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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for George Granger or search for George Granger in all documents.

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and left of the Williamsburgh road, near the forks, and along theNine-mile road. Peck's brigade was on the left, Devens's brigade in the centre, and Abecrombie's on the right, having two regiments and Brady's battery across the railroad near Fair Oaks, thus forming two lines of battle. Col. Gregg, with the Eighth Pennsylvania cavalry, was in the action, but owing to the nature of the ground could not be much employed. A part of the Eighth Illinois cavalry was with me as an escort. Lieut. Granger acted as my aid, and several private soldiers of that regiment followed me throughout the day. Through all the night of the thirtieth of May there was raging a storm, the like of which I cannot remember. Torrents of rain drenched the earth. The thunder-bolts rolled and fell without intermission, and the heavens flashed with a perpetual blaze of lightning. From their beds of mud and the peltings of this storm, the Fourth corps rose to fight the battle of the thirty-first of May, 186
ss is considerable, though I cannot yet tell how great. The enemy, being much exposed, suffered very severely-one of his batteries being completely disabled, and his infantry line having been driven back several times. My command are eager for the advance. (Signed) John Pope, Major-General. Official report of Colonel Hatch. camp near Farmington, May 10. Lieutenant Marden, A. A.G. Brigade: I had the honor to report, complying with orders to report, with Second regiment to Gen. Granger. Did so, receiving instructions from Gen. Pope to report to General commanding the advance. I reported at twelve o'clock to Gen. Palmer, who ordered me to throw out two companies to the left of the Farmington road, and hold the balance of command in reserve. Our infantry, who had held the field above us, being driven in to the brow of the hill, Gen. Paine ordered the regiment to charge the enemy's batteries. Moving the column to the top of the hill, ordered Major Kuhen, with companies
command taken prisoners were a party who had taken a hand-car, and gone up the track a mile or two to destroy a water-tank. It is presumed they were surprised by some skulkers who were afraid to approach Booneville while Colonel Elliott was there. The charge of burning up five sick men in the depot and handing down Colonel Elliott's name to infamy, I must confess is only in character with General Beauregard's previous statements. He knows better. He knows it is false. The rebellion in which he is a prominent leader must have imbued him with more credulity than reason; a spirit of malicious exaggeration has taken the place of truth. To convict himself of inhumanity, treachery and deception in almost every word, act and deed, he has only to take the combined and concurrent testimony of thousands of his own subalterns and men, especially those who have fallen into our hands as prisoners and the large numbers who have deserted his sinking cause. G. Granger, Brigadier-General.
. Company C--Killed: Corporal Geo. W. Young, private W. H. Arbor. Wounded: Sergeant Chas. Friedeborn, in breast; Corporal Charles Fairfax, in thigh; private Geo. W. Gaugh, in side; James A. Morrow, in leg; John T. Coverdale, in side, severely. Company D--Killed: Private Frederick Shoemaker. Wounded: First Lieut. Robert Kirkup, in arm, severely; Sergeant James Clark, in leg, slight; Sergeant John B. McElhaney, in thigh; Sergeant C. Dillon, in leg; Corporal T. Hettle, in hand; Corporal George Granger, in leg; private John Bourk, in leg; Benjamin Cline, wounded in leg; Valentine Gilbe, in arm; Owen Haley, in arm; John Nolan, in leg; Xavier Stoll, in leg. Company E--Corp. Geo. W. Gentle, wounded in head; Corporal W. Williams, in face; John Garner, A. Carnahan, killed; George A. Peet, dangerously wounded and missing; P. Brady, wounded in foot; Wm. Fischer, leg; H. S. Henneman, foot; J. Koltoff, head; P. Cramig, thigh; J. R. Lamb, leg, slightly; E. Myers, shoulder; T. S. Rice, ar
. Company C--Killed: Corporal Geo. W. Young, private W. H. Arbor. Wounded: Sergeant Chas. Friedeborn, in breast; Corporal Charles Fairfax, in thigh; private Geo. W. Gaugh, in side; James A. Morrow, in leg; John T. Coverdale, in side, severely. Company D--Killed: Private Frederick Shoemaker. Wounded: First Lieut. Robert Kirkup, in arm, severely; Sergeant James Clark, in leg, slight; Sergeant John B. McElhaney, in thigh; Sergeant C. Dillon, in leg; Corporal T. Hettle, in hand; Corporal George Granger, in leg; private John Bourk, in leg; Benjamin Cline, wounded in leg; Valentine Gilbe, in arm; Owen Haley, in arm; John Nolan, in leg; Xavier Stoll, in leg. Company E--Corp. Geo. W. Gentle, wounded in head; Corporal W. Williams, in face; John Garner, A. Carnahan, killed; George A. Peet, dangerously wounded and missing; P. Brady, wounded in foot; Wm. Fischer, leg; H. S. Henneman, foot; J. Koltoff, head; P. Cramig, thigh; J. R. Lamb, leg, slightly; E. Myers, shoulder; T. S. Rice, ar