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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Warren Graham or search for Warren Graham in all documents.

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of the 5th Virginia Regiment, Col. Harper commanding, was shot through the breast and still living, and lies in the house used for a hospital for our men. Frederick Palmer, of Company G, Wisconsin Regiment, shot in the right leg. ----Reed, of Company K, 11th Pennsylvania, musket ball in the breast. Just before Mr. Reed was shot down, a cannon ball struck his musket, and bent it into the shape of an S, and cut away part of the barrel, besides driving the splinters into his breast. Warren Graham, Fourth Sergeant of Company B, Wisconsin Regiment, wounded in the left breast, right arm, and left leg. M. F. Hamacker, Company B, 11th Pennsylvania Regiment, shot in left shoulder. James Morgan, Company E, 11th Pennsylvania Regiment, and D. R. Stiles of the same company, were standing together and were both wounded with one grape shot. The Color Sergeant of the Wisconsin Regiment was the first man wounded, but he bravely kept the flag up until some one came to relieve him. L
hem from the rebels in North Missouri. The troops doubtless went on board during the night. From the levee a very interesting spectacle presented itself, at about noon, to hundreds of spectators. On the firing of a signal gun, the steamers Empress, War Eagle, Jennie Deans, Warsaw, and City of Alton, simultaneously backed from the wharf, and dropped anchor in mid-stream. The movement was executed with admirable precision and fine effect. These steamers, with the Louisiana, January, and Graham, constitute the military fleet of eight vessels, to proceed down the Mississippi. Each bears aloft the Stars and Stripes, while the City of Alton, as the flag steamer, shows also the Union Jack and a broad pennon. The gallant vessels attracted much attention, and every movement respecting them was watched with keen interest. At four P. M., the Seventeenth regiment, Illinois, Col. Ross commanding, broke up their encampment at the Abbey track, and marched into the city to Fifth street, an
ainst them. The Iowas and Kansans now came upon the stage of action, and right well did they fight. The former fought like tigers, stood firm as trees, and saved us from utter and overwhelming defeat. Gen. Lyon saw their indomitable perseverance and bravery, and with almost his last breath praised their behavior in glowing terms. Major Porter was all along the line, cheering his men forward, even when bullets fell like hail, and scores were dropping all around him. Companies B, under Lieut. Graham, C, Capt. Mason, who was killed soon after entering into action, F, Capt. Wise, H, Capt. Gottschalk, I, Capt. Herron, and K, Capt. Cook, were in the very thickest of the fight. The three latter were afterward placed in ambush by Capt. Granger of the regulars. Lying down close to the brow of the hill, they waited for another attempt of the enemy to retake their position. On they came, in overwhelming numbers. Not a breath was heard among the Iowas till their enemies came within thirty
ainst them. The Iowas and Kansans now came upon the stage of action, and right well did they fight. The former fought like tigers, stood firm as trees, and saved us from utter and overwhelming defeat. Gen. Lyon saw their indomitable perseverance and bravery, and with almost his last breath praised their behavior in glowing terms. Major Porter was all along the line, cheering his men forward, even when bullets fell like hail, and scores were dropping all around him. Companies B, under Lieut. Graham, C, Capt. Mason, who was killed soon after entering into action, F, Capt. Wise, H, Capt. Gottschalk, I, Capt. Herron, and K, Capt. Cook, were in the very thickest of the fight. The three latter were afterward placed in ambush by Capt. Granger of the regulars. Lying down close to the brow of the hill, they waited for another attempt of the enemy to retake their position. On they came, in overwhelming numbers. Not a breath was heard among the Iowas till their enemies came within thirty