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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 604 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 570 8 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 498 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 456 2 Browse Search
William A. Crafts, Life of Ulysses S. Grant: His Boyhood, Campaigns, and Services, Military and Civil. 439 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 397 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 368 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 368 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 334 0 Browse Search
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant 330 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Ulysses S. Grant or search for Ulysses S. Grant in all documents.

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1872; M. C., 1873-75; U. S. Dist. Atty., 1877-83; U. S. Minister to Spain, 1879-98. Brevet Brigadier-General James Grant Wilson, author of Addresses on Lincoln, Grant, Hull, Farragut, etc.; President, New York Genealogical and biographical Society and of American Ethnological Society. Brevet Major-General William B. Hazen, chiough Georgia (School of the soldier, Marching and Foraging). Col. W. C. Church; later editor of the Army and Navy Journal and author of life of Ulysses S. Grant (Grant). T. S. C. Lowe, Military Balloonist in the Peninsula campaign, 1802—the First War Aeronaut (Balloons). Capt. T. S. Peck; medal of honor in 1864; later Adj.-imed to render the test throughout the largest part of the Photographic History as detached and impersonal as possible. The value, for instance, of the chapter on Grant, by Colonel W. C. Church, lies not only in the trained military criticism of technical operations by the veteran editor of the Army and Navy Journal, but also in t
and that same afternoon the soldiers of Thomas swarmed over the crest of Missionary Ridge while Grant himself looked on and wondered. When a few days later Grant visited the spot whence the flag waGrant visited the spot whence the flag was waved, an enterprising photographer, already on the spot, preserved the striking scene. Seated with his back against a tree, General J. A. Rawlins gazes at his leader. Behind him stands General Wtle from above. Colonel Lagow is carrying a pair of field glasses. Less than four months later Grant was commissioned lieutenant-general and placed in general command of the Union armies. The man of all men who knew General Grant best, his friend and chief ally, General W. T. Sherman, declared that Grant more nearly than any other man impersonated the American character of 1861-65, and wasGrant more nearly than any other man impersonated the American character of 1861-65, and was the typical hero of our great Civil War. It is an anomaly of history that a man so distinguished in war should be so unwarlike in personal characteristics as was Ulysses Simpson Grant, and so sin
four generals-in-chief of the armies: Brevet Lieutenant-General Scott, Major-Generals McClellan and Halleck, and Lieutenant-General Grant. The last named has been considered in previous pages of this volume, but the lives and services of the other t Department of Mississippi) from November 19, 1861, to July 11, 1862, when he became general-in-chief of all the armies. Grant succeeded him, March 9, 1864, and Halleck was his chief-of-staff until the close of the war. He continued in the army as er, Major-General Burnside was assigned to command of the Department of the Ohio. Burnside and the Ninth Corps were with Grant in the A third General-in-chief McClellan with his wife Major-General George Brinton McClellan began his war career Peninsula and Antietam campaigns. Meade, its last commander, said: Had there been no McClellan there could have been no Grant. Virginia campaign of 1864. Major-General Burnside resigned his commission at the close of the war and resumed his caree
Confederate generals no. 20—Tennessee William H. Carroll led a brigade in East Tennessee. John C. Carter, originally Colonel of the 38th regiment. John C. Vaughen, commander of a Cavairy brigade. Gideon J. Pillow, opponent of Grant in Grant's First Battle—Belmont. George W. Gordon, led a brigade in Army of Tennessee. Alfred J. Vaughn led a brigade in General Polk's Corps. Henry B. Davidson, led a brigade of Wheeler's Cavalry. Tyree H. Bell led a Cavalry command unGrant's First Battle—Belmont. George W. Gordon, led a brigade in Army of Tennessee. Alfred J. Vaughn led a brigade in General Polk's Corps. Henry B. Davidson, led a brigade of Wheeler's Cavalry. Tyree H. Bell led a Cavalry command under Forrest. William McComb led a brigade in R. E. Lee's Army. Joseph B. Palmer led a brigade in General Polk's Corps. future manhood and noble womanhood. Whether the Southern people, under their changed conditions, may ever hope to witness another civilization which shall equal that which began with their Washington and ended with their Lee, it is certainly true that devotion to their glorious past is not only the surest guarantee of future progress and the holiest bond of unity, but i<
Chapter 9: roster of general officers both Union and Confederate The General-in-chief of the armies of the United States a picture of Grant with his favorite charger Cincinnati taken at Cold Harbor on June 4, 1864, in the midst of the hammering policy that in ten months terminated the war General officers of the Union Army This roster includes in alphabetical order under the various grades the names of all general officers either of full rank or by brevet in the United States (Regular) Army and in the United States Volunteers during the Civil War. The highest rank attained, whether full or by brevet, only is given, in order to avoid duplications. It is, of course, understood that in most cases the actual rank next below that conferred by brevet was held either in the United States Army or the Volunteers. In some cases for distinguished gallantry or marked efficiency brevet rank higher than the next grade above was given. The date is that of the appointment. L