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Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 21 1 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 16 2 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 14 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 7 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 3 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gray, Asa 1810-1888 (search)
Gray, Asa 1810-1888 Botanist; born in Paris, N. Y., Nov. 18, 1810; studied botany under Dr. John Torrey, Professor of Natural History at Harvard College in 1842-73; became widely known by his textbooks on botany, which are in general use throughout the United States. He was the author of Elements of Botany; Structural and systematic Botany; Manual of the Botany of the Northern United States; Gray's botanical text-book, and many others. He died in Cambridge, Mass., Jan. 30, 1888. Gray, Asa 1810-1888 Botanist; born in Paris, N. Y., Nov. 18, 1810; studied botany under Dr. John Torrey, Professor of Natural History at Harvard College in 1842-73; became widely known by his textbooks on botany, which are in general use throughout the United States. He was the author of Elements of Botany; Structural and systematic Botany; Manual of the Botany of the Northern United States; Gray's botanical text-book, and many others. He died in Cambridge, Mass., Jan. 30, 1888.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hall of fame, (search)
ctober, 1900, a jury of 100 persons was appointed to invite and pass upon nominations for the first fifty names. The number of names submitted reached 252, of which twenty-nine received fifty-one (the minimum) or more votes. These were, therefore, declared eligible The following are the names, with the number of votes, which were accepted. The remaining twenty-one are to be selected in 1902: George Washington, 97; Abraham Lincoln, 96; Daniel Webster, 96; Benjamin Franklin, 94; Ulysses S. Grant, 92; John Marshall, 91; Thomas Jefferson, 90; Ralph Waldo Emerson, 87; Henry W. Longfellow, 85; Robert Fulton, 85; Washington Irving, 83; Jonathan Edwards, 81; Samuel F. B. Morse, 80; David G. Farragut, 79; Henry Clay, 74; Nathaniel Hawthorne, 73; George Peabody, 72; Robert E. Lee, 69; Peter Cooper, 69; Eli Whit ney, 67; John J. Audubon, 67; Horace Mann, 66; Henry Ward Beecher, 66; James Kent, 65; Joseph Story, 64; John Adams, 61; William E. Channing, 58; Gilbert Stuart, 52; Asa Gray, 51.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hancock, John 1737- (search)
ived, as well as you who executed the inhuman deed! Do you not feel the goads and stings of conscious guilt pierce through your savage bosom? Though some of you may think yourselves exalted to a height that bids defiance to human justice, and others shroud yourselves beneath the mask of hypocrisy, and build your hopes of safety on the low arts of cunning, chicanery and falsehood; yet do you not sometimes feel the gnawing of that worm which never dies? Do not the injured shades of Maverick, Gray, Caldwell, Attucks and Carr attend you in your solitary walks, arrest you even in the midst of your debaucheries, and fill even your dreams with terror? But if the unappeased manes of the dead should not disturb their murderers, yet surely even your obdurate hearts must shrink, and your guilty blood must chill within your rigid veins, when you behold the miserable Monk, the wretched victim of your savage cruelty. Observe his tottering knees, which scarce sustain his wasted body; look in his
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
, of New York, arrested for incendiary language......Nov. 17, 1887 Fiftieth Congress, first session, opens......Dec. 5, 1887 President Cleveland's third annual message......Dec. 6, 1887 Anarchist Most sentenced to one year's imprisonment......Dec. 8, 1887 Ferdinand Vandeveer Hayden, geologist, born 1829, dies at Philadelphia......Dec. 22, 1887 Ex-Secretary of the Treasury Manning, born 1831, dies at Albany, N. Y.......Dec. 24, 1887 Secretary Lamar resigns......Jan. 7, 1888 Asa Gray, botanist, born 1810, dies at Cambridge, Mass.......Jan. 30, 1888 David R. Locke, Petroleum V. Nasby, Confederate X Roads, born 1833, dies at Toledo, O.......Feb. 15, 1888 W. W. Corcoran, philanthropist, born 1798, dies at Washington, D. C.......Feb. 24, 1888 A. Bronson Alcott, born 1799, dies at Boston, Mass., March 4, and Louise M. Alcott, his daughter, novelist, born 1832, dies at Boston......March 6, 1888 Blizzard on the Atlantic coast; thirty lives lost; $10,000,000 worth
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
..March 6, 1885 Elizur Wright, abolitionist, born 1804, dies at Medford......Nov. 22, 1885 Charles Francis Adams, Sr., born 1807, dies at Boston......Nov. 21, 1886 State property in the Hoosac tunnel and Troy and Greenfield Railroad sold to Fitchburg Railroad Company......1887 First Monday in September (Labor Day) made a legal holiday at session of legislature, which adjourns......June 16, 1887 Spencer F. Baird, naturalist, born 1823; dies at Wood's Holl......Aug. 19, 1887 Asa Gray, botanist, born 1810, dies at Cambridge......Jan. 30, 1888 Ballot law modelled on the Australian system adopted by legislature at session ending......May 29, 1888 Gen. P. H. Sheridan, born 1831, dies at Nonquit......Aug. 5, 1888 Maria Mitchell, astronomer, born 1818, dies at Lynn......June 28, 1889 Maritime exhibition opens at Boston......Nov. 4, 1889 Great fire at Lynn; 296 buildings destroyed; 80 acres burned over; loss, $5,000,000......Nov. 26, 1889 Haverhill celebrates
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Longfellow (search)
reason was chiefly a political one. At a distance Longfellow's politics attracted little attention, but in Cambridge they could not help being felt. In 1862 a strong movement emanated from the Harvard Law-School to defeat Sumner and Andrew, and the lines became drawn pretty sharply. As it happened, the prominent conservatives with one or two exceptions all lived to the east and north of the college grounds, while Longfellow, Lowell, Doctor Francis (who baptized Longfellow's children), Prof. Asa Gray, and other liberals lived at the west end; and the local division made the contest more acrimonious. The conservatives afterwards felt the bitterness of defeat, and it was many years before they recovered from this. A resident graduate of Harvard, who was accustomed to converse on such subjects as the metaphysics of Hamilton's quaternions, once said that Longfellow was the paragon of schoolgirls, because he wrote what they would like to so much better than they could. This was contemp
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Lowell (search)
ever a poet with a sound mind and a sound body, it was James Russell Lowell. Edwin Arnold considered him the best of American poets, while Matthew Arnold did not like him at all. Emerson, in his last years, preferred him to Longfellow, but it is doubtful if he always did so. The strong point of his poetry is its intelligent manliness,--the absence of affectation and all sentimentality; but it lacks the musical element. He composed neither songs nor ballads,--nothing to match Hiawatha, or Gray's famous Elegy. America still awaits a poet who shall combine the savoir faire of Lowell with the force of Emerson and the grace and purity of Longfellow. Emerson had an advantage over his literary contemporaries in the vigorous life he lived. You feel in his writing the energy of necessity. The academic shade is not favorable to the cultivation of genius, and Lowell reclined under it too much. His best work was already performed before he became a professor. What he lacks as a poet,
logical education doubtless contributed greatly to this awakening. In 1842, Dr. Asa Gray, the great botanist, came to Cambridge, and his coming marks an epoch in the scientific life of our city. In 1847, Louis Agassiz, Asa Gray, Jeffries Wyman, and Professor Horsford formed the nucleus of a school of science, which has had more still walks between Quincy Street and Divinity Avenue. My neighbor, too, Dr. Asa Gray, the founder of the herbarium and botanical department of the university, whch has doubtless been a resident of Cambridge since the time of Cotton Mather, Dr. Gray rushed from his library and saved it, and then returned to his important laborn his trees. Then, too, there was a distinguished contemporary of Agassiz and Gray, a man so modest that Cambridge did not know it possessed a great man until he d50, the Scientific School was established, and under the instruction of Agassiz, Gray, Wyman, Peirce, Eustis, Horsford, a number of teachers were bred who, I have sai
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman), Harvard University in its relations to the city of Cambridge. (search)
of thousands of Americans with scientific achievements of lasting worth. Here lived Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse, the first Hersey professor of physic, who introduced the kine-pox into America, and John Winthrop, Hollis professor of natural philosophy from 1738 to 1779, one of the very earliest students of the phenomena of earthquakes, the friend and correspondent of Benjamin Franklin, and the man whose lectures Benjamin Thompson (Count Rumford) walked from Woburn to hear. For two generations Asa Gray has turned the thoughts of innumerable students of botany, young and old, to Cambridge as the place where their guide into botanical science lived and wrote. For two hundred and sixty years the lamp of philosophy has been kept burning in this quiet town, and that illumination makes it a brighter place to live in for the present and the coming generations. Amid the universal struggles to get a livelihood, to make money, and to keep money, here is a place where hundreds of men live quite ap
lsom, Esq., Hon. Joseph Story, Stephen Higginson, Esq., Dr. F. J. Higginson, Rev. Thomas W. Coit, Jonas Wyeth, Jr., John G. Palfrey, William Newell, Nehemiah Adams, R. H. Dana, Ebenezer Francis, Jr., Andrews Norton, Alexander H. Ramsay, Richard M. Hodges, William Saunders, J. B. Dana, C. C. Little, Simon Greenleaf, J. E. Worcester, John A. Albro, C. C. Felton, Charles Beck, Morrill Wyman, James Walker, E. S. Dixwell, Converse Francis, William T. Richardson, H. W. Longfellow, Edward Everett, Asa Gray, Francis Bowen, Joseph Lovering, John Ware, John Holmes, Estes Howe, William Greenough, Robert Carter, E. N. Horsford, Charles E. Norton. Dr. Holmes remained president until his death in 1837, when Joseph Story was put in his place, Dr. Ware still remaining vice-president. Levi Hedge (Ll. D.) was treasurer until 1831, when, on account of ill-health and expected absence from town, he asked to be relieved from the cares of office, and a special meeting was called to choose his successor
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