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The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1865., [Electronic resource], President's message.--General Grant's report. (search)
President's message.--General Grant's report. In our telegraphic columns of yesterday was a very brief synopsis of President Johnson's message to the Senate, and General Grant's report to the President, both relative to the condition of the Southern States. In view of the great importance attached to these documents, we publish them this morning in full needs it sorely. House bill entitled a bill for the compensation of John H. Allen was read twice and referred to the Committee on General Grant's report to the President, both relative to the condition of the Southern States. In view of the great importance attached to these documents, we publish them this morning in full needs it sorely. House bill entitled a bill for the compensation of John H. Allen was read twice and referred to the Committee on General Laws.--Subsequently taken up and passed. Mr. offered a joint resolution to request the Governor to represent to the Post-master-General of the United States the present condition of the mail facilities in this State--that many of the members of this General Assembly are without the means of communicating with their families and constituents — and that the public and private interest demands the speedy restoration of the and urge him to consideration and relief to us in the matter
The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1865., [Electronic resource], President's message.--General Grant's report. (search)
The President's message and General Grant's report. These documents will be found in our paper this morning, and will give much satisfaction to Southern readere will only make the freedman worse off and more miserable than he is. General Grant's letter to the President is honorable alike to his judgment and his sense egard to numbers, is sufficient to maintain order." Even this, we are sure, General Grant does not consider necessary for the preservation of order among the white cld have no protection from the colored soldier." This shows plainly what is General Grant's view of the necessity of the presence of the military. This "idea" of the "late slave," which has been widely disseminated in the Southern States, General Grant believes has come from the agents of the Freedmen's Bureau; an institution wat are the best answers to the ravings of the Congressional fanatics. What General Grant says is worth something; and that is put forth like a shield to protect the
his high place. He knows that is as necessary in the administration of an empire as in the command of an army. General Grant will be the next President, should he live long enough, as there is every hope that he will, and as his good fortune, thus far, indicates that he will. We believe in fortune almost to the point of superstition, and General Grant is the most fortunate man since Sylla. It was Mazarin, we believe, (or was it Richelieu?) who always inquired of a general whom he was aself more upon his uninterrupted good fortune than upon his genius. Therefore we have high authority for our faith. General Grant, then, will live, and he will be President. He has already expressed himself favorable to the reconstruction of the n. Such old squaws as Thad. Stevens and Sumner, who did none of the fighting, follow but their instincts in what they are doing now. But Grant is a man of different temper. He has no private griefs to interfere with his conduct as a public man.
The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1865., [Electronic resource], President's message.--General Grant's report. (search)
Latest News by mail.President's message--General Grant's report. In our telegraphic columns of yesterday was a very brief synopsis of President Johnson's message to the Senate, and General GranGeneral Grant's report to the President, both relative to the condition of the Southern States. In view of the great importance attached to these documents, we publish them this morning in full. President's the President. The attention of the Senate is invited to the accompanying report from Lieutenant-General Grant, who recently made a tour of inspection through several of the States whose inhabitants participated in the rebellion. Andrew Johnson. Washington, December 18, 1865. General Grant's report. Headquartersarmies of the United States. Washington, D. C., December 18, 1865. Hirried out, and would relieve from duty and pay a large number of employees of the Government. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General.
epulse, in the Senate to-day.--Mr. Sumner, who had expected to advance his cause by procuring the publication of reports of executive agents who have traversed the South since the practical close of the war, was badly set back. The report of General Grant, based upon actualities of a very late day, being sent in to the Senate, created a great sensation. To an experienced observer, the appearance of things on the Republican side indicates what Jack Falstaff denominated a state of general. "dissolution and thaw," looking to a division on the main question, unless the radicals abate their haughty pretensions. The Republican breaks ground this evening against General Grant. It has also, by indirection in the nature of special pleading, done so to the Administration. The President has approved the sentence of a military court held in Georgia, wherein a colored man called Isaac was sentenced to be hung for killing his former master. It appears Isaac ran away from his mast
The funeral of Hon. Thomas Corwin. Washington, December 20. --The funeral of the late Governor Corwin took place this afternoon. Among the pall- bearers were Chief Justice Chase, Lieutenant-General Grant, Hon. W. H. Seward, Hon. Reverdy Johnson, Hon. Thaddeus Stevens and other prominent and distinguished individuals.
The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1865., [Electronic resource], President's message.--General Grant's report. (search)
effect of the President's message and General Grant's report — Carl Schurz's report--Southern representation--Mr. Harris--Appropriations to be cut down--Naval Academy--tariff, &c. Washington, December 20. --The President's message and General Grant's report on the condition of affairs in the South are havinGeneral Grant's report on the condition of affairs in the South are having a very marked effect in both Houses, though the radicals see nothing in it to change their views. Carl Schurz's report, sent yesterday to the Senate, is quite minute, and takes pretty strong ground against trusting the affected loyalty of the Southern people. He differs from General Grant in his rose-colored report, and is General Grant in his rose-colored report, and is not so much in favor of immediate restoration as General Howard. The Clerk of the House of Representatives has received certificates of election of Southern members only from North Carolina, 7; Louisiana, 4; Mississippi, 2; Tennessee, 7; Virginia, 6, and Arkansas, 1. Some of these have been referred to the select committee.