Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for U. S. Grant or search for U. S. Grant in all documents.

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fleet up Red river. As early as April he had been consulting with Grant, commanding at the farther gates of Vicksburg. Would Grant help hiGrant help him with Port Hudson? Could he, or could he not, give Grant a quid pro quo with Vicksburg? On April 10th Grant sent the following message tGrant a quid pro quo with Vicksburg? On April 10th Grant sent the following message to Banks: Am concentrating my forces at Grand Gulf. Will send an army corps to Bayou Sara by the 25th to cooperate with you. In this Grant wGrant sent the following message to Banks: Am concentrating my forces at Grand Gulf. Will send an army corps to Bayou Sara by the 25th to cooperate with you. In this Grant was not wholly unselfish. Friends were gathering in force around Pemberton—the more need he should meet them with his friends. If he grantedGrant was not wholly unselfish. Friends were gathering in force around Pemberton—the more need he should meet them with his friends. If he granted Banks a favor, he had equally a favor to ask of Banks. Can you aid me, and send me troops after the reduction of Port Hudson to assist me at Vicksburg? Grant did not seem at this time to have conjectured that Vicksburg was to surrender to him before, not after Port Hudson was tonst the combined attack, which had been canvassed so loudly between Grant and Banks that he had not failed to hear some of the whispers. D
r besiegers, Port Hudson had offered a long and brave resistance to hers. On May 27th, General Banks, strong in the presence of Farragut's fleet, and resting upon Grant's promises, threw his infantry forward within a mile of the breastworks. Col. W. R. Miles, Louisiana legion, commanded in the center; Gen. W. N. R. Beall watched urled against the Confederate left. The repulse of the assault upon the left was decisive for that day. Banks, still confiding in his fleet and still leaning upon Grant, continued to invest the works. On June 13th he demanded the unconditional surrender of the Port. He lacked the potently convincing tone of U. S. Grant, and coagazine, September, 1863. The surrender of Port Hudson to General Banks (with the fleet) on July 9th, followed, as has been seen, the surrender of Vicksburg to General Grant on July 4, 1863. History of Confederate States, Jefferson Davis. The surrender of Port Hudson by General Gardner included about 6,000 persons all told, 51 p