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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 16: the battle of Fair Oaks (search)
ng his empty scabbard for a cane. He had a fox-skin robe, which had been on his saddle, thrown across his free arm. Why weary yourself, Charlie, with that robe I asked. To cover me up if I should have to stop, he smilingly answered. Dr. Grant dressed his leg and provided him with a stretcher. I preferred to walk. En route I encountered a soldier among the wounded with his fingers broken and bleeding. He cried out with rain. Seeing me he drew near with sympathy. You are worse ofabove the wound. They then bore me to the amputating room, a place a little grewsome withal from arms, legs, and hands not yet all carried off, and poor fellows with anxious eyes waiting their turn. On the long table I was nicely bolstered; Dr. Grant, who had come from the front, relieved the too-tight tourniquet. A mixture of chloroform and gas was administered and I slept quietly. Dr. Palmer amputated the arm above the elbow. When I awoke I was surprised to find the heavy burden was go
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 17: Second battle of Bull Bun (search)
ook place while I was absent from the army. The administration now made a shift of policy. John Pope was brought from the Mississippi Valley and made the peer of McClellan, commanding all the armies above named except his. Halleck, under whom Grant, Pope, and others had won laurels in the Mississippi Valley, was called to Washington and assigned to duty as general-in-chief. After this, Abraham Lincoln, endeavoring to follow, not lead, a changing public conviction, often lowered his head munications with Pope cut off. Stuart captured provisions, and carried off Pope's important orders. He then returned to Lee, the way he had come, with the detail of our plans in his possession. Lee acted quickly, making a bold move like that of Grant at Vicksburg, having on the face of it but few reasons in its favor. He ordered Stonewall Jackson, on August 25th, to cross the Rappahannock above Waterloo; move around Pope's right flank; strike the railroad in the rear; while Longstreet must d