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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 10: Peace movements.--Convention of conspirators at Montgomery. (search)
hn Z. Goodrich, Charles Allen, George S. Boutwell, Theophilus P. Chandler, Francis B. Crowninshield, John M. Forbes, Richard P. Waters. Rhode Island.--Samuel Ames, Alexander Duncan, William W. Hoppin, George H. Browne, Samuel G. Arnold. Connecticut.--Roger S. Baldwin, Chauncey F. Cleveland, Charles J. McCurdy, James T. Pratt, Robins Battell, Amos S. Treat. New York.--David Dudley Field, William Curtis Noyes, James S. Wadsworth, James C. Smith, Amaziah B. James, Erastus Corning, Francis Granger, Greene C. Bronson, William E. Dodge, John A. King, John E. Wool. New Jersey.--Charles S. Olden, Peter D. Vroom, Robert F. Stockton, Benjamin Williamson, Joseph F. Randolph, Frederick T. Frelinghuysen, Rodman M. Price, William C. Alexander, Thomas J. Stryker. Pennsylvania.--James Pollock, William H. Meredith, David Wilmot, A. W. Loomis, Thomas E. Franklin, William McKennan, Thomas White. Delaware.--George B. Rodney, Daniel M. Bates, Henry Ridgley, John W. Houston, William Canno
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baird, Absalom, 1824- (search)
Baird, Absalom, 1824- Military officer; born in Washington, Pa., Aug. 20, 1824; was graduated at West Point in 1849, having studied law before he entered the military academy. He was ordered to Washington, Bainbridge's monument. D. C., in March, 1861, and in May was made assistant adjutant-general. He became aide to General Tyler in the battle of Bull Run, and in November was made assistant inspector-general, with the rank of major. In March, 1862, he became General Keys's chief of staff; and in April he was made brigadier-general of volunterrs, and sent to Kentucky. He commanded a division under General Granger in April, 1863, and was afterwards active in northern Georgia and in the Atlanta campaign. In Sherman's march to the sea he commanded a division of the 14th Army Corps, and also in the advance through the Carolinas. He was brevetted major-general, U. S. A., in March, 1865; promoted brigadier-general and inspector-general in 1885; and retired in 1888.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cabinet, President's (search)
m F. Vilas Jan. 16, 1888 John W. Noble March 5, 1889 Hoke SmithMarch 6, 1893 David R. Francis Aug.24, 1896 Cornelius N. Bliss March 5, 1897 Ethan A. Hitchcock Dec. 21, 1898 March 5, 1901 Postmasters-General. Samuel OsgoodSept.26, 1789 Timothy PickeringAug. 12, 1791 Joseph Habersham Feb.25, 1795 Gideon Granger Nov.28, 1801 Return J. Meigs, Jr March17, 1814 John McLean June 26, 1823 William T. BarryMarch 9, 1829 Amos Kendall May 1, 1835 John M. Niles. May 25, 1840 Francis GrangerMarch 6, 1841 Name.Appointed. Charles A. Wickliffe Sept.13, 1841 Cave Johnson March 6, 1845 Jacob Collamer March 8, 1849 Nathan K. Hall July 23, 1850 Samuel D. Hubbard Aug. 31, 1852 James Campbell March 5, 1853 Aaron V. Brownarch 6, 1857 Joseph Holt March14, 1859 Horatio King Feb. 12, 1861 Montgomery Blair March 5, 1861 William Dennison Sept.24, 1864 Alexander W. RandallJuly 25, 1866 John A. J. Creswell March 5, 1869 Marshall JewellAug. 24, 1874 James N. TynerJuly 12,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chickamauga, battle of (search)
s and concentrated his troops, and formed his line on a slope of Missionary Ridge. Wood and Brannan had barely time to dispose their troops properly, when they were furiously attacked, the Confederates throwing in fresh troops continually. General Granger, commanding reserves at Rossville, hastened to the assistance of Thomas with Steedman's division. The latter fought his way to the crest of a hill, and then turning his artillery upon his assailants, drove them down the southern slope of thter. They returned to the attack with an overwhelming force, determined to drive the Nationals from the ridge, and pressed Thomas most severely. Finally, when they were moving along a ridge and in a gorge, to assail his right flank and rear, Granger formed two brigades (Whittaker's and Mitchell's) into a charging party, and hurled them against the Confederates led by Hindman. Steedman led the charging party, with a regimental flag in his hand, and soon won a victory. In the space of twent
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Forrest, Nathan Bedford 1821-1877 (search)
ward to Pulaski, in Tennessee, destroying the railway; but General Rousseau, at Pulaski, repulsed Forrest after brisk skirmishing several hours, when the raider made eastward, and struck the railway between Tullahoma and Decherd. He was confronted and menaced by National forces under Rousseau, Steedman, and Morgan, and withdrew before he had done much damage. At Fayetteville he divided his forces, giving 4,000 to Buford, his second in command. Buford attacked Athens (Oct. 2-3), which General Granger had regarrisoned with the 73d Indiana Regiment, and was repulsed. Forrest had pushed on to Columbia, on the Duck River, with 3,000 men, but did not attack, for he met Rousseau, with 4,000 men, coming down from Nashville. At the same time, Gen. C. C. Washburne was moving up the Tennessee on steamers, with 4,000 troops, 3,000 of them cavalry, to assist in capturing the invaders. Several other leaders of the National troops, under the command of General Thomas, who had then arrived at N
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, State of (search)
kins. Joseph C. Yates1822Solomon Southwick. De Witt Clinton 1824Samuel Young. 1826William B. Rochester. Nathaniel Pitcher Martin Van BurenDemocrat.1828Smith Thompson. Solomon Southwick Anti-masonic. Enos T. ThroopDemocrat. 1829 1830 Francis Granger Anti-masonic. Ezekiel Williams William L. MarcyDemocrat.1832 Francis GrangerAnti-masonic. 1834 William H. SewardWhig. 1836 Jesse Buel. Isaac S. Smith. William H. SewardWhig1838 William L. MarcyDemocrat. 1840 William C. BouckDemocrat.Francis GrangerAnti-masonic. 1834 William H. SewardWhig. 1836 Jesse Buel. Isaac S. Smith. William H. SewardWhig1838 William L. MarcyDemocrat. 1840 William C. BouckDemocrat. Gerrit Smith. William C. BouckDemocrat 1842 Luther Bradish. Alvan Stewart. Silas Wright. JrDemocrat 1844 Millard FillmoreWhig. Alvan Stewart. John YoungWhig 1846 Silas Wright, JrDemocrat. Ogden Edwards. Henry Bradley. Hamilton FishWhig1848 John A. Dix Democrat. Reuben H. Walworth. William Goodell. Washington HuntWhig 1850Horatio SeymourDemocrat Horatio SeymourDemocrat. 1852 Washington HuntWhig. Minthorne Tompkins. Myron H. ClarkWhig 1854Horatio SeymourDemocrat. Daniel
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Presidential elections. (search)
For foot-note references see page 291.TennDem687,502157,313219Martin Van Buren For foot-note references see page 291.N. Y.Dem189 Henry ClayKyNat R.530,18949John SergeantPaNat. R.49 John FloydVaInd.33,10811Henry LeeMass.Ind.11 William Wirt (c)MdAnti-M.7Amos Ellmaker (c)PaAnti-M.7 William WilkinsPaDem30 1836. Martin Van Buren For foot-note references see page 291.N. Y.Dem761,54924,893170R. M. Johnson (d) For foot-note references see page 291.KyDem147 W. H. HarrisonO.Whig73Francis GrangerN. Y.Whig77 Hugh L. WhiteTennWhig26John TylerVaWhig47 Daniel WebsterMass.Whig736,65614William SmithAlaDem23 Willie P. MangumN. C.Whig11 1840. W. H. Harrison For foot-note references see page 291.O.Whig1,275,017146,315234John Tyler For foot-note references see page 291.VaWhig234 Martin Van BurenN. Y.Dem1,128,70260R. M. JohnsonKyDem48 James G. BirneyN. Y.Lib7,059L. W. TazewellVaDem11 James K. PolkTennDem1 1844. James K. Polk For foot-note references see page 291.TennDem1
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Silver Grays, (search)
Silver Grays, A term applied to the Whigs of New York who supported the administration of President Fillmore, and regarded the slavery question settled by the compromise of 1850. A convention of the administration was held at Syracuse, Sept. 27, 1850, to secure a vindication of the President's policy, etc. The convention resulted in an emphatic majority against the administration; whereupon the chairman, Mr. Granger, and several other administration men, left the convention; as they were elderly men, they, with their following, were immediately dubbed Silver Grays.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
John Randolph sails as minister to Russia......June, 1830 Anti-Mason party hold the first national convention in the United States at Philadelphia, Pa., Francis Granger, of New York, presiding......September, 1830 Second session convenes......Dec. 6, 1830......Senate rejects the award of the King of the Netherlands as arbiS. C.......August, 1835 Name Loco-focos first applied to the Democratic party......1835 Gen. William H. Harrison, of Ohio, nominated for President, with Francis Granger, of New York, for Vice-President, by a State Whig Convention at Harrisburg, Pa.......1835 Samuel Colt patents a revolving pistol ......1835 Twenty-fourtntmen......July‚ÄďAugust, 1864 Successful attack on the harbor of Mobile; Forts Gaines, Morgan, and Powell captured by fleet under Farragut and land forces under Granger......Aug. 5-22, 1864 Maj.-Gen. Philip H. Sheridan appointed to the Army of the Shenandoah......Aug. 7, 1864 English-built cruiser Georgia captured at sea b
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 7: he wanders. (search)
may serve to show what was going on in the mind of the printer as he stood at the case setting up Jacksonian paragraphs. You are aware that an important election is close at hand in this State, and of course, a great deal of interest is felt in the result. The regular Jacksonians imagine that they will be able to elect Throop by 20,000 majority; but after having obtained all the information I can, I give it as my decided opinion, that if none of the candidates decline, we shall elect Francis Granger, governor. This county will give him 1000 majority, and I estimate the vote in the State at 125,000. I need not inform you that such a result will be highly satisfactory to your humble servant, H. Greeley. It was a result, however, which he had not the satisfaction of contemplating. The confident and yet cautious manner of the passage quoted is amusing in a politician not twenty years of age. At Lodi, as at Jamestown, our roving journeyman found work much more abundant than money
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