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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
was ordered off with the cavalry to go behind Grant's army. The infantry was absorbed by Breckenres Hancock, claiming to be a scout attached to Grant's army. He was captured under circumstances wal actors now change. General Lee, pressed by Grant's overwhelming numbers, as soon as he learns t holding the defences until the troops sent by Grant could arrive. Early's forces after their sevester, but the Federals did not push on. General Grant expected that Early would be recalled to Rt a single word to say in adverse criticism of Grant's orders or of Hunter's cruelties! While Mcd would shelter him under some instructions of Grant's, which ordered him to be cautious, and not aek, and prepared to send some of his troops to Grant. Early now planned and executed one of the moal Lee to Petersburg. About the same time General Grant withdrew a large part of Sheridan's infants marked by excessive barbarity. Not only was Grant's order for the wholesale destruction of priva[27 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland line in the Confederate Army. (search)
new rendezvous at Staunton, to be called Camp Maryland, under Major-General Arnold Elzey. This order and this effort accomplished nothing. General Elzey established himself at Staunton with his staff, and no sufficient number of men ever reported to organize a single company. At Hanover Junction I got together the troop above described. When the army fell back to the line of the South Anna after the battle of the Wilderness, in May, 1864, I was ordered off with the cavalry to go behind Grant's army. The infantry was absorbed by Breckenridge, where it did splendid service, and was designated by General Lee in orders, the gallant battalion; and the artillery assigned to infantry or cavalry according to its equipment. I retained the Baltimore Light (Second Maryland) with the cavalry as the Maryland Line during Early's Valley and Maryland Campaign of 1864. The reasons why the Marylanders could not be collected into one command were as manifest to me in 1862-64 as they are now
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Libby prison. (search)
clipping from a newspaper had been sent to him after he had prepared his paper, giving an incident of considerable interest, which he desired to read to the meeting, and on being informed by the President that the meeting would be pleased to hear it, he read the following extract from a letter written by M. Quad in the Detroit Free Press of a recent date]: One of the occupants of the Castle, in the winter of 1864-5, was a Federal named James Hancock, claiming to be a scout attached to Grant's army. He was captured under circumstances which seemed to prove him a spy, and while waiting for his case to be investigated he was sent to Castle Thunder. Hancock was a jolly, rollicking fellow, having wonderful facial expression and great powers of mimicry. One evening, while singing a song for the amusement of his fellow-prisoners, he suddenly stopped, threw up his hands, staggered, and fell like a bag of sand to the floor. There was great confusion at once, and as some of the men i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery service. (search)
he fuse, however, was only reached during the fall of 1864, and before that period the percussionshell had a fuse-plug specially fitted to it at the arsenal, and the supply furnished was very small. The scarcity and bad quality of our rifle-ammunition gave security to the enemy on many occasions where he could have been seriously annoyed, if not materially damaged. When Bragg invested Chattanooga, in October 1863, the Confederate guns with good ammunition could have reached every foot of Grant's crowded camps, and with an abundance of it could have made them untenable. The effort which was made only showed how much demoralization and harm an effective shelling might have accomplished. In many other instances the Confederate artillery was amiable and forbearing by force of necessity, one illustration of which will be sufficient. At Bermuda Hundreds the enemy erected a signal-tower of open frame-work, about a hundred and twenty feet high, from the top of which the Confederate lin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
sed to detach the troops asked for, though he knew that General Grant could not make any serious demonstration on his front, owing to Grant's communication with his base of supplies being destroyed by the writer of this burning a mile of railroad tree attempt to take Vicksburg in the rear by the march of General Grant through Mississippi by the way of Holly Springs, Abbeyvt to have opened General Pemberton's eyes to the fact that Grant was trying to kill two birds with one stone, viz., open thedid, with about 10,000 men, cut his way out in spite of General Grant's cordon. That sturdy lion, General Johnston, pertinacare very few Vicksburg soldiers who do not believe that General Grant was permitted to cross the river nearly unmolested, whie reconnoissance detail, inadequate to the duty of checking Grant, tried to keep the Federal army back. If common discretioneen averted. The whole series of fights from the time that Grant crossed the river until the surrender of Vicksburg was a fa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
o the Mississippi, on the left. General Johnston had an available force to defend this entire line of only about 19,000 men. There was opposed to him, under the ablest leaders of the Union, General Anderson, his early friend at West Point; General Grant, who had seized Paducah, Ky.; General W. T. Sherman, General Thomas and General Wm. Nelson, aggregating a force of 34,000 volunteers. General Johnston, by exaggerating his force and a skillful disposition of it, held against fearful odds tgrand, intellectually great, morally sublime, his life was devoted to duty. Indeed, in the conscientious discharge of that duty he died upon the field of Shiloh in a moment of victory, when I firmly believe had he lived but half an hour longer, Grant would have been a prisoner. I loved him so that I dare not trust myself to speak of him as my heart would prompt me. As I have said on another occasion, when he came to us it appeared to me that a great pillar had been put under the Confederacy;
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
t was not less than that which forbade it. General Grant, when he learned of Sigel's defeat, had hiforward from West Virginia to Harper's Ferry. Grant sent up the other two divisions of the Sixth c holding the defences until the troops sent by Grant could arrive. Early's forces after their severe and had caused two corps to be detached by Grant to oppose him. A much larger force than his ow This act of Hunter's was not in obedience to Grant's instructions, but rather in contravention ofand at his own request, made upon finding that Grant had determined practicably to supersede him. Tnd of all the forces gathered to crush Early. Grant had come up himself to see the situation. He out of the Valley. The large detachments that Grant had made to Sheridan enabled Lee to order Kersgor and skill with which they were handled. Grant now informed Sheridan that his own progress at the mountains and move on Charlottesville, as Grant desired. He therefore retired down the Valley[14 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 48 (search)
urg. It was lucky for the amour propre of our General-in-Chief, that his peer, Grant, did not mass his troops into columns of attack, and walk right in on the Jacksree to enter upon the work of peace instead of the work of hate and war. General Grant had missed his chance. If he had pushed pellmell into Vicksburg with Pembe very skilled in reading the signal messages of Commodore Porter's fleet to General Grant's headquarters and vice versa; in fact, there seemed to be no difficulty in the Federals at any of the signal stations. He reported that it was a part of Grant's plan to make a charge up the river road that ran between Fort Hill and the wathe iron swept area of the now consumed depot. Of all the cannonading that General Grant ordered, the least effective, for the cost, was the bombardment by the flee sunshine and rest. After all the care and devotion I gave to my steed, one of Grant's pilferers borrowed him the day of the surrender. If the mules had a hard ti
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 50 (search)
second in command, put in motion on the morning of the 3d of April, 1862, the Army of the Mississippi, to offer battle to the invaders of our soil. The attack was to have been made on the 6th, before Buell, who was marching to the assistance of Grant, at Pittsburg Landing, could possibly reach him, but owing to the bad roads, the Confederates were unable to reach the destined point in time. Resting for the night in order of battle, a short distance from the enemy's camp, with only now and thfter his horse was shot from under him. Throughout that day, the right, under Bragg, did not sustain a reverse, but took position after position in such quick succession as to justify the confident belief that the entire Federal army under General Grant would be annihilated before the close of the day. About 4 P. M., as we were halted in line of battle to reform, while a brigade of prisoners just captured were being escorted by our cavalry to the rear, and preparatory to our final attack
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
ramp, tramp, tramp, the boys are marching, and Grant (who had succeeded Meade), crossing the Rappahell, McClellan, Pope, Burnside, Hooker and now Grant,—all being disastrously repulsed by the Army oving their repulse by the army led by Lee. But Grant in some sort, veiled his reverses by immediateaign of Lee from the Wilderness to Petersburg, Grant had lost no less than 70,000 men in reaching a000 men covering a line of thirty miles, while Grant, with more than three times that number, over rock of fate. On April 1st the left wing of Grant's massive lines swept around the right and read them in massive concentric lines the army of Grant, flushed with success and expectation—more thas best uniform, rides to the front to meet General Grant. For several days demands for surrender htled to demand. General, said Lee, addressing Grant, and opening the conversation, I deem it due thich I am determined to maintain to the last. Grant gave fitting and magnanimous response, and the[7 more...]<
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