's Mate, Daniel Sullivan; Acting-Second-Assistant Engineer, Thomas Nerley. Tug Thistle. Acting-Ensign, R. J. Ettingham; Acting-Master's Mate, J. W. Hambrick; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, W. P. Clugsten; Acting-Third-Assistants, L. H. Jones and Byrd Allen. Tug Daisy. Acting-Master's Mates, Joseph Graham; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, F. M. Magers; Acting-Third-Assistant, J. E. Henderson. W. H. Brown--Fourth-rate. Pilot, Jefferson A. French; Acting-Ensign, J. Shinn; Acting-Master's Mates, O. Deweese, Jr., R. H. Hopkins and C. W. Dimmock; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, R. Cutter; Acting-Second-Assistants, A. C. P. French and G. W. Hart. General Lyon--Fourth-rate. Pilot, Richard E. Birch; Acting-Ensigns, James Martin and Thos. Cadwell; Acting-Master's Mates, E. W. Rob
signed, I have been promoted to the captaincy. And I presume the mistake has arisen in consequence of the identity of the two names — that of Captain Graham, from Petersburg, Virginia, (who lost two guns,) and my own. His case is now undergoing an examination before a court-martial in Petersburg. At the time of the engagement we were in General Holmes's division, and under the immediate supervision of Colonel Deshler, his Chief of Artillery. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Joseph Graham, Captain, commanding Tenth North Carolina Troops. Reports of Captain Masters. July 12, 1862. Captain Morgan, A. A. General, Light Division: Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the battery of rifled guns under my command, from the twenty-sixth to the first: Shortly before the action at Mechanicsville began, the enemy withdrew from their works in front of me. In the progress of the action I saw that while the guns were useless, if ke
ry officers an exact programme for their proceeding. Colonel Brown was to take to Major Cocks twelve guns, viz., four ten-pounder Parrott rifles, two Napoleons, four twelve-pounder howitzers, and two six-pounders, under Captains Watson and Macon, and Lieutenants Thurmond and Pegram. He was to move by four P. M., so as to approach his position about dusk. Lieutenant-Colonel Coleman was to take to Coggin's Point, on its right, eight twelve-pounder howitzers, under Captains Dance and Joseph Graham, and Lieutenant Griffin. Major Nelson also to take to Coggin's Point, on its left, eight guns, viz., two ten-pounder Parrott rifles, two three-inch rifles, two twelve-pounder howitzers, and two six-pounders, under Captains Huckstep and R. C. M. Page, and Lieutenant Woodruff. Lieutenant-Colonel Cutts, to a point considerably farther on the left, eleven long-range guns, viz., eight Parrott rifles, two three-inch rifles, and one Napoleon, under Captains Lane and Ross, and Lieutenant R
act of its members rose superior to all obstacles. Dr. Tebault served as a field surgeon with the 21st Louisiana and 10th South Carolina regiments, and afterwards as a hospital surgeon. Dr. Foard was medical director of the Army of Tennessee. Dr. Graham was surgeon of the Sixty-seventh North Carolina Infantry. Dr. Kellar was medical director of the Trans-Mississippi Department. Christopher Hamilton Tebault, M. D. Medical director A. J. Foard Surgeon Joseph Graham Medical director Surgeon Joseph Graham Medical director J. M. Kellar Druitt's Surgery, Bartlett On Fevers, Wood's Practice, Watson's Practice, Tanner's Practice, and a copy of the United States Dispensatory, by Wood & Bache. Occasional copies of The Confederate States medical and surgical Journal, reached field and hospital surgeons. It was published in Richmond by Ayres & Wade, with the approval and under the supervision of the Surgeon-General, monthly from January, 1864, until February, 1865. A complete file from which much important histor
act of its members rose superior to all obstacles. Dr. Tebault served as a field surgeon with the 21st Louisiana and 10th South Carolina regiments, and afterwards as a hospital surgeon. Dr. Foard was medical director of the Army of Tennessee. Dr. Graham was surgeon of the Sixty-seventh North Carolina Infantry. Dr. Kellar was medical director of the Trans-Mississippi Department. Christopher Hamilton Tebault, M. D. Medical director A. J. Foard Surgeon Joseph Graham Medical director Surgeon Joseph Graham Medical director J. M. Kellar Druitt's Surgery, Bartlett On Fevers, Wood's Practice, Watson's Practice, Tanner's Practice, and a copy of the United States Dispensatory, by Wood & Bache. Occasional copies of The Confederate States medical and surgical Journal, reached field and hospital surgeons. It was published in Richmond by Ayres & Wade, with the approval and under the supervision of the Surgeon-General, monthly from January, 1864, until February, 1865. A complete file from which much important histor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Graham, Joseph 1759-1836 (search)
Graham, Joseph 1759-1836 Military officer; born in Chester county, Pa., Oct. 13, 1759; removed to North Carolina at an early age. In 1778 he joined the Continental army and served through the remainder of the war with gallantry; in 1780 received three bullet wounds and six sabre-thrusts while guarding the retreat of Maj. W. R. Davie, near Charlotte; later, after his recovery, he defeated 600 Tories near Fayetteville with a force of 136 men.. In 1814 he was commissioned major-general, when he led 1,000 men from North Carolina against the Creek Indians. He died in Lincoln county, N. C., Nov. 12, 1836.
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 4: early married life, 1836-1840. (search)
age; N. Wright and Judge Burnet, for example. Meanwhile the turbulent spirits went beyond this and talked of revolution and of righting things without law that could not be righted by it. At the head of these were Morgan, Neville, Longworth, Joseph Graham, and Judge Burke. A meeting was convoked at Lower Market Street to decide whether they would permit the publishing of an abolition paper, and to this meeting all the most respectable citizens were by name summoned. There were four classesher hoped to do it without a mob; those who felt ashamed to go, foreseeing the probable consequence, and yet did not decidedly frown upon it; and those who sternly and decidedly reprehended it. The first class was headed by Neville, Longworth, Graham, etc.; the second class, though of some numbers, was less conspicuous; of the third, Judge Burnet, Dr. Fore, and N. Wright were specimens; and in the last such men as Hammond, Mansfield, S. P. Chase, Salmon P. Chase. and Chester were prominent
seur first captain; on his promotion it was commanded by Basil C. Manly, and then by B. B. Guion. The next was Reilly's hard-fighting Rowan light battery This battery was equipped with guns captured at Manassas. After Reilly's promotion to major, Capt. John A. Ramsey commanded it to the end of the war. Capt. T. H. Brem, of Charlotte, organized another of the light batteries, and with rare patriotism advanced out of his private means the money to buy uniforms, equipment and horses. Capts. Joseph Graham and A. B. Williams succeeded to the command. When this battery lost its guns at New Bern, the town of Charlotte had its church bells moulded into new guns for it. The other two light batteries were commanded by Capts. A. D. Moore and T. J. Southerland. The five heavy batteries, commanded respectively by Capts. H. T. Guion, W. S. G. Andrews, J. L. Manney, S. D. Pool and T. K. Sparrow, were all assigned to coast defense, and while they did not have as much field service as the light b
y at Gettysburg and in the early afternoon, no North Carolina troops were in the assaulting forces. Four North Carolina batteries were posted along the center and right of the Confederate lines. These were Manly's, Reilly's, Latham's and Capt. Joseph Graham's. They faithfully executed the duties assigned them, and were under fire and engaged as circumstances required. In the late afternoon, Johnson's division was ordered to assail Culp's hill. One of his brigades, Walker's, was detached, berate cavalry, and allowed to come almost within the lines. They were, of course, quickly routed with severe loss, but, in the short struggle, Gen. J. J. Pettigrew, of North Carolina was mortally wounded. At the beginning of the melee, says Captain Graham, General Pettigrew's horse, frightened by the sudden and near discharge of musketry, plunged and threw his rider. Rising in great pain, for he was still suffering from his wound received at Seven Pines, and his arm was in a sling from hi
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