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The Daily Dispatch: May 11, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Combined movement on Richmond — the enemy on the Southside — fight at Chester — the great cavalry Raid, &c. (search)
uda Hundreds.--These men declare that the fighting at Port Walthall on action Saturday was terrible, and that they suffered very severely. Gen. Heckman's orderly was killed by his side, his horse was shot under him and the fingers of one hand were shot off.--They say that Butler was in command, and Gillmore was on the field. The impression prevails throughout the army that Gen Beauregard was in command. Butler caused a telegram to be read to the troops early Saturday morning, stating that Grant had gained a great victory over Lee; had driven him twenty miles, and at last accounts was self-driving him. This lying announcement was received with a great outburst of applause, of cause, Speare's cavalry Raid. The notorious Speare, who was so successfully driven back at Broadwater Bridge on Friday, by Sturdivant's battery and Col Ratcliffe's regiment, immediately turned his course towards the source of the Blackwater river, and crossed at a point several miles higher up, where t
The Daily Dispatch: May 11, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Combined movement on Richmond — the enemy on the Southside — fight at Chester — the great cavalry Raid, &c. (search)
et from East Tennessee is of itself equal to a heavy reinforcement of Gen Thomas, and it is probable that Gen Sherman — Gen Grant's chief in command in the West--will take good care that no further reinforcements from Georgia are sent forward to Genwith a large force, must remain in Georgia, at all hazards to Gen Lee. In this view Gen Sherman holds the right wing of Gen Grant's forces operating against Richmond. Gens Butler and Baldy smith the left, and Gen Meade the centre with the heroic ol. A telegram from Washington says: A most remarkable reticence is observed with regard to the movements of General Grant. Flying rumors prevail, as a matter of necessity, on the eve of all great events, but nothing is known of the intentich is approaching. We are told that the only fear is that Gen Lee will "attempt to escape" from his position before General Grant moves upon his works. It may he a vague fear, however, which need not distress those who are anxious upon the questi