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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 37 1 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 21 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
F. McIntosh (m w) 2 3 4 7         16 McRae, Lieut, Thos. B. Huger (m w)   1     6   1 Experimental gun.   8 Jackson (at Quarantine), Lieut. F. B. Renshaw         2       2 Manassas, Lieut. A. F. Warley         1 Carronade.       1 Launch No. 3, Acting Master Telford               1 1 Launch No. 6, Acting Master Fairbanks               1 1 Louisiana State Gun-boats                   Governor Moore, Lieut. Beverley Kennon       2         2 General Quitman, Capt. Alexander Grant         2       2 River Defense Boats.                   Warrior, Capt. John A. Stephenson         1       1 Stonewall Jackson, Capt. Geo. W. Philips           1     1 Defiance, Capt. Joseph D. McCoy         1       1 Resolute, Capt. Isaac Hooper       1 1       2 General Lovell, Capt. Burdett Paris         1       1 R. J. Breckinridge, Capt. James Smith.        
ney, Edward K. Chandler, Daniel Garrity, Simon Stern. Company G--Wounded — Timothy Connors, Charles H. Goodwin, Joshua M. Caswell, Alvah J. Wilson, Phillimon White. Missing-- First Sergeant R. M. Maguire, and Privates John Allen and Edwin Gilpatrick. Company H--Wounded — John R. Cudworth, buckshot in chin; Thomas Thombs, buckshot in left arm ; George H. Green, buckshot in face; Nathaniel Allen, buckshot over right eye. Company I--Wounded--Privates William J. Fleming, left arm; Alexander Grant, left arm;----Hurley and----Wilson. Missing — Privates----Netland,----Towle,----Crowell, all wounded and left on the field. Company K--Killed — William B. Hall, John Dolan. Wounded--Lieut. Carruth, slightly; Privates L. A. Payson, slightly; William Clark, William J. Hudson, Thomas R. Mathers, George H. Wheeler, John W. Nilling. Missing — Wesley Jackson, John P. Ross, (wounded and left on the field,) Charles S. Leonard, David B. Copeland. Total — Killed, four; wounded, thir
infantry, three companies of cavalry, and a section of McAllister's battery, to reconnoitre in front and to the left of our position, in the direction of Pea Ridge, to drive in the enemy's picket and outposts, and avoiding an engagement with a superior force, ascertain, if practicable his position, and then fall back upon our camp. Rapidly moving forward in execution of this order, he had approached within a short distance of the enemy's pickets, when, in pursuance of instructions from Major-Gen. Grant, he was ordered to halt and return his column to camp. On the twenty-ninth, however, a general advance was made in the direction of Pea Ridge and Farmington. The First division, being in advance, was halted about four miles from Monterey, in view of some of the enemy's tents on Pea Ridge. The enemy's pickets fled before our advance, leaving us in possession of the ground they had occupied. Near and in the rear of this point, known as Mickey's White House, we took the position behi
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Introduction — the Federal Navy and the blockade (search)
ral's flagship on the first expedition up the Yazoo. As the Stars and Stripes were run up on the court-house at Vicksburg, July 4, 1863, the Blackhawk, bearing Admiral Porter and his staff, swept proudly up to the levee and received on board General Grant, with many of his officers. They were received with that warmth of feeling and hospitality that delights the heart of a sailor. Outwardly unmoved, Grant received the congratulations of the officers of the navy upon the greatest victory of tGrant received the congratulations of the officers of the navy upon the greatest victory of the war so far — a victory which the river squadron had helped so materially to win. Again the Blackhawk steamed away on active service as Porter's flagship to lead the futile Red River expedition. following their success, had built the Gloire. The British were building four large broadside shins of the Warrior type; others were to follow in the Confederate navy, the Tennessee at Mobile, the Atlanta in Wassaw Sound, the Albemarle in the North Carolina sounds, and the formidable French-built St
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
orce prevented such accomplishment. But the Federal navy's blockade of the Southern ports became ultimately the determining factor in the downfall of the Confederacy. Vicksburg and Port Hudson surrendered as much to Farragut and to Porter as to Grant. Sherman's march to the sea would never have been undertaken had not the Federal fleets already held possession of Port Royal and so strongly invested the harbors of Savannah, Charleston, and Wilmington. In his campaign against Richmond, McClellan sought shelter under the guns of the navy, and Grant was enabled, through the navy's control of the coast, to maintain his base at City Point. Had Jefferson Davis a navy at his command, the result of the internecine struggle might have been far different. It was the blockade as much as the battles that brought to every Southern home the horrible reality of want that follows in the track of war. The people of the North knew no deprivations, but the women and children of the South, before
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
the above engagements. The Benton was hit twenty-five times while supporting Sherman's unsuccessful assault on Vicksburg from the north, and she was Admiral Porter's flagship when he ran by the batteries at the beginning of the maneuver by which Grant approached and invested Vicksburg from the southward, thus accomplishing the fall of the key to the Mississippi. The Louisville, one of the original Eads ironclads U S. Gunboat Benton, tug Fern The Ellet rams. After the General Price became a Federal gunboat, the pilot-house was protected and moved forward and other alterations were made. The Ellet rams continued their useful work. Charles Rivers Ellet took the first vessel past the batteries at Vicksburg after Grant had determined upon his venturesome movement upon the city from the south. Admiral Farragut, who had come up from the Red River, requested General Alfred W. Ellet to let him have two of the ram fleet to run the batteries in order to augment the blockad
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
's fleet would never have reached New Orleans such of them as did not belong to the army were under the orders of Commander John K. Mitchell, C. S. N. They were the Louisiana, sixteen guns, Commander Charles F. McIntosh; McRae, eight guns, Lieutenant Thomas B. Huger; Jackson, ten guns, Lieutenant F. B. Renshaw; Manassas, Lieutenant A. F. Warley, and ten launches. There were two State gunboats: Governor Moore, two guns, Lieutenant Beverly Kennon, and Governor Quitman, two guns, Captain Alexander Grant. Besides these there were six of the so-called River Defense Fleet--the Warrior, Stonewall Jackson, Defence, Resolute, General Lovell, and R. J. Breckinridge--river steamers with bows strengthened for ramming purposes, all but one of which carried a single small smooth-bore gun. They really belonged to the army, and Captain John A. Stephenson was in command. A few unarmed tugs, belonging to the army and navy, were also on hand. This force, if properly officered and manned, migh
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), On the Mississippi and adjacent waters (search)
voy the transport Warner, on which was Lieutenant Simpson of Banks' staff, bearing despatches to Grant, Sherman, and Rosecrans. Near David's Ferry the two gallant little gunboats fought for five houged above Mussel Shoals in keeping open communications and convoying loaded transports. The General Grant, under Acting Ensign J. Watson, with the other sturdy little vessels of the land-locked flote troops near the same place and they returned her fire with fury. Early in January of 1865 the Grant, single-handed, silenced Confederate batteries at Guntersville and Beard's Bluff, Ala. Returning 1865, are, from left to right, the General Sherman, No. 60; the General Thomas, No. 61; the General Grant, No. 62; and the General Burnside, No. 63; all named after the military leaders whose strateort, where she was set on fire and abandoned. For weeks now the fleet was employed in assisting Grant's army that was slowly closing in upon Vicksburg, which stronghold was to fall on the 4th of Jul
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
ar to reduce these defenses, but this could only be done by a combined army and navy attack, and up to the time of the assumption of command of the Union armies by Grant, it was not deemed expedient to spare the troops. Admiral Farragut, on September 5, 1864, was appointed to the command of a naval force to cooperate with the laMercedita and the Keystone State, receiving the former's surrender. The floating battery and the Chicora The C. S.S. Chicora. forces for this purpose, General Grant having signified his belief that the army could be ready by the 1st of October of that year. Admiral Farragut's health not permitting his assumption of this dollected a sufficient force of Confederate troops in the fortifications around the city to require the operations of a regular siege. Nothing was done until General Grant, on the 19th of January, 1865, ordered General Canby to move against Selma or Montgomery, in order to destroy the railroads and prevent the Confederates from b
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
Naval actions along the shore A busy scene on the James, 1864: army tugs 4 and 5 in the foreground; the monitor Onondaga in the offing — with Grant at City Point, the river became the artery for army and navy communication A ferryboat ready for battle Take away the background of this picture of the Commodore Perry, substitute for it the lonely shore of the Carolina sounds or the Virginia rivers lined with men in gray uniforms, and you have an exact reproduction of how this olthirty-five feet in length, could actually dive and be propelled under water and rise to the surface. The motive power was furnished by the crew, who, sitting vis-à--vis on benches, turned a crank The U. S.S. Mendota. From the time General Grant established his headquarters at City Point, there was no rest for the gunboats in the James River. There was an active and determined foe to contend with, and alertness was the watchword for every officer and man in the Federal flotilla. Un
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