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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for George R. Graham or search for George R. Graham in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 14: Poe (search)
man's magazine, but a year later he quarrelled with Burton and lost his place. From April, 1841, to May, 1842, he edited Graham's magazine. And in 1843 he had for a while some tacit connection with a Philadelphia weekly, The Saturday Museum. In Burton's and in Graham's he published a number of the ablest of his book-reviews and some of the most striking of his tales. At the end of 1839 he brought out at Philadelphia a collection of his tales, in two volumes; and in 1843 a further edition of so he declares, nothing of the arrogance, vanity, and depravity of heart that were commonly attributed to him. And George R. Graham, editor of the magazine that bore his name, testifies that, when he knew him best (in the first half of the forties)f opium. It was as critic that Poe first attracted widespread attention. As editor of the Messenger and Burton's and Graham's his chief function was that of book-reviewer; and much of the work that he did for other periodicals was of the nature
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), chapter 1.9 (search)
from Poe, Longfellow, Holmes, and others. A later Philadelphia magazine was Graham's, established in 1841 by the union of The Casket, which had formerly been owned by George R. Graham and Charles J. Peterson, and Burton's gentleman's magazine, a monthly now remembered chiefly because Poe was for a time associate editor. Poe retained for something over a year a similar position on the new Graham's magazine, and among his successors was the Rev. Rufus W. Griswold. The magazine achieved grecial returns. According to a somewhat dubious tradition its decline began when Graham published a harshly unfavourable review of Uncle Tom's cabin. Among the contributors to Graham's in its best days were Cooper, Longfellow, Lowell, Hawthorne, and Simms. Most of the Southern magazines were still conducted in a spirit of patrihe part of American readers. At times such journals as the Knicker- bocker and Graham's, and even others less successful, boasted lists of contributors quite as dist
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
of story explains why Hawthorne turned to the production of long romances. The age of the Hawthornesque short story had passed. With the fifties had come a new atmosphere. To realize it one has but to read for a time in Godey's lady's Book and Graham's magazine and the annuals and then to turn to Harper's magazine, established in 1850, Putnam's magazine, in 1853, and The Atlantic monthly, in 1857. In England it was the period of Dickens and Thackeray and Reade and George Eliot, the golden the heart of New England, a school teacher with experience in country districts, she wrote with knowledge and conviction of the area of life that she knew. In her long series of stories beginning in the forties with unlocalized romantic tales in Graham's and extending throughout the transition period into the seventies and eighties, and ending with a final collection as late as 1891, one may trace every phase of the American short story in half a century. Her early Atlantic narratives lean dec
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
ond School, the, 389 Gordon, John Brown, 318, 320 Gordon, Rev., William, 104 Gottingen, 33, 110, 112, 133 Gould, Judge, 215 Goulding, F. R., 403 Gower, 3 Grady, Major, 321 Grady, Henry Woodfin, 321-323, 324, 326, 346 Graham, George R., 61, 168 Graham's magazine, 59, 63, 168, 170, 371, 372 Grandfather's chair, 21, 401, 406 Grandissimes, 359 Grandmother's Story of Bunker-Hill Battle, 225, 237 Grant, Gen. U. S., 144, 145, 284 Gray Champion, the, 25, 202 GreaGraham's magazine, 59, 63, 168, 170, 371, 372 Grandfather's chair, 21, 401, 406 Grandissimes, 359 Grandmother's Story of Bunker-Hill Battle, 225, 237 Grant, Gen. U. S., 144, 145, 284 Gray Champion, the, 25, 202 Great Bell Roland, the, 280 Great men, 4 Great South, the, 379 Greek Anthology, 240 Greeley, Horace, 61, 167, 187, 189, 190, 191-193, 266 n. Green, Asa, 152 Green, Duff, 183 Green, Joseph, 149 Grey, William, 363 Griswold, Rufus W., 61, 61 n., 62, 62 n., 64, 167, 168 Groen van Prinsterer, G., 138, 146 Guardian Angel, the, 228, 233 Guizot, 128 Hale, E. E., 374, 385, 401, 404 Hale, Nathan, 184, 185 Hale, Sarah J., 168, 398, 399, 408 Haliburton, Judge, Thomas C