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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 13: General E. V. Sumner and my first reconnoissance (search)
s of action. They said everywhere where the echo of their voices could reach: Come on, we defy you! We are in earnest. We mean war! We have struck for independence! Their leaders were too ardent, too determined, too well prepared in plan and purpose to accept any sort of compromise. They had no patience whatever with the Unionists and half Unionists among themselves. And, indeed, we ought from every military conception to have accepted this gage of combat as much as possible, as did Grant, Sherman, Thomas, and Sheridan at later dates. But we must remember that in January, 1862, the country had not yet so decided, and our Eastern forces were far behind the Western in the wish to free the slaves. It is for this reason that so many veteran soldiers, and among them those who were even then loyal to humanity, maintained that McClellan was doing his simple duty and could not be censured for the politico-military course which he at that time was obliged to pursue. In order to p
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 14: the Peninsular campaign begun; Yorktown (search)
ashioned and well-merited naval pride with which our brave officers and men had regarded their well-manned and wellarmed ships. The Monitor thus far was thought to have succeeded only in worrying the gigantic enemy and causing a temporary withdrawal. Nobody then believed it the final contest. Of course, Admiral Goldsboro and his men bravely stayed in Hampton Roads, ready to die there if need be; but McClellan could not get that strong, constant, energetic, sanguine help for Yorktown that Grant had had from Commodore Foote's fleet at Fort Henry, or that was subsequently rendered the army by Admirals Porter and Farragut on the Mississippi and at Mobile. Johnston had two forces to watch-McDowell on the Fredericksburg line of approach to Richmond and McClellan landing at Ship Point near Fortress Monroe. The Confederate general Magruder, having Johnston's advance troops, had seized and fortified the line of the Warwick and made that swampy stream the meeting point of the two great
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 16: the battle of Fair Oaks (search)
ding general has left recorded for not at this time pushing forward his whole strength, I still think that his headquarters were too far away, and that just then and there he lost a great opportunity. General French's medical director, Surgeon Gabriel Grant, close up to the troops, was operating under fire For this, Dr. G. Grant received the Congress Medal of Honor. beside a large stump. IIe there bound up my arm. I found my brother shot through the thigh, just able to limp along by usinDr. G. Grant received the Congress Medal of Honor. beside a large stump. IIe there bound up my arm. I found my brother shot through the thigh, just able to limp along by using his empty scabbard for a cane. He had a fox-skin robe, which had been on his saddle, thrown across his free arm. Why weary yourself, Charlie, with that robe I asked. To cover me up if I should have to stop, he smilingly answered. Dr. Grant dressed his leg and provided him with a stretcher. I preferred to walk. En route I encountered a soldier among the wounded with his fingers broken and bleeding. He cried out with rain. Seeing me he drew near with sympathy. You are worse off
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 27: Chattanooga and the battle of Missionary Ridge (search)
but the preliminary steps to the execution of Grant's plan of operations. This embraced a battl morning of October 29, 1863, Sherman received Grant's dispatch while on the line of the Memphis & disaster; yet the most of us were inspired by Grant's quiet confidence and plans. Little by littl Sherman on our extreme left were in position, Grant concluded to occupy the attention of the enemy, appeared to us to be pleading earnestly with Grant. He was overheard to say: It will not do for ents harder to reach than those of Vicksburg. Grant, who was at times certainly distinguished for been hotly engaged and suffered severe loss. Grant then waited until I could get into position. he war) was a little warped in his estimate of Grant, so that I think his dispatch from Washington here in the West were waiting to see what General Grant was going to do. We believed he was proposSherman set us in motion against Johnston, and Grant in the East began his more dreadful campaign a[31 more...]