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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 6 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 4 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 2, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 2 0 Browse Search
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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
er. The town-treasurer during the same period was Moses Withington. 1861. A citizens' meeting, to consider matters in relation to the war, was held on the evening of April 20th at the town hall. It was called to order by Hon. Amos A. Lawrence, and a prayer was offered by Rev. John L. Stone, D. D. The meeting was then permanently organized by the choice of the following gentlemen for officers: President, John Howe; vice-presidents, Augustus Aspinwall, James S. Amory, George B. Blake, Thomas Gray; secretaries, Thomas B. Hall, William V. Churchill. Mr. Howe made a patriotic speech on taking the chair. He had been a soldier in the war of 1812, and had received a Government land-warrant for his service, which he said he should give to the family living in Brookline who should be the first to lose a father or a husband in this war. A number of gentlemen addressed the meeting, among whom were William Aspinwall, Amos A. Lawrence, Captain Selfridge, U. S. N., and Moses B. Williams. On
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 7: a very moral and nice book (search)
ady of great social position who had never heard of Matthew Arnold until the time when his death was announced. When the present writer inquired of the late Mr. Froude, twenty years ago, about his neighbor in London, the late Kenelm H. Digby, author of that delightful book The Broad Stone of Honor, the historian proved never to have heard of either the man or the book. A friend of mine, visiting Stoke Pogis last year, had pointed out to her by the verger the grave of the American poet, Thomas Gray. A young English girl of eighteen, just arrived in this country, and looking at the name of Thackeray on my book-shelf, remarked, He is one of your American novelists, is he not? And a well-known Canadian statesman told me that a London maiden had just made to him a similar remark about Tennyson. Yet the least probable of these anecdotes, or the joint improbability of all put together, is brought within the domain of reasonable credibility by the announcement that Mr. Lang is just read
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
John Trumbull an Elegy on the times (1775), which uses the elegiac quatrains of Gray for satiric invective; but far more important is the same author's McFingal, theccasional odes; a Night piece in elegiac quatrains, which shows the influence of Gray and Young; songs in the manner of Shenstone and Prior; and here and there a touc of unimportant occasional poems, and others imitative of Milton, Cowley, Prior, Gray, and Collins. Evans's most ambitious effort is his Ode on the prospect of peace solitude and melancholy, pastorals and elegies, and other echoes of Shenstone, Gray, and even Mason. It is noticeable that the songs and light social lyrics of theics. His early poems show the influence of Milton, as in The power of fancy; of Gray, as in The monument of Phaon and The Deserted Farm House; and of Goldsmith, as ipression to American nature. Their simplicity and restraint suggest Collins and Gray, but they are not imitative, and it is probable that Freneau is more original in
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
, especially as counteracting the flamboyant and vulgar, the layman may only conjecture. There is no space to speak of his letters beyond noting that, with all their elegance, courtesy, criticism, information, they do not belong, with Cicero's, Gray's, Cowper's, Byron's, Emerson's, Meredith's, to the literature of correspondence, because they are without zest for little details of human life (whether in others or in himself), or without informal spontaneity and flashes of insight-or without w787-1879), one of the founders of The North American review See Book II, Chap. XX. and of the serious tradition in our literary criticism, is remembered, if at all, as verse-writer mainly through Bryant's praise, as Mason is remembered through Gray's. How remote the short jerky stanzas of The Buccaneer (1827), an ambitious tale of pirate and spectre, were from the talents and temper of the Bostonian descendant of the Puritan Anne Bradstreet, one may realize who reflects what Coleridge would
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
e, 260 n., 262 n., 266 n., 269 n., 272 n., 276, 277, 277 n., 282 n. Godwin, William, 288, 290, 291, 292, 307, 331 Goethe, 188, 212, 268, 332 Golden Fleece, the, 3 Golden Hind, 1 Goldsmith, 162, 163, 174, 177, 181, 233, 234, 235, 238, 254, 279, 305 Good news from New England, 19 Goodrich, S. G., 240 Gookin, Daniel, 25, 27 Gordon, Thomas, 118 n. Gospel, the, 133 Gospel order revived, the, 55 Graham, Rev., David, 234 Grant, Anne McV., 311 Grave, 263, 271 Gray, Thomas, 171, 176, 177, 181, 183, 276, 278 Greeley, Horace, 276 Green, Rev., Joseph, 153, 160 Green Mountain boy, the, 228 Green Mountain boys, the, 310 Greene, General, 315 Greenfield Hill, 163, 164, 165 Grenville, George, 126 Greyslaer, 225 n., 310 Gridley, Jeremy, 114, 121 Gronov, J. F. (Gronovius), 195 Grotius, 193 Group, the, 175, 217, 218 Growth of Thanatopsis, the, 262 n. Grund, F. G., 190 Guardian, 116 Gulliver's travels, 118 Guy Mannering, 292
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XV: journeys (search)
my mind however than when, at the close of an early service in the Church of England at Bettws-y-coed in Wales I heard a language at once rattling and melodious and found that a service was proceeding in Welsh. I remembered the school-poem by Thomas Gray called The bard which begins Ruin seize thee, ruthless king Confusion on thy banners wait, and felt that confusion had prevailed in the Welsh language ever since. It suggested inquiring whether the word Welsher as applied, I am told, on in again —so that it is not quite clear whether the good woman is not still standing with that useful member protruded. This was a confusion of tongues indeed; and since the tongue is clearly the banner of health it may be the very disaster which Gray's bard predicted. Such are the anxieties of the wanderer; and when I think how many opportunities I have missed of attending a prescribed worship in Dublin, N. H., I feel that I may have erred in wandering too far and must next year confine my
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 12: Whittier the poet (search)
:-- It is possible that the language and thought of some portions of the book may be considered beyond the comprehension of the class for which it is intended. Admitting that there may be truth in the objection, I believe, with Coventry Patmore in his preface to a child's book, that the charm of such a volume is increased rather than lessened by the surmised existence of an unknown element of power, meaning, and beauty. I well remember how, at a very early age, the solemn organ-roll of Gray's Elegy and the lyric sweep and pathos of Cowper's Lament for the Royal George moved and fascinated me with a sense of mystery and power felt rather than understood. A spirit passed before my face, but the form thereof was not discerned. Freighted with unguessed meanings, these poems spake to me, in an unknown tongue, indeed, but like the wind in the pines or the waves on the beach, awakening faint echoes and responses, and vaguely prophesying of wonders yet to be revealed. He was the
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Index. (search)
0; relation between Whittier and, 26, 66, 67, 69, 71, 72; his letters, 26, 27; seeks Whittier's aid in antislavery movement, 48; Whittier's verses to, 54, 55; on Concord mob, 61; Garrison mob, 62; his party, 68; his tribute to Whittier, 72; Whittier's tribute to, 72-75; differs from Whittier, 75; compared with Whittier, 95, 96. Geneva, Switzerland, 166. Georgetown, Mass., 89, 90. Gerry, Gov., Elbridge, 31. Gordon, Gen. C. G., 78, 112, 113. Gorton, Samuel, 84. Gove, Sarah A., 183. Gray, Thomas, his Elegy, mentioned, 159. Greenacre, Me., 180. Greene, Mrs., Nathaniel, 19. Greenleaf, Sarah, 5. Greenwood, Grace. See Lippincott. Grimke, Angelina, 115. Griswold, Rufus W., Letters of, quoted, 108, 109. H. Hampton Falls, N. H., 183. Hampton, N. H., 85. Hampton, Va., school at, 98. Hanmer and Phelps, 35. Harmon, Capt., 36. Harper's Ferry, Va., 79. Hartford, Conn., 34, 35, 37, 137, 138. Harvard University, 3; law school, 88; confers honorary degree on Whittier,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, English men of letters. (search)
y William Black. Cowper. By Goldwin Smith. Byron. By John Nichol. Shelley. By John Addington Symonds. Keats. By Sidney Colvin, M. A. Wordsworth. By F. W. H. Myers. Southey. By Edward Dowden. Landor. By Sidney Colvin, M. A. Lamb. By Alfred Ainger. Addison. By W. J. Courthope. Swift. By Leslie Stephen. Scott. By Richard H. Hutton. Burns. By Principal Shairp. Coleridge. By H. D. Traill. Hume. By T. H. Huxley, F. R.S. Locke. By Thomas Fowler. Burke. By John Morley. Fielding. By Austin Dobson. Thackeray. By Anthony Trollope. Dickens. By Adolphus William Ward. Gibbon. By J. Cotter Morison. Carlylze. By John Nichol. Macaulay. By J. Cotter Morison. Sidney. By J. A. Symonds. De Quincey. By David Masson. Sheridan. By Mrs. Oliphant. Pope. By Leslie Stephen. Johnson. By Leslie Stephen. Gray. By Edmund Gosse. Bacon. By R. W. Church. Bunyan. By J. A. Froude. Bentley. By R. C. Jebb. Published by the Macmillan Company 66 Fifth Avenue, New York
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
June 27. To lunch with Mrs. Harland. Very pleasant. Edmund Gosse was the guest invited to meet me. He was vivacious, easy, and agreeable. Also the composer Marzials.... June 28. To Westminster Abbey. To Alice, its interest seemed inexhaustible. It is so, indeed, had one time to be strewing violets all the time, as E. B. B. said. Longfellow's bust has been placed there since my last visit; the likeness is good. I wandered about as long as my feet would carry me, thinking sometimes of Gray's question, Can storied urn, etc. The Harlands came later and brought the composer of Twickenham Ferry. With Alice to dine at Toynbee Hall. A pleasant dinner. A bright young man, Bruce by name, related to Abyssinian Bruce, took Alice in to dinner — sitting afterwards in Ames's room, where we met an alderman, a bricklayer, a trades' unionist; later, we heard a lecture from Commander Gladstone, on the Norman-Breton churches, with fine stereoscopic plates. A violent storm came on, but we man
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