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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Mary Graves or search for Mary Graves in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 17: the woman's cause 1868-1910 (search)
, a human soul. Evening. The ministry of reconciliation, how Christianity reconciles man to God, nature to spirit, men to each other. I went through the two services entirely alone. I felt supported and held up. I had hoped and prayed this journey might bring some special good to some one. It brought great comfort to me.... On February 16, 1873, after hearing a powerful sermon, she feels awakened to take up the work over which she has dreamed so much, and talks with her friend, Mary Graves, herself an ordained minister of the Unitarian Church, about our proposed Woman's Mission here in Boston. A few days later she writes: Determine that my Sunday services must be held and to see Redpath Of the Redpath Bureau. in this connection. The result of this determination was the organization of the Woman's Liberal Christian Union, which held Sunday afternoon meetings through the spring. She preached the first sermon, on March 16. I meant, she says, to read my London sermon,
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: more changes--1886-1888; aet. 67-69 (search)
such thing. If this is not the right thing, she said, call another priestess; then, very emphatically: Truth, truth. These were her last words. My darling should have been forty-two years old this day.... A few days later she writes to Mary Graves:-- I am not wild, nor melancholy, nor inconsolable, but I feel as America might if some great, fair State were blotted from its map, leaving only a void for the salt and bitter sea to overwhelm. I cannot, so far, get any comfort from otherliction. I pray God to give me comfort by raising me up that I may be ZZZ Michael. nearer to the higher life into which she and her deai father have passed. And thou? eleison.... Have had an uplifting of soul to-day. Have written to Mary Graves: I am at last getting to stand where I can have some spiritual outlook. The confusion of is not is giving place to the steadfastness of is. Have embodied my thoughts in a poem to my dear Julia and in some pages which I may read at the meetin
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
to meet, or rather find, the women ministers. Miss Chapin excused herself from attending and asked me to run the meeting.... I read my short screed, briefly narrating my own efforts to found an association of women ministers. Miss Putnam and Mary Graves were appointed as a committee to consult with me as to a plan of organization. September 26. Up early.... Visited the German village, castle and museum, the mining, agricultural, shoe and leather buildings for a brief space. Made a turn in the Ferris Wheel ... Mary Graves came for me, and we started for the Parliament in good time. The first speaker was intolerably narrow and out of place, insisting upon the hostility of Christ to all ethnic religions. I could not refrain from taking him up a little, very mildly. I was received with applause and the Chautauqua salute, and my brief speech (fourteen minutes without notes) was much applauded. I was very thankful for this opportunity. This impromptu speech made a deep impres
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
also about Greeks and Hebrews, the animosity of race which kept them apart until the flourishing of the Alexandrian school, when the Jews greedily absorbed the philosophy of the Greeks. This was Mr. S. H. Butcher, the well-known Greek scholar. She enjoyed his visit greatly, and they talked high and disposedly of things classical and modern. May 28. My meeting of Women Ministers. They gathered very slowly and I feared that it would prove a failure, but soon we had a good number. Mary Graves helped me very much.... Afterwards I felt a malignant fatigue and depression, not caring to do anything. In June she received the first of her collegiate honors, the degree of Doctor of Laws, conferred by Tufts College. This gratified her deeply, and she describes the occasion at length, noting that she was favored with the Tufts yell twice. Lawrence Evans came, and Harry Hall. .. I read the part of my speech about which I had hesitated, about our trying to put an end to the Turkis