Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Gray or search for Gray in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
worthy a place among the papers it is at your service. Or if it will better grace the waste basket, I am agreeable. Very truly yours, —— —— —— We need scarcely add that the article sent will find an early place in our papers. The following has the true ring: St. Louis, December 29th, 1883. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary: Dear Sir,—Your card of 17th inst. just received. I at once enclose and send you $3.00 currency, renewal subscription for papers and membership. I wore the Gray from May, 1861, to April, 1865, so am very naturally anxious to see the Southern Historical Society a success. Yours truly, —— —— —— The following from a distinguished soldier who wore the Blue will be appreciated, as his sentiments are cordially reciprocated: Boston, January 16th, 1884. My Dear Secretary,—Enclosed please find $3.00 in payment subscription for 1884, Southern Historical papers. Let me congratulate you and the Society on the success of your
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
ndid success: R. E. Lee camp, No. 1, Confederate veterans, Richmond, Va., January 15th, 1884. The above Camp of old Confeds see and feel the necessity for concentrated effort to aid and care for the disabled of our comrades, who have no Government to bestow bounty upon them, and who must rely on those who experienced the hardship of soldier life, and those who have sympathy for them. We have had kindly greetings from the Boys in Blue—who were on the other side—and call on those of the Gray who may be disposed and able to assist us. We have determined to hold a grand Fair in this city for the purpose indicated in May next, or as soon as we can, and would be grateful for such contributions of money or merchandise as will make our efforts a success. Please make prompt reply if you can help us. With soldierly greetings, we are, Your old comrade Confeds, R. H. Fox, J. B. Mckenny, D. S. Redford, J. T. Ferriter, W. T. Ashby, Committee. the Mercer cavalry, from Spotsy
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Blue and the Gray. (search)
With purpose strong as love of life- Some fought in Blue and some in Gray. Each deemed his cause both true and just, And bravely strove to wiay; And of the hosts who bit the dust, Some fell in Blue and some in Gray. Where flowers bloom in southern vales, Where waters dash in crystae hills are fanned by northern gales, Some sleep in Blue and some in Gray. On mansion and on cottage wall, Hang the dead heroes of the fray, Whose mute lips answer not the call Of comrades wearing Blue and Gray. And out from homes both South and North, The orphaned children bend thay; And widowed mothers issue forth, To drop their tears on Blue and Gray. Over the dead the same sun throws His warm, benignant, peaceful swmoonlight pales and dew-drops kiss The moss-grown graves of Blue and Gray. Ye living, bring your garlands fair, And clasp your hands anew to-iving, bring your garlands fair, And clasp your hands anew to-day! One flag yet floats upon the air; We're brothers still, both Blue and Gray!
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our heroic dead. (search)
heroes who died for you and me— Each valiant man, in his own degree, Whether he fell on the shore or sea, Did deeds of which This Land, though rich In histories may boast, And the Sage's Book and the Poet's Lay Are full of the deeds of the Men in Gray. No lion cleft from the rock is ours, Such as Lucerne displays, Our only wealth is in tears and flowers, And words of reverend praise. And the Roses brought to this silent Yard Are Red and White. Behold! They tell how wars for a kingly crown, In s, that when battles cease The ramparts smile in the blooms of peace. And flowers to-day were hither brought From the gallant men who against us fought; York and Lancaster!—Gray and Blue! Each to itself and the other true!— And so I say Our Men in Gray Have left to the South and North a tale Which none of the glories of Earth can pale. Norfolk has names in the sleeping host Which fill us with mournful pride— Taylor and Newton, we well may boast, McPhail, and Walke, and Selden, too, Brave as th