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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
rbocker History, 237 Knickerbocker magazine, the, 241, 312 n., 322 n. Knight, Sarah, 10, 13 Knight of the golden Fleece, the, 228 Knights of the Hlorse-Shoe, the, 312 Koningsmarke, 311 Kotzebue, 219, 231 Kropf, Lewis L., 18 n. L Ladd, Joseph Brown, 178 Lady Jane, 280 Lafayette, 9, 231, 259, 297 Lafayette or the Castle of Olmutz, 231 Lahontan, 193 Lamb, Charles, 86, 212, 241 Landholder, Letters of A, 148 La Nouvelle Heloise, I 19 Lansdowne, George Granville (1667-1735), 159 La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt, 91, 190 Last Leaf, the, 320 Last of the Mohicans, the, 208, 297-298, 299 Late regulations respecting the British colonies, etc., The, 130 Laud, 36, 42, 46 Launcelot Langstaff, 233 Lavoisier, 91 Lawson, John, 26 Lay Preacher, the, 234, 235, 235 n., 236 Leacock, John, 217 Lectures and biographies, 350 Lee, Dr., Arthur, 120 Lee, Charles, 138, 259 Lee, Richard Henry, 135, 148 Legare, Hugh Swinton, 237
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
hewell, &c. A few days ago I received a most friendly and affectionate letter from Lord Morpeth, in which he enclosed a letter of introduction to the Countess of Granville, Lady Granville (Henrietta Elizabeth) was the wife of Lord Granville, then English Ambassador at Paris. She and her sister, Georgiana, who was Lord Morpeth'sLady Granville (Henrietta Elizabeth) was the wife of Lord Granville, then English Ambassador at Paris. She and her sister, Georgiana, who was Lord Morpeth's mother, were the daughters of the fifth earl of Devonshire. Lord Granville died in 1846, and Lady Granville in 1862. His son is a distinguished statesman. now in Paris. Sir Robert Inglis expressed himself to-night in terms of the highest admiration of Dr. Channing's Texas, which is a good deal from such a churchman. I passeLady Granville in 1862. His son is a distinguished statesman. now in Paris. Sir Robert Inglis expressed himself to-night in terms of the highest admiration of Dr. Channing's Texas, which is a good deal from such a churchman. I passed a very pleasant evening last week—till long past midnight—with Mr. and Mrs. Basil Montagu. Basil Montagu, 1770-1851. He was educated at Cambridge, and called to the bar in 1798. He made the Law of Bankruptcy, both in practice and as a writer, his specialty in the profession. He co-operated with Romilly in the movement to a
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, December 5. (search)
hewell, &c. A few days ago I received a most friendly and affectionate letter from Lord Morpeth, in which he enclosed a letter of introduction to the Countess of Granville, Lady Granville (Henrietta Elizabeth) was the wife of Lord Granville, then English Ambassador at Paris. She and her sister, Georgiana, who was Lord Morpeth'sLady Granville (Henrietta Elizabeth) was the wife of Lord Granville, then English Ambassador at Paris. She and her sister, Georgiana, who was Lord Morpeth's mother, were the daughters of the fifth earl of Devonshire. Lord Granville died in 1846, and Lady Granville in 1862. His son is a distinguished statesman. now in Paris. Sir Robert Inglis expressed himself to-night in terms of the highest admiration of Dr. Channing's Texas, which is a good deal from such a churchman. I passeLady Granville in 1862. His son is a distinguished statesman. now in Paris. Sir Robert Inglis expressed himself to-night in terms of the highest admiration of Dr. Channing's Texas, which is a good deal from such a churchman. I passed a very pleasant evening last week—till long past midnight—with Mr. and Mrs. Basil Montagu. Basil Montagu, 1770-1851. He was educated at Cambridge, and called to the bar in 1798. He made the Law of Bankruptcy, both in practice and as a writer, his specialty in the profession. He co-operated with Romilly in the movement to a
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 19: Paris again.—March to April, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
d me that Lord Jeffrey was of the same opinion with himself. Let us keep war afar: I tremble at the thought of it. I send herewith the Galignani, and venture to ask you to run your eye over it. You know my love for England; and I believe you will do me the justice to think that I would never write about her, except in the spirit of love. This letter will find you in the midst of your own ministerial contest. You will have the ardent opposition of Leader, but the support of Hume. Lady Granville has received me most kindly. I owe you many thanks for introducing me to her. I leave Paris soon for Rome, where I shall be in the middle of May. My address will be with Torlonia & Co.; and I should be much gratified by an assurance from you that we shall have peace between our two countries. As ever, very sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To George S. Hillard, Boston. Paris, April 15, 1839. dear Hillard,—Wherever I am, I find something to do more than I anticipated. I a
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 22: England again, and the voyage home.—March 17 to May 3, 1840. —Age 29. (search)
d Correspondence of the Countess of Blessington, by R. R. Madden, Chap. XI. Sumner referring in a letter of July 4, 1848, to the impression made on him by Louis Napoleon as they met at Lady Blessington's, wrote: He seemed to me an ordinary character. is always there, and of course D'Orsay. The Duchess of Sutherland The Duchess of Sutherland, daughter of the sixth Earl of Carlisle, and sister of Sumner's friend. Lord Morpeth, who became the seventh Earl of Carlisle, was married to George Granville, the second Duke of Sutherland, and died in 1868. She became Mistress of the Robes to the Queen. More than any one in the English nobility she gave the influence of her character and position against American slavery. Sumner received many courtesies from the Duchess on his visit to England in 1857, and was invited by her to be her guest at Stafford House. Her daughter, the Duchess of Argyll, was to the end of Sumner's life one of his most faithful friends and correspondents. Sumner