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The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1864., [Electronic resource] 54 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Charlie W. Grant or search for Charlie W. Grant in all documents.

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Vandalism of the enemy. All accounts from Prince George represent that the county is being thoroughly scoured by the worse than vandal foe who now invade that section. Every house is visited, and not an article of value is overlooked. The enemy's cavalry horses are turned into large fields of wheat, corn, and oats, and allowed to trample and graze the crops as they like. Yesterday among the prisoners captured, was one cut throat looking fellow, who tell into the hands of Charlie W. Grant of the 45th Georgia.--This Union restorer, had on his person the Family Bible of Mr. Geo M. Browder, a well known citizen of Prince George. Mr. Browder resides near the plankroad, about four miles from Petersburg, and fled from his home a few days since to escape the vengeance of the despoilers. We saw his precious Bible restored to him yesterday evening at the office of the Provost Marshal, and we witnessed the joyful emotions which a sight of its sacred and familiar pages produced.
Grant's brutality. --The following is an extract of a young soldier's letter dated. In trenches, hear Gaines's Mill, Jone 5," in which the repulsive brutality of Grant to his soldiers is described by an eye witness: But the most awful thing that I ever knew of, and that I do know of, is that Grant never buries his dead Grant to his soldiers is described by an eye witness: But the most awful thing that I ever knew of, and that I do know of, is that Grant never buries his dead or attends to his wounded. There are some of his men, killed and wounded in front of our works since the 1st, and they are still there as they fell, the poor wounded beseeching us to give them water, which we are not allowed to do in consequence of the enemy's sharpshooters. One fellow last night hollowing but, "Reb," "if you wilGrant never buries his dead or attends to his wounded. There are some of his men, killed and wounded in front of our works since the 1st, and they are still there as they fell, the poor wounded beseeching us to give them water, which we are not allowed to do in consequence of the enemy's sharpshooters. One fellow last night hollowing but, "Reb," "if you will only give me a canteen of water I will give you my watch." There we see them, day after day, in the hot boiling sun, without the slightest shelter upon them; and the dead are decomposing rapidly; all the bodies are black and smell awful. Did you ever hear anything in your life so horrible?
ture of Petersburg" and the great movements of Grant: The capture of Petersburg is a very impoLee, Senior, in relation to his victories over Grant between the Wilderness and Cold Harbor, we sharuins of Virginia. The next movements of Gen. Grant will be of great importance. He has severalsburg" with an editorial on "the operations of Grant's army" and the "glorious change in the situatn of the rapid character of the work which General Grant has lately performed, the reader should trhe preceding three days. On Sunday evening General Grant and the army were on the Chickahominy withack upon Chickasaw Bluff failed under Sherman, Grant tried the canal opposite the city. When it waack, who can doubt the same ultimate success? Grant will try all ways, and hold fast to that whichor to cut Lee off from the Southwest, and that Grant, having united Butler's column to his own, is y of the rebel defence, and from the fact that Grant is pushing forward his troops to "follow up th[10 more...]
The cause of Grant's failure. The New York Herald tells us that but for the interference of Old Abe, McClellan (the flagged, hunted, kicked and cuffed McClellan) would have taken Richmond two years ago; and that but for the same interference now Grant would have taken it two weeks ago. In both instances according to the HeralGrant would have taken it two weeks ago. In both instances according to the Herald, he was prompted by jealousy of his own Generals, and the wish to secure his own re-nomination and re-election. The following paragraph is rich beyond expression, in mortification and chagrin: "By that act, and later ones of the same nature, he crushed a commander who had the ability to put the rebellion down. Then we had who had not that ability, and for whom he had no fear. Under those commanders matters got to such a desperate shait that Congress was compelled to act, and called Grant to the command of our armless in that choice the President could only acquiesce. But he has already begun term ploy against this General the very tactics by which