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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 40 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 16 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 14 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 13 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 5 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown. You can also browse the collection for Graham or search for Graham in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 4 document sections:

James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 7: battle of Black Jack. (search)
pproached Prairie City, the people of that place and vicinity were congregated in the house of Dr. Graham to hear preaching, the doctor himself being a prisoner in the camp at Black Jack. They could aken prisoners of war. One of them, however, had come very near getting his quietus. A son of Dr. Graham, a boy of about eleven years, seized his father's double-barrelled gun at the first alarm, andmselves on the ground, and the trembling guard also lay down, taking care to get the person of Dr. Graham between his own precious carcass and the enemy. So matters were, when the ruffian to whom I have alluded went to the tent with fierce oaths. Dr. Graham saw him approach with ferocious expression, and, just at that moment, the ruffian raised his pistol, aiming at the Doctor, who gave a spring just as the piece went off, the ball hitting him in the side, and inflicting a flesh wound. Graham sprang into the ditch of the ravine; and, as he did so, received another ball in his hip. He broke
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, A Sabbath gathering. (search)
ancying that it would be easily taken, and that no resistance would be offered, six of Pate's men started on the expedition. At the time this party approached Prairie City, the people of that place and vicinity were congregated in the house of Dr. Graham to hear preaching, the doctor himself being a prisoner in the camp at Black Jack. They could watch as well as pray, however. There were some twenty men present, and most of them, after the old Revolutionary pattern, had gone to church with thf scathless, and got back to tell a frightful story to Pate about the other men being killed — horribly! &c. Their less lucky companions were merely taken prisoners of war. One of them, however, had come very near getting his quietus. A son of Dr. Graham, a boy of about eleven years, seized his father's double-barrelled gun at the first alarm, and hurried out to the fence, the Missourians, who were all thus taken aback, being immediately outside of it. The daring boy, with his Kansas blood up,
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Pate's prisoners and the wounded. (search)
This guard was in great trepidation. The prisoners had thrown themselves on the ground, and the trembling guard also lay down, taking care to get the person of Dr. Graham between his own precious carcass and the enemy. So matters were, when the ruffian to whom I have alluded went to the tent with fierce oaths. Dr. Graham saw hiDr. Graham saw him approach with ferocious expression, and, just at that moment, the ruffian raised his pistol, aiming at the Doctor, who gave a spring just as the piece went off, the ball hitting him in the side, and inflicting a flesh wound. Graham sprang into the ditch of the ravine; and, as he did so, received another ball in his hip. He brokGraham sprang into the ditch of the ravine; and, as he did so, received another ball in his hip. He broke from the camp and fled, fifteen pistol shots being fired after him by the person who first attacked him, assisted by the guard. He got off without further injury, and joined his friends on the hill. The firing had lasted three hours. Only two Free State men were wounded. One of them was shot in the arm, in the early part of
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, chapter 1.27 (search)
know, all bruised about the head, and with his throat partly cut, after he had been dragged, sick, from the house of Ottawa Jones, and thrown over the bank of the Ottawa Creek for dead. About the first of September, I, and five sick and wounded sons, and a son-in-law, were obliged to lie on the ground, without shelter, for a considerable time, and at times almost in a state of starvation, and dependent on the charity of the Christian Indian I have before named, and his wife. I saw Dr. Graham, of Prairie City, who was a prisoner with the ruffians on the 2d of June, and was present when they wounded him, in an attempt to kill him, s he was trying to save himself from being murdered by them during the fight at Black Jack. I know that numerous other persons, whose names I cannot now remember, suffered like hardships and exposures to those I have mentioned. I know well that on or about the 14th of September, 1856, a large force of Missourians and other ruffians, said by Gove