hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Daily Dispatch: June 15, 1864., [Electronic resource] 50 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 50 results in 8 document sections:

It appears that all the reports of the fight at Riddle's Shop, on Monday, were incorrect, and that, instead of driving our troops, the Yankees were finally themselves driven by our infantry several miles. We still hold the Malvern Heights, and Grant is reported to have gone to Wesfever, full thirty miles from Richmond by the road, in Charles City county. This is near the point to which McClellan retreated after he was whipped away from the front of Richmond. The reports of the demoralizatiheavy loss, capturing five hundred prisoners, besides the wounded. The enemy retreated in confusion, apparently, by the route he came, leaving his dead and wounded on the field. At daylight this morning, it was discovered that the army of Gen. Grant had left our front. Our skirmishers were advanced between one and two miles, but failing to discover the enemy, were withdrawn. A body of cavalry and some infantry, from long Bridge, advanced to Riddle's shop and were driven back this evening
The Daily Dispatch: June 15, 1864., [Electronic resource], Upward Tendency of Gold in New York (search)
Upward Tendency of Gold in New York Northern papers of the 11th instant have been received in this city. Gold in New York, on the 10th, went up to 200, closing at 199. When the Yankees hear that Grant has placed several more miles between himself and Richmond than lay stretched out before him last week, it will doubtless send gold up to a figure that will render greenbacks a comparatively worthless drug in the market.
Movements of Yankee troops. --The great body of the Yankee troops left Morris and Folly Islands some days age, and it has been tained that a large number of vounels sailed from Hilton Head Monday last. They probably contain troops destined for Grant or perhaps for the Georgia cost, to work off some of their had humor over the loss of the Warts Witch.
rgetown, Cynthiana, (where they burned a warehouse,) and Williamstown, the latter place on the Lexington Pike, within thirty miles of Cincinnati. A force of cavalry, 700 strong, entered Paris on Wednesday without resistance. The rebels occupy the rathole near Lexington. They are also reported to be between Crab Orchard and Stamford. " Lincoln has been verbally informed of his nomination, and replied: "I know no reason to doubt that I shall accept the nomination tendered, and yet, perhaps, I should not declare definitely before reading and considering what is called the platform" The Herald attacks Lincoln with great bitterness, and calls for Grant, McClellan, Sherman, Hancock, Thomas, "or any other man," to oppose him with. Sheridan's raiding party consists of the 1st and 2d divisions of his cavalry, under Gens Torbett and Gregg. "It is one of the most hazardous, and, if successful, one of the most beneficial expeditions of the war." Whither bound, we are not told.
The advance on Atlanta. The well deliberated and carefully calculated programme of that coterie of warriors, statesmen, and rebellion crushers — Grant, Lincoln, and Seward, et id omne genus--was to seize Atlanta and Richmond at once, and thus make a simultaneous crush of the whole affair, and settle the business of President making after it was a lover. In an editorial on this subject, the Atlanta Confederacy of June 7th, says: Fighting had already begun in Spotsylvania county, Viras not is not, and will not be in danger. We sincerely believe that the echo of a Yankee gun will never be heard except from a point outside of its peacefully entrenched limits. It Richmond is held as well we shall be satisfied. In the meantime we are constantly punishing Grant in that quarter. If Johnston can "hold here, while Lee skins there," we are doing well enough, and the Yankees will abandon both magnificent failures before another Fourth of July celebration is held in New England
e repulsed on the 11th by Stuart and Fitz Lee. Grant's losses (official) up to this time 35,000. Fy, May 14.--Partial attack by Lee successful. Grant swung away from our left to the railroad. t indecisive. Friday, May 20--No fighting Grant still swinging his columns around our right. Royal and Tappahannock Saturday, May 21.--Grant occupies Milford Station and Bowling Green. Hg Anderson's division. Wednesday, May 25--Grant destroys Central railroad, and swings fortificmies in line of battle. Thursday, May 26--Grant re-crossed the North Anna, and again moving to our right. Thursday, May 27--Grant's left crossed the Pamunkey, our army rapidly moving in a Old Church, by Federals. Monday, May 30--Grant entrenching on North and West of Tolsotemay cron. Keith mortally wounded Butler reinforcing Grant.--Enemy driven from Ashland by Hampton--75 priee feeble night assaults. Sunday, June 5--Grant's flag of truce for burying the dead; at night[4 more...]
The Daily Dispatch: June 15, 1864., [Electronic resource], Upward Tendency of Gold in New York (search)
en shut up by the Government. Gen Banks delivered a speech on the 27th before the State Convention, in which he highly applauded the radical measures of that usurping body. The Erais certain that the Confederacy is on its very last legs. It will be observed, however, from the following, that what is going to utterly extinguish it has not yet quite taken place. "We believe (it says) that the days of the boasted Southern Confederacy are well nigh numbered. The armies of the Union are moving on, and the final great struggle is in actual progress. The results of it thus far, leave little or no doubt of the final result. With Grant successful in Virginia; with Sherman successful In Northern Georgia, and with Gen Banks successful west of the Mississippi, there is little left on which the rebels can build further extravagant expectations of success" Mr. Placide Canoege, one of the editors of the Courrier, had been expelled from the city, and had left for Pascagonia.
n of the actual state of affairs, and upon the impression thus derived they base their articles. In these very articles, for instance, every one of them speaks of Grant's "splendid strategy," as if it had ever once compelled Lee to abandon a position before Grant himself had withdrawn from his front; as if it had ever once compellGrant himself had withdrawn from his front; as if it had ever once compelled Lee to give way; as if, in every case, Lee had not followed Grant, instead of retreating before him. The tone throughout would lead to the inference that Lee was falling back to his defences around Richmond, with an army still strong, it is true, yet beaten in every engagement. In a word, these papers but repeat the tale of theGrant, instead of retreating before him. The tone throughout would lead to the inference that Lee was falling back to his defences around Richmond, with an army still strong, it is true, yet beaten in every engagement. In a word, these papers but repeat the tale of the Yankees, which everybody here knows to be a monstrous falsehood, and which is now showing itself to be such. With all their experience of Yankee mendacity, at each repetition they yield the same credence that they did in the beginning. The Yankees have always been more sensitive to the opinion of the world than any other peo