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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 105 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 100 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 95 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 72 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 71 7 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 70 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 67 9 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 52 2 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 50 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 47 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Gordon Granger or search for Gordon Granger in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 3 document sections:

d formed in an angle, Capt. Totten, who had mounted a six and twelve-pounder upon the overlooking hill, sent a shell right over them; in another minute the second--a twelve-pound shell, a very marvel of gunnery practice — which landed right at their feet, exploding, and scattering the whole body in the most admired disorder. The third, fourth, fifth, and sixth were sent into their midst. The horsemen could not control their horses, and in a minute not an enemy was to be seen anywhere. Capt. Granger, of the artillery, was so pleased with the execution that he rode out to the spot, where he discovered several pools of blood on the ground, as if the shell had done great damage, one double-barrelled shot-gun being bent by the fragments of the shell. The praise of all tongues was upon the magnificent charge of our cavalry. The men, actuated by a supreme disdain for the novices who had but recently left the plough for the musket, determined to give them a real taste of war at the ons
d by the confidence his example inspired. Capt. Granger, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General on my sArtillery, Commanding Light Company F. Captain Gordon Granger, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Ar camp near Rolla, Mo., Aug. 17, 1861. Captain Gordon Granger, United States Army, Acting Adjutant-Gen. Lyon to move my battery to the right--Captain Granger was to place me in position. Three compaf our advance, had collected in masses. Capt. Granger now countermanded my order to move, and by and drove them back with great slaughter, Capt. Granger directing one of my guns. Their broken t me orders to retire. Just at that time Captain Granger came up to me, and we discovered that they were about to renew the attack upon us. Captain Granger rushed to the rear and collected several latter were afterward placed in ambush by Capt. Granger of the regulars. Lying down close to the and Miller, members of the ex-Legislature, Capt. Granger of the regulars, Major Porter of Iowa, Maj[3 more...]
ieut. Graham, C, Capt. Mason, who was killed soon after entering into action, F, Capt. Wise, H, Capt. Gottschalk, I, Capt. Herron, and K, Capt. Cook, were in the very thickest of the fight. The three latter were afterward placed in ambush by Capt. Granger of the regulars. Lying down close to the brow of the hill, they waited for another attempt of the enemy to retake their position. On they came, in overwhelming numbers. Not a breath was heard among the Iowas till their enemies came within r the night. Where so many daring acts and valorous deeds were performed, it were almost impossible to single any one as worthy of especial notice. Among the latter, however, were Capts. Cavender and Miller, members of the ex-Legislature, Capt. Granger of the regulars, Major Porter of Iowa, Major Cloud of Kansas, Capt. Wood of the Kansas cavalry, and Capt. Wright of the Home Guards. Col. Bates, of the Iowa First, who had been confined for several days with a fever and diarrhea, mounted his