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as sent to the right to support Gen. Hancock, and did good service. The General Commanding deeply regrets the absence at Warwick of the Thirty-sixth New-York. Graham's brigade came up too late to share in the glory of the fight, but not too late to assure the Division-General that they were ready for any duty which soldiers co to the centre fort, called Fort Page, we found it occupied by Neal's (late Birney's) Twenty-third Pennsylvania regiment, which, having come up in the night, with Graham's brigade, of Casey's division, as a reserve to Gen. Hancock, had early scoured the field. The great fort was much damaged by our artillery fire. Only a siegestreet, said to have been recently occupied by General Johnston, he there established his staff, and himself returned with one or two aids to the battle-field. Graham's brigade and others soon arrived, and before evening thousands of Federal troops were encamped in and about the city, while a reconnoissance as far as the Chicka
upposing the main object had been accomplished. The tumult had aroused Couch's division, and he was prepared for resistance, but the fugitives, seeking refuge from destruction, broke through his lines and shook them severely. But the inspiring efforts of Keyes, Couch, Peck and Devens, restored their confidence, and they waited the shock firmly. It came soon and vehemently, and raged along the whole line, but fiercest in front of Fair Oaks, where Abercrombie with five regiments — composing Graham's old brigade — was posted with order to hold the position at all hazard. The enemy evidently aimed to get possession of the railroad and Bottom's Bridge, which they supposed were our only lines of retreat. Abercrombie made a gallant stand, and the remainder of Couch's force held the enemy in check, although compelled to recede slowly and take up new lines of defence. The enemy fought his troops with surprising rapidity, and constantly hurried in reenforcements. The slaughter on both sid
ashington, June 5, 1862. General orders no. 59. A Camp of Instruction for fifty thousand men — cavalry, artillery and infantry, in due proportions — will be immediately formed near Annapolis, Md. Major-Gen. Wool, United States Army, will command the camp, in addition to his duties as Department Commander. The ground will be selected, and the troops, which will be assembled as rapidly as possible under orders from the War Department, will be placed in position as they arrive, Brig.-General L. P. Graham is assigned to duty as Chief of Cavalry at the camp. Brevet Brig.-Gen. Harvey Brown as Chief of Artillery, according to his brevet. A Chief of the Infantry arm will hereafter be designated. The Chief of Ordnance, the Quartermaster-General, Commissary-General, Surgeon-General, and Paymaster-General, will each designate an experienced regular officer as the chief of their respective departments at the camp. These officers will be subject to the orders of Gen. Wool, and under his
ully contributed to Gen. Hooker's success at Bristow station. Capt. Graham, First United States Artillery, put at General Sigel's dispositiutifully correct, and proved irresistible. On the thirty-first, Capt. Graham, not being required on the right, was sent to the extreme left, rounds, with the exception of canister; had only canister left. Capt. Graham had but two guns of his battery under his immediate command on tnies of Fifth New-York artillery, commanded by Captains McGrath and Graham; Fifteenth Indiana, and one or two more Western batteries. All of ers. Our artillery replied with much spirit, Captains McElrath and Graham, of the Fifth artillery, silencing the Loudon batteries. Shot and y in the most gallant manner, and to my entire satisfaction. Lieutenant Graham, commanding company A, (Captain Graham being sick in hospitalCaptain Graham being sick in hospital,) was wounded, and since had his leg amputated, behaved in the most admirable manner. Lieutenant Horner, acting Adjutant, (Adjutant Barnett
its shots into the reenforcements moving from the enemy's heights down into the woods. On the twenty-seventh, with two sections and Robinson's brigade, Capt. Randolph had powerfully contributed to Gen. Hooker's success at Bristow station. Capt. Graham, First United States Artillery, put at General Sigel's disposition, as repeatedly drove the enemy back into the woods, as the giving way of that infantry left the front unobstructed. His practice was beautifully correct, and proved irresistible. On the thirty-first, Capt. Graham, not being required on the right, was sent to the extreme left, and rendered important service with Gen. Reno, firing until late in the night. Lieut.----, a German officer of distinction, put at my disposal by General Sigel, with two long-range Parrotts covered our right flank, and drove afar the enemy's battery and regiments. I name these gentlemen as ornaments to their branch of the service. I must refer to Gen. Hooker to render justice to the part
ion of canister; had nothing but canister left. Captain Potts had expended about one thousand rounds, with the exception of canister; had only canister left. Capt. Graham had but two guns of his battery under his immediate command on the morning of the surrender; had probably one hundred rounds of all kinds, but no long-time fusand cavalry, Colonel Russell; a detachment of First Maryland cavalry, (home brigade;) two companies of Fifth New-York artillery, commanded by Captains McGrath and Graham; Fifteenth Indiana, and one or two more Western batteries. All of the infantry, with the exception of the three months men, were raw troops. Gen. White retreateopened a furious fire simultaneously from Maryland, Loudon Heights, and Sandy Hook, with howitzers. Our artillery replied with much spirit, Captains McElrath and Graham, of the Fifth artillery, silencing the Loudon batteries. Shot and shell flew in every direction, and the soldiers and citizens were compelled to seek refuge behi
mpany G, (after Captain Childs was wounded,) Lieutenant McKechnie, commanding company H, Lieutenant Klingsoch, company E, and Lieutenant Powell, company I, all performed their duty in the most gallant manner, and to my entire satisfaction. Lieutenant Graham, commanding company A, (Captain Graham being sick in hospital,) was wounded, and since had his leg amputated, behaved in the most admirable manner. Lieutenant Horner, acting Adjutant, (Adjutant Barnett being sick,) behaved splendidly, and Captain Graham being sick in hospital,) was wounded, and since had his leg amputated, behaved in the most admirable manner. Lieutenant Horner, acting Adjutant, (Adjutant Barnett being sick,) behaved splendidly, and performed every duty in the coolest manner and to my entire satisfaction. Captain Whiting and Lieutenant Morris, of battery company K, although not under my immediate notice, being detailed on artillery service in another part of the field, I learn behaved well--Lieutenant Morris making some excellent shots with his rifled guns, and silencing one of the enemy's batteries. The thanks of the entire regiment are due to Surgeon Humphries and Assistant-Surgeon Harding, who were indefatigable in the
was killed in attempting to advance through the corn-field, and his force driven back. When Birney took command, all the troops of Reno had been withdrawn from the fight, and the line was formed anew on the left. The same formation of the ground extended to the left. Birney drew up his troops at an angle with the line first held by Stevens, so as to front the rebels on the left, and sending Robinson's brigade still further in the same direction, posted Berry's brigade as a reserve, and Graham's battery near it, and himself advanced to the attack with his whole brigade. A heavy fire was kept up for half an hour. From the time when Kearny came on the field a fierce thunder-storm had been raging, and the rain fell incessantly and heavily. It was difficult to keep ammunition dry, but with the advantage of artillery, Birney continued his fire for a considerable time, and inflicted severe losses on the enemy. Finding their line at length somewhat shaken and their fire proving wea