hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 18 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 10 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Gray or search for Gray in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
the world's judgment, the great war of secession and independence. In that contest the Southern mind and the Southern tongue and pen will not be less brilliant but more successful than than the Southern heart and the Southern sword. Let us do what we can to help this great purpose and end. Fellow citizens and guests, I offer you the name and fame of Fitzhugh Lee, the worthy comrade in the saddle of Stuart and of Hampton, and the good deeds of J. William Jones, the Chaplain of The Boys in Gray, whose life-work will perpetuate on the enduring page the memory of our heroes living and dead. Our printers report our space all filled, and we must reluctantly leave out what we had to say of Augusta, Athens, Rome, and Greenville, S. C., at all of which places we met a cordial greeting, and were placed under high obligations for courtesies freely extended. But we must say, that Colonel C. C. Jones, Jr., and the committee in Augusta—Dr. Newton, Captain Charlton, and others, in Athens—
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
the world's judgment, the great war of secession and independence. In that contest the Southern mind and the Southern tongue and pen will not be less brilliant but more successful than than the Southern heart and the Southern sword. Let us do what we can to help this great purpose and end. Fellow citizens and guests, I offer you the name and fame of Fitzhugh Lee, the worthy comrade in the saddle of Stuart and of Hampton, and the good deeds of J. William Jones, the Chaplain of The Boys in Gray, whose life-work will perpetuate on the enduring page the memory of our heroes living and dead. Our printers report our space all filled, and we must reluctantly leave out what we had to say of Augusta, Athens, Rome, and Greenville, S. C., at all of which places we met a cordial greeting, and were placed under high obligations for courtesies freely extended. But we must say, that Colonel C. C. Jones, Jr., and the committee in Augusta—Dr. Newton, Captain Charlton, and others, in Athens—
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
and excited great enthusiasm. Miss Johnie H. Morgan (the only daughter of the gallant chief) and Miss Tommie Duke (daughter of General Basil Duke), were presented by Governor Blackburn and were received with great enthusiasm, as was also Mrs. Morris, who had been an angel of mercy to our prisoners in Camp Douglas. At night the committee were courteous enough to place on the programme and the crowd were kind enough to hear a high private in the rear rank, from Virginia, tell of The Boys in Gray, with whom he was associated, and to show by their hearty responses that the men who rode with Morgan were in warm sympathy with Jackson's Foot Cavalry. Among the letters of regret at not being able to be present on the occasion was one from President Davis, in which he said: You have justly appreciated the many endearing memories of my youth which cluster around the place of your meeting, and it would be most gratifying to me to exchange salutations with the survivors of the gallant