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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 22 0 Browse Search
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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Hon. Lemuel Shaw. (search)
Medford, January 3, 1861. To the Hon. Lemuel Shaw,--By this mail I send you three pamphlets, for which I ask a candid perusal. With deep sadness I saw your respected and influential name signed to an address in favor of repealing the Personal Liberty Bill. I trust you will not deem me disrespectful if I ask whether you have reflected well on all the bearings of this important subject. Perhaps you may consider me, and those with whom I labor, as persons prone to look only on one side. Grant that it is so — is it not the neglected side? is it not the right side? And are not you yourself, in common with all human beings, liable to look upon things too much from one point of view? I presume that your social environment is almost entirely conservative; and conservative of habits and stereotyped sayings, rather than of the original principles on which the government of this country was founded. Have you carefully examined and duly considered the other side? This mutual agreemen
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
end, and wishing to give her pleasure. The old music-box is very dear to me. Its powers are limited, but what it does say it says very sweetly; and the memories it sings to me are the dearest of all .... We had quite a glorification here over Grant's election. We had a really handsome procession of five hundred men bearing flags and gay-colored lanterns, and attended by a band of music from Boston. I had no idea they would come up so far as our house; but as we had subscribed, as they tho door, David was exercising his lungs at another. A crowd of foreigners were following the procession in a discomfited state of mind, and seeing us so jubilant they called out, Three cheers for the nigger President! a curious title to bestow on Grant, who has never manifested the slightest interest in the colored people. But I don't want him to be a nigger President. I simply want him to see that equal justice is administered to all classes of people, and I have great hopes he will do that.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. Wayland, 1872. I wanted to write a hurrah as soon as it was certain the ship of state had safely passed that coalition snag, Referring to President Grant's reelection. but was prevented from time to time. Then came that awful fire in Boston, and put one out of the mood of hurrahing. But that conflagration, terrible as it was, was not so disastrous as would have been the restoration of Democrats and rebels to power. And not only have we cause for congratulation that a present danger is escaped, but we have reason to be devoutly thankful for this new proof that the people are capable of self-government. About the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, you and I, as usual, agree. I have taken a lively interest in it, and have been a member of the Boston society from the beginning. I have not made up my mind about the Darwinian theory, but I have long felt that man does not sufficiently recognize his kindred with animals. If they were tende
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
ow the real facts of the case; but this I do know, that General Jackson was in the habit of making nominal treaties with any Indians who could be brought by grog to sign a paper, which was forthwith declared to be an official treaty concluded with the government of the tribe. Just the same as if the government of France or England should enter into negotiations with General Butler, or Boss Tweed, and then claim that the arrangement was binding on the government of the United States. General Grant has disappointed me. His Indian policy looked candid and just on paper; but he does not seem to have taken adequate care that it should be carried out. The Modocs have formerly had a good name as peaceable neighbors; but they have been driven from place to place, and finally pushed into a barren corner, where the soil did not admit of their raising sufficient for a subsistence. They were driven to desperation by starvation, and wearied out with promises that were never fulfilled. Poor
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To the same. (search)
d vexed topic, and I knew, however tenderly and reverentially I might write, nothing would satisfy him but the acknowledgment that he had been entirely in the right; because he never for a moment ceased to believe himself so. It is true that President Grant, since his second election, has done many things, and left still more undone, which tend to confirm Mr. Sumner's estimate of him. But, as I again and again wrote to Mr. Sumner, the question was not whether General Grant was a fitting candidaGeneral Grant was a fitting candidate for the presidency, but whether it was safe to restore power in our national councils to Democrats and rebels. He believed that Democrats and rebels had met with a great change of heart; but I thought, and still think,.there was superabounding evidence that they were still essentially in the same state of mind as ever. I thought then, and I think now, that artful politicians could not have so imposed upon Mr. Sumner if it had not been for the state of his health. If he had been in perfect
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Index. (search)
5, 264 ; cultivates cheerfulness, 196 ; reads the Spanish Gypsy, 197; her sixty-seventh birthday, 198; on Fourier and. the labor question, 199; her jubilation over Grant's election, 200; reads Taine's papers on art, 200 ; her Freedmen's book and the American Missionary Association, 201; her aversion to newspaper publicity, 201; her judgment of George Sand, 205; lines to George Thompson, 206; her appeal to Mr. Sumner in behalf of the rights of women, 208; on Grant's reflection, 213; on the treatment of animals, 214; on the Indian question, XX., 218-221; in favor of the prohibitory law, 221; reads Mrs. Somerville's Life, and Mill's Autobiography, 222, and A pres S., house of, gutted by rioters, 178. Giles, Governor, message of, to Virginia Legislature, 132. Girl's book. The, VII. Goethe and Bettine, 50, 51, Grant's (President U. S.) election, 199; reelection, 213; his Indian policy, 220. Griffith, Miss, Mattie, emancipates her slaves, 89-91; her Autobiography of a female
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Standard and popular Library books, selected from the catalogue of Houghton, Mifflin and Co. (search)
ustrated. $1.50. Charles Dudley Warner. My Summer in a Garden. 16mo, $1.00. Illustrated. $1.50. Saunterings. 18mo, $1.25. Back-Log Studies. Illustrated. $1.50. Baddeck, and that Sort of Thing. $1.00. My Winter on the Nile. 12mo, $2.00. In the Levant. 12mo, $2.00. Being a Boy. Illustrated. $1.50. In the Wilderness. 75 cents. William A. Wheeler. Dictionary of the Noted Names of Fiction. $2.00. Edwin P. Whipple. Works. Critical Essays. 6 vols., $9.00. Richard Grant white. Every-Day English. 12mo, $2.00. Words and their Uses. x2mo, $2.00. England Without and Within. 12mo, $2.00. Shakespeare's Complete Works. 3 vols. cr. 8vo. (In Press.) Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney. Faith Gartney's Girlhood. 12mo, $1.50. Hitherto. 12mo, $1.50. Patience Strong's Outings. l2mo, $1.50. The Gayworthys. 12mo, $1.50. Leslie Goldthwaite. Illustrated. 12mo, $1.50. We Girls. Illustrated. 12mo, $1.50. Real Folks. Illustrated. 12mo, $1.50.