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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 18 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 10 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Gray or search for Gray in all documents.

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man's movements. the attack and bombardment. defense. surrender. loss. Phelps up the Tennessee. When Tennessee seceded, her authorities assembled volunteers at the most assailable points on her borders, and took measures for guarding the water-entrances to her territory. All the strong points on the Mississippi were occupied and fortified-Memphis, Randolph, Fort Pillow, and Island No.10. The last-named place, though a low-lying island, was believed to be a very strong position. Captain Gray, the engineer in charge when General Johnston assumed command (September 18th), reported that Island No.10 was one of the finest strategic positions in the Mississippi Valley, and, properly fortified, would offer the greatest resistance to the enemy; and that its intrenchments could not be taken by a force four or five times superior in number. It is not necessary here to enter upon a narrative of the defenses of the Mississippi River. Columbus was relied upon as the chief barrier again
otecting care, and invoking his guidance in future. The following reminiscences of General A. S. Johnston were furnished by Rev. R. M. Chapman: I spent the first half of the year 1839 at Houston, Texas, where I boarded at the house of Colonel Gray, in company with President Lamar, General A. S. Johnston, Secretary of War in Lamar's cabinet, and several other distinguished gentlemen. The opportunity thus afforded me of seeing much of General Johnston was enhanced by his kindness in convck; and, if I have only a blanket, you shall have half of it. It was in the spring of that year that Bishop Polk, then missionary Bishop of the Southwest, made his first visitation in Texas. During his stay in Houston he was entertained at Colonel Gray's. His meeting there with General Johnston was particularly gratifying to them both, as they had been contemporaries at West Point, and for a part of the time room-mates. Of course, at such an interview (and I believe it was the first they