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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
aynesboro, Georgia, who was assistant adjutant-general on the staff of General Sorrell. Colonel Perry was himself the officer who received from the hands of General Grant's messenger the written demand upon General Lee that he should surrender. The letter produced. The letter of Colonel Perry is addressed to Hon. Robert L.arance, as well as possible, of being perfectly satisfied with my personal exterior. The officer spoke first, introducing himself as General Seth Williams, of General Grant's staff. After I had introduced myself he felt in his side pocket for documents, as I thought, but the document was a very nice-looking silver flask, as welourtesies. In fact, if I had offered what I could it would have taken my corn. General Grants letter. He then handed me a letter, which he said was from General Grant to General Lee, and asked that General Lee should get it immediately, if possible. I made no reply, except to ask him if that was all we had to transact, or s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
our flank attack, which I have described here so briefly, was not underestimated by the enemy in his subsequent reports. The official report of the battle by General Grant, or his immediate subordinate, describes the tremendous attack of these three brigades, which turned his own left flank and nearly brought about a wide-spread ays thought that, had it not been that Longstreet was shot then by his own men, we would have put the Federals across the river that night and changed the whole of Grant's flank movement, which terminated in the seige of Petersburg. I don't remember that we saw Sorrel after that day, until the evening we marched into Petersburg e up, and taking a seat by me, said, Colonel Feild, it was very unfortunate for our cause that Longstreet was wounded. Had this not occurred, we would have driven Grant across the river before night in spite of all he could have done. We had two miles of his left thoroughly routed, and this part of the line driven back on the oth
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
ositions to meet the central attack were painfully feeble. Grant, with a small force, was permitted to leisurely advance andc concentration at the threatened point might have stopped Grant and probably held the line of Kentucky many months longer—sps are now distributed Vicksburg is in danger. Later, when Grant was closing his toils around Pemberton, he peremptorially tstood or disobeyed all his orders and wholly misapprehended Grant's warfare. The truth is that Grant outgeneraled them all. Grant outgeneraled them all. Davis' favorite was a mere child in this Union general's hands. Confederate commanders in the West. Davis was unfortunan was resumed by sending Longstreet to Knoxville, affording Grant ample time on exterior lines to swoop down and clean out thta campaign, says that Sherman was relatively stronger than Grant over Lee, that his own effective force was less than fifty ly observes, that like himself, Lee was falling back before Grant in Virginia, yet constantly gaining in military renown, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Medical history of the Confederate States Army and Navy (search)
nature of the Confederate operations around Chattanooga, in the months of September and November, 1863, will be seen by a brief view of the preceding great battles fought by the armies of Mississippi and Tennessee, and of the subsequent campaigns under General Joseph E. Johnston and General J. B. Hood, in 1864 and 1865. At the battle of Belmont, Missouri, on the 7th November, 1861, the Confederate forces, under the command of General Leonidas Polk, defeated the Federal forces under General U. S. Grant, with a loss to the former of killed, one hundred and five; wounded, four hundred and nineteen; missing, one hundred and seventeen; total, six hundred and forty-one. The Confederate operations of 1861 and 1862, as conducted by General Albert Sidney Johnston, at the battle of Shiloh, were characterized by the most appalling disasters. Fort Henry, Tennessee, fell February 6, 1862, with an insignificant loss of five killed, eleven wounded, sixty-three prisoners. Fort Donelson, T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
y of Northern Virginia, and, in my opinion, the most brilliant that ever was fought by any general, with any army, a campaign, in which the movements of General Lee were so daring and wonderful, that a writer has said, they must have reminded General Grant of what a martinet Austrian general once said of Napoleon. On one occasion when asked by a French officer what he thought of the state of the war, he replied: Nothing could be worse on your side. Here you have a youth who knows nothing of the rules of war. To-day he is in our rear, to morrow on our flank, next day in our front. Such gross violations of the principles of the art of war are not to be supported. I refer, of course, to the campaign against Grant, from the Rapidan to Petersburg, in which Swinton says the Army of Northern Virginia killed and wounded more of the enemy than it had men in its ranks. Although this campaign is teeming with the splendid work of the artillery from the beginning to the end I can
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
ave consented to the conditions imposed by General Grant upon General Lee, and who would have disre a military usurper. The generous kindness of Grant came to his relief. New terms were agreed upo at this juncture the generous kindness of General Grant interposed between him and these alleged ent, for he gave the following direction to General Grant a fortnight before the Sherman-Johnston negotiations: Lieutenant-General Grant. The President directs me to say to you that he wishes yde this statement you must have known that General Grant condemned General Sherman's act before conte the original of the following note from General Grant to General Stanton: headquarters armies Very respectfully, your obedient servant, U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. General Grant starGeneral Grant started immediately after the adjournment of the cabinet meeting for Raleigh, North Carolina, and arrivrmy was surrendered upon the terms accorded by Grant to Lee. As a matter of prudence and necessi[5 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
g the night of the 6th the broken fragments of Grant's army were reorganized and united with Buell'Federals. We give below the strength of General Grant's army as compiled by the War Department, various commands made just before the battle: Grant's army, present for duty, 49,314; total presennfederates for the field on Monday. This gave Grant, on Monday, 61,110; Beauregard, on Monday, 30,tles and Leaders, Vol. IV, page 179.) General Grant's tactics were to flank Lee out of all his and beat him in the race to Richmond. When Grant had crossed the river and began his flanking, ng the Rappahannock, 38,426 reinforcements. Grant's army, then, from the day he left the Rappahald Harbor, 76,400, against Grant's 156,426. Grant's losses, beginning at the Wilderness, includied, wounded and captured—6,215. Summarized, Grant's losses for thirty days were as follows: Killbelow the monthly returns of the effectives of Grant's and Lee's armies for each month thereafter u[29 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the monument to the Richmond Howitzers (search)
stitutions of sound morality and true religion. Accept, most merciful God, this statue, we pray Thee, which we have erected as a memorial of Southern valor and as an object-lesson to inspire our youth with love of country and patriotic deeds. Grant that it may long withstand the war of the elements and the crumbling tooth of time. Grant that generations yet unborn in looking upon this embodiment in bronze of the most exhalted manhood and soldiership may emulate and even surpass the charactGrant that generations yet unborn in looking upon this embodiment in bronze of the most exhalted manhood and soldiership may emulate and even surpass the character and conduct of their sires. Bless our aged veterans and all the volunteers. Bless us all. And, finally, when we have fought the fight and won the victory admit us, through the riches of Thy grace, into the eternal home of the soul, there to meet again those who have gone before. And Thine shall be the kingdom and the power and the glory forever. Amen. The cord drawn. Immediately after the prayer Colonel J. C. Shields stepped forward and, removing his hat, took the cord fastened to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
his opponent, who out-generaled him, and the result was the reverse of what Sherman had intended and anticipated. Forrest's force during these operations numbered about three thousand men, one-half of whom were raw and badly-armed recruits. General Grant says: Smith's command was nearly double that of Forrest, but not equal man to man, for lack of a successful experience, such as Forrest's men had had. And yet they were, as soldiers went in this war, well drilled and commanded by a regular Sherman's line of communication, tore up railroads, destroyed bridges and viaducts, captured gunboats, burned transports and many millions of dollars worth of stores and supplies of all sorts. Well justified, indeed, was Sherman when he wrote to Grant in November, 1864: That devil Forrest was down about Johnsonville, making havoc among the gunboats and transports. He took part in General Hood's disastrous Nashville campaign, and covered the retreat of that general's army from Columbia. Thi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.25 (search)
s with her wise smile. Fellow-citizens of North Carolina, fellow-citizens of Mecklenburg, I congratulate you especially that there is something else which the tooth of time has wholly spared. I congratulate you that after all the researches of their contemporaries, their historians and their critics, here, too, you can hold fast and keep forever undisturbed your veneration for the gray forefathers of the State, and all your pride in the authentic precursors of American Independence. Grant for a moment the very uttermost that anybody ever tried to prove to unsettle the verdict of the North Carolina historian. Has it ever occurred to you to inquire what it amounts to? Nothing at all, or nothing but this—that your forefathers were less than a fortnight later in being still by more than a year in advance of all as the forerunners, the precursors of American Independence. Which one of the thirteen States, finding such a record as that among its archives, never questioned, u
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