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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cursory sketch of the campaigns of General Bragg. (search)
Cursory sketch of the campaigns of General Bragg. By Major E. T. Sykes. The army at Dalton. The Army of Tennessee fell back and went into winter quarters at Dalton, Georgia, forty miles distant from Chattanooga, and where the Georgia State road connects with the East Tennessee railroad. Extract from a letter of General Bragg to the writer, dated February 8th, 1873: In our retreat from Missionary Ridge, the enemy could make but a feeble pursuit, for want of artillery horses (Grant's report). At the mountain gorge near Ringgold, I believed he could be successfully repulsed, and the army quickly withdrawn. General Cleburn, one of the best and truest soldiers in our cause, was placed at that point in command of the rear guard. Late at night, hours after all the army was at rest, my information being all in, I called for a reliable confidential staff officer, and gave him verbal directions to ride immediately to Cleburn, about three (3) miles in my rear, at this mountain g
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Northern opinion of Grant's generalship. (search)
A Northern opinion of Grant's generalship. [The following able criticism of General Grant's clGeneral Grant's claim to great generalship was published in the New York Tribune last summer, and is worth preservingents and conclusions, but that his estimate of Grant will be that of the future historian there canthe Tribune. Sir,—The attitude in which General Grant has so long been posed before the world isnever seen seriously questioned, speaks of General Grant as one who was successful on a moderate teginia campaign was a failure, and elsewhere of Grant's useless sacrifice of ten thousand men at Colputable facts. I understand from him that General Grant was at least seven times conspicuously andl believe that had Jackson lived a year longer Grant would not only have been defeated, but, as a cingle military idea, pretty nearly destroyed. Grant possessed an advantage over all his predecessos at that period. The dry truth of it is that Grant lost more battles in Virginia than he ever won[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the last campaign of the army of Tennessee, from May, 1864, to January, 1865. (search)
and it was not long before we heard of immense reinforcements, pouring through the mountains to the rescue. General U. S Grant was with them and they gave prompt notice to Bragg of their approach by surprising his extreme left, and thereby opening al swelled their numbers to over a hundred thousand men, and, combined with the presence of their one successful leader. Grant, gave new zeal and courage to the old whipped army of Rosecrans. Our commander made but feeble attempts at entrenchmenegan. It was thought, too, that it was a doubtful question: which was the most famished, the besiegers or besieged? General Grant must have had very accurate accounts of our condition; for, unless he did, his movement was a very bold one. Had thostarvation alone pushed him to that venture. It was a struggle for life on both sides, with this difference: that whilst Grant was wielding four times our force, and had an army revived in spirit and enthusiastic in its confidence in him, our littl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last chapter in the history of Reconstruction in South Carolina. (search)
rganize the militia; in doing this he recognized only the black race. They were formed into companies and regiments; to these arms were distributed, which are aptly described by Governor Perry as fruitful of the worst of crimes. The whites were not allowed their share of the public arms. It was a sense of the danger to which the whites were exposed at thus being kept without arms that gave rise to the rifle clubs, which were a grievance to Governor Chamberlain, which were denounced by General Grant, but which it is truth to say, became the only power which at one time saved the State by its moral power alone from the extreme horrors of anarchy. When General Hunt called on some of these clubs to assist in restoring peace to the city after one of the most terrible riots that had ever been known in it, he was instantly reported to the government at Washington, and was almost as instantly sent on duty elsewhere. But they were almost the only force which he could trust. The Governme
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last chapter in the history of Reconstruction in South Carolina— administration of D. H. Chamberlain. (search)
pervaded the whole body of them; they were on their trial, and any false step would prove their ruin, by furnishing President Grant with a plausible pretext for resorting to the strong hand. Election of Whipper and Moses. The Legislature met ocrats. He felt that his position was insecure and that he needed all the aid he could get. He wrote accordingly to President Grant, to define and defend his position in the matter of the judges, avowing his great ambition to give the vote of Southhis word was not to be depended upon. He was too anxious to stand well with Morton, and he too evidently stood in awe of Grant. He was a man of culture—knew what the world held highest, and perhaps in his better moments would have gladly been the ipper and Elliott, negroes whom he despised, but he could not bear the frown of Morton, nor brook the rude displeasure of Grant. All this was known even to those who were willing to stand by him, but what hope was there that the incubus of radicali
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
Rev. J. G. Law. July 17th, 1862.—Spent the day playing chess with Dr. Alexander Erskine. News has been received of the capture of General Curtis and his command by General Hindman in Arkansas; also of the debut of the Confederate ram Arkansas. She passed out of the Yazoo river, running through the Federal fleet, sinking two of their boats and disabling others. Feel very uneasy about my mother and sisters in Memphis, as nothing has been heard from them since the 12th of June, and General Grant has issued an order expelling the families of Confederate soldiers from the city. Sunday, July 20th.—This morning we had a grand review of Cheatham's division. General Polk and Governor Harris were on the field. The troops presented an imposing sight as the several brigades passed in review with banners floating to the breeze and bayonets gleaming brightly in the morning sunbeams. There were five brigades on the field. One of our country Captains forgot Hardee's Tactics at company
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Wolseley's tribute to Lee and Jackson. (search)
our side of the Atlantic. I have only known two heroes in my life, and General R. E. Lee is one of them, so you can well understand how I value one of his letters. I believe that when time has calmed down the angry passions of the North, General Lee will be accepted in the United States as the greatest General you have ever had, and second as a patriot only to Washington himself. Stonewall Jackson, I only knew slightly, his name will live forever also in American history when that of Mr. U. S. Grant has been long forgotten, such at least is my humble opinion of these men when viewed by an outside student of military history who has no local prejudice. I am glad to hear that my much-valued friend, Mrs. L., is well and happy. She was one of the brightest and most lovable women I have ever known; please remember me to her affectionately should you soon write to her. I enclose you a photograph with my great pleasure. I shall indeed be proud that it finds a place in your collecti
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
rge number received, coming from representative men of opposite sides well express the feeling with which this great enterprize is being prosecuted. From General U. S. Grant. New York, May 7, 1884. Peyton Wise, Esq., Chairman, &c.: Dear Sir,—I am in receipt of the formal invitation to be present at the opening of the Fair fford to be the best of friends now, and only strive for rivalry in seeing which can be the best citizens of the grandest country on earth. Very truly yours, U. S. Grant. It should be added to General Grant's honor that the above letter was written amidst his severe pecuniary troubles, and that he had previously contributedGeneral Grant's honor that the above letter was written amidst his severe pecuniary troubles, and that he had previously contributed five hundred dollars ($500) to the fund. From General John B. Gordon. New York, May 10, 1884. Hon. Peyton Wise, Chairman: my Dear Sir,—you will understand how grateful to my sensibilities are the contents of your letter of May 5th, and how gladly I should accept the invitation of the committee and yourself. It seems now, ho
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last chapter in the history of Reconstruction in South Carolina—Administration of D. H. Chamberlain. (search)
olitical market to attend to the proper duties of his office. Towards the end of the month the Governor went to Washington, a practice common with our radical governors and judges when trouble of any kind existed. He also wrote a letter to President Grant, which we shall presently give, but it was not published until called for by the House of Representatives. On the 4th August the Secretary of War ordered that all troops not required to act against the Indians be held in readiness to act they overlook the brutality and seek to find some excuse for it. Their intention is to introduce the Mississippi plan into the State. In this state of general alarm among the negroes, may not the Governor expect help from the President? President Grant, who a year before had turned a deaf ear to the call of the Governor of Mississippi for help, now when the elections are approaching finds that the rights and liberties of the citizens are in peril, sympathizes deeply with the Governor of So
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
ion. He saved the Southern approaches to Richmond and, perhaps, that city itself, by defeating and bottling up Butler at Bermuda Hundred. But his greatest feat in this campaign was his defence of Petersburg on June the 15th, 16th, and 17th. General Grant managed his crossing of the James so well as to deceive General Lee for some days and to keep him in ignorance of his real design. In this way Grant succeeded in throwing a large part of the Federal army against Petersburg, before General LeGrant succeeded in throwing a large part of the Federal army against Petersburg, before General Lee reached there with the advance of his army on June 18. Beauregard meantime held the defences of Petersburg, and made a brilliant and tenacious struggle for them. He managed his small force with such skill and courage as to keep back the half of the Federal army, and though forced from his advanced positions he saved the city, and placed his troops on the lines which the Army of Northern Virginia was to defend with such wonderful pluck for more than nine months thereafter. We have not spa
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