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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 3, 1864., [Electronic resource] 14 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 8, 1864., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 8, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Granger or search for Granger in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
wing at Chickamauga assaulted time and again on far more difficult ground than the slopes of Cemetery Hill. There were three general assaults which each deserve to rank with Pickett's charge, while the Union defence of Horseshoe Ridge is without parallel in the war. So thin a line of heroes never before successfully withstood such tremendous assaults. Of the whole battle, from opening to close, there was never truer thing written than General Hindman's words in regard to his conflict with Granger's troops: I have never known Federal troops to fight so well. It is just to say, also, that I never saw Confederate soldiers fight better. And Kershaw, of Longstreet's Virginia troops, who had seen all the fighting in the Army of Northern Virginia, said of one of the Confederate assaults which Brannan repulsed: This was one of the heaviest attacks of the war on a single point. Surely the ground of such fighting deserves to be preserved for pilgrimages and historic study. To illustrate
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
wing at Chickamauga assaulted time and again on far more difficult ground than the slopes of Cemetery Hill. There were three general assaults which each deserve to rank with Pickett's charge, while the Union defence of Horseshoe Ridge is without parallel in the war. So thin a line of heroes never before successfully withstood such tremendous assaults. Of the whole battle, from opening to close, there was never truer thing written than General Hindman's words in regard to his conflict with Granger's troops: I have never known Federal troops to fight so well. It is just to say, also, that I never saw Confederate soldiers fight better. And Kershaw, of Longstreet's Virginia troops, who had seen all the fighting in the Army of Northern Virginia, said of one of the Confederate assaults which Brannan repulsed: This was one of the heaviest attacks of the war on a single point. Surely the ground of such fighting deserves to be preserved for pilgrimages and historic study. To illustrate
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twentieth Georgia regiment at the battle of Chickamauga. (search)
aluable information upon this point—particularly as to the parties upon whom blame for the failure should justly rest. Here we lay until about 4 o'clock P. M., when we were ordered to a position up the Chattanooga road to repel an attack from Granger's corps, advancing rapidly, as was reported, from that direction. We found there A. P. Stewart's corps. We took position immediately in his front. Generals Law and Benning (officers of great but most signally unappreciated merit, then and afterwards, by those high in command) rode to the front and, after a hurried reconnoissance, suggested the propriety of bringing up some twenty pieces of artillery and opening upon Granger's advancing forces from directly up the Chattanooga road. It was done with a grand success. If any of his infantry bore part in that evening's fight, it was not in our immediate front—unless, indeed, losing a large number of prisoners may be construed to mean bearing part. They fired no muskets, and their can
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
190, 193. Glover, Col., Thos. J., 120, 133. Gober, Major, 303. Goff, Gen., David, 83. Goodlett, Col., 147, 149, Gordon, Gen. John B., 108, 203, 274, 391. Gordon, Capt. W. B., 134, 168. Gorgas, Gen Josiah, 273, 287. Goulding, Rev. F. R., 428. Govan, Gen, 371. Gracie's, Gen. A., Brigade, 21, 379. Grafton, 83. Graham, Capt. A., 277. Graham, Lt. James R., 60, 64. Graham, Col. R. F., 151, 170, 181, 188. Granbury, J. C., Bishop, 205. Granbury, Gen., 371. Granby, 12. Granger, Gen., 386. Grant, Gen. U. S., 30; career of, 257: On to Richmond of, 258, 341. Granville's Trade Laws, 6. Gravelly Run, Battle of, 21. Greeley on Secession, Horace, 334. Gregg, Gen., Maxcy, 117; his regiment, 14, 394; loss in brigade at Cold Harbor, 19. Gregory, Sergeant E. S., 91. Green, 359. Green, Gen. Nath'l, 12; Johnson's Life of, 6. Grier, Lt., 143. Griggs, Col., Geo. K., 230, 257. Grimball, 104. Grimke, Dr., Thos., 126, 176. Griswold, Harry, 360. Grose, Co