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rifled cannon at a short distance, for our guns would be fired three or four times to their once. But it must be admitted that some of their batteries were fired with the precision, almost, of a rifle at one hundred yards' distance. There was a constant struggle during the day over the enemy's batteries. Time and again were they captured by our men, and very often retaken by the enemy. The most excited creature on the battle field was the Rev. Mr. Repetto, Captain of the Page Co. (Va.) Grays, who claimed the honor of taking Rickett's (Sherman's) battery. Of his whole company, nearly one hundred strong, he had only eighteen uninjured. Another of our reverends, Colonel Pendleton, a graduate of West Point, a resident of Lexington, Virginia, and an Episcopalian minister, was quite busy during the day, and doubtless did more than any one else to check the advancing enemy. The inquiry among the prisoners was very general, Who commanded that battery on the left that killed so many o
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The balloons with the army of the Potomac: a personal reminiscence by Professor T. S. C. Lowe, who introduced and made balloon observations on the Peninsula for the Union army. (search)
he occasion and suggested that we send out and gather silk dresses in the Confederacy and make a balloon. It was done, and we soon had a great patchwork ship of many varied hues which was ready for use in the Seven Days campaign. We had no gas except in Richmond, and it was the custom to inflate the balloon there, tie it securely to an engine, and run it down the York River Railroad to any point at which we desired to send it up. One day it was on a steamer down on the James River, when the tide went out and left the vessel and balloon high and dry on a bar. The Federals gathered it in, and with it the last silk dress in the Confederacy. This capture was the meanest trick of the war and one that I have never yet forgiven. One of the boy soldiers Charles F. Mosby, a Confederate drummer-boy who enlisted at the age of thirteen and served from 1861 to 1865 throughout the War, first with the Elliott Grays of the sixth Virginia infantry and later with Henderson's Heavy Artillery.
Chapter 7: Confederate armies and generals Confederates of 1861. At the birth of the Southern Army, when Guards, Grays, and Rifles abounded—these are the Pelican Rifles of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, later merged into the Seventh Louisiana Volunteers which suffered the heaviest loss of any Confederate regiment engaged in the fight at Port Republic, June 9, 1862. The armies of the Confederate States The permanent Constitution of the Confederate States of America provided that the President should be commander-in-chief of the army and navy, and of the militia of the several States when called into actual service. Accordingly, in any consideration of the Confederate army, the part played by President Davis must be borne in mind; also the fact that he previously had seen service in the United States army and that he had been Secretary of War of the United States. As Secretaries of War in the Confederate States Government there were associated with President Davis, the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of a Confederate soldier. (search)
Tennessee volunteers arrived at Randolph. There are now about three thousand troops stationed here under the command of General Jno. L. T. Sneed. May 24th, 1861.--To-night we sleep on our arms, ready to meet the foe at a moment's notice. Captain James Hamilton, of the Southern guards, dined with me to-day. May 25th.--Beautiful day. Pleasant drill at noon. Summoned to go on picket duty. A detachment of the Memphis light Dragoons, arrived this evening amid the cheers of the Bluff City Grays, and the Hickory Rifles. Sunday, May 26th.--No sleep last night, as I was Corporal of the guard, and could not, with my sense of a soldier's duty, sleep between watch. Spent the night walking from post to post. Read a chapter from the gospel of Matthew this morning. Have been very negligent of my religious duties, owing to the publicity of camp life, but hope by the grace of God to be more careful in the future. A Christian should never be ashamed to be found upon his knees. This eve
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Political parties in the United States. (search)
umps. Ku-klux Klan. Ku-klux Klan. Loco-foco. Loco-foco. Readjusters, 1878. A division of the Democratic party in Virginia advocating the funding of the State debt at 3 per cent.; under the leadership of General Mahone. Silver Grays. Silver Grays. Stalwarts. A branch of the Republican party, followers of Conkling, Cameron, and Logan, opposed to the reconciling course of President Hayes towards the South. Favored the nomination of Grant for a third term. Opposers othe funding of the State debt at 3 per cent.; under the leadership of General Mahone. Silver Grays. Silver Grays. Stalwarts. A branch of the Republican party, followers of Conkling, Cameron, and Logan, opposed to the reconciling course of President Hayes towards the South. Favored the nomination of Grant for a third term. Opposers of Blaine, etc. Tammany. Tammany. Woman's rights Belva Lockwood constituted herself a candidate for President in 1876. Polk, James Knox
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Silver Grays, (search)
Silver Grays, A term applied to the Whigs of New York who supported the administration of President Fillmore, and regarded the slavery question settled by the compromise of 1850. A convention of the administration was held at Syracuse, Sept. 27, 1850, to secure a vindication of the President's policy, etc. The convention resulted in an emphatic majority against the administration; whereupon the chairman, Mr. Granger, and several other administration men, left the convention; as they were inistration of President Fillmore, and regarded the slavery question settled by the compromise of 1850. A convention of the administration was held at Syracuse, Sept. 27, 1850, to secure a vindication of the President's policy, etc. The convention resulted in an emphatic majority against the administration; whereupon the chairman, Mr. Granger, and several other administration men, left the convention; as they were elderly men, they, with their following, were immediately dubbed Silver Grays.
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: Marylanders enlist, and organize to defend Virginia and the Confederacy. (search)
children shrilled it at their play, and for a week all the power of the provost-marshal and the garrison and the detectives could not still the refrain— The despot's heel is on thy shore, Maryland! His torch is at thy temple door, Maryland! for it was in the hearts of the people and it was true! The rendezvous of the drilled volunteers produced three crack companies under Capt. E. R. Dorsey, Baltimore City Guards; Capt. Wm. H. Murray, Maryland Guards, and Capt. J. Lyle Clarke, Independent Grays. And soon after was organized another company under Capt. Michael Stone Robertson, of Charles county, whose company came from the counties of St. Mary's, Calvert and Charles. These Richmond companies were mustered into the service of Virginia, May 17th and 18th and June 17th. Captain Clarke elected to take his company into the Twenty-first Virginia regiment. It served its year with great eclat and was the crack company of that part of the army. The other three were united to the battali
ing went on rapidly in the populous counties bordering on the Missouri river, and volunteers, organized and unorganized, poured into the capital in a steady stream. On the day General Price was appointed commander more than a thousand were gathered at Jefferson City, waiting to be mustered into the State Guard and take the field against the enemy. Capt. Robert Mc-Culloch brought several companies from Cooper county, and Capt. D. H. McIntire several from Callaway county. The Independence Grays came from Jackson county, and brought with them the four brass 6-pounders taken from the arsenal at Liberty. Capt. Jo Kelly's company of Irishmen, sent up from St. Louis in charge of the arms bought by Quartermaster-General James Harding, was still there. The first regiment organized was composed of eight companies from the counties close around Jefferson City. It was designated the First regiment of Rifles, and John S. Marmaduke was chosen to command it. Marmaduke was born in Missouri, a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ost intense anxiety was manifested among all classes of citizens. About 7 o'clock in the evening the following order was sent to me: [order no. 24.] headquarters first brigade, first division, L. M., New Orleans, January 9, 1861. To Captain Walton, Washington Artillery: You will repair immediately to the foot of Canal street, in conformity to orders from headquarters, there to receive the reports and assume command of the following named companies: Washington Artillery, Louisiana Grays, Louisiana Guards, Chasseurs-a-Pied, Sarsfield Rifles, Orleans Cadets. You will report the command, when formed, to the Adjutant General for further orders. Strict order and discipline will be enforced by you, in accordance with the rules and regulations of war now in force in the army of the United States. By order of Brigadier-General E. L. Tracy. Thomas F. Walker, Brigade Inspector. Pursuant to further orders, shortly after 2 o'clock in the morning of the 10th of January, th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. (search)
ost intense anxiety was manifested among all classes of citizens. About 7 o'clock in the evening the following order was sent to me: [order no. 24.] headquarters first brigade, first division, L. M., New Orleans, January 9, 1861. To Captain Walton, Washington Artillery: You will repair immediately to the foot of Canal street, in conformity to orders from headquarters, there to receive the reports and assume command of the following named companies: Washington Artillery, Louisiana Grays, Louisiana Guards, Chasseurs-a-Pied, Sarsfield Rifles, Orleans Cadets. You will report the command, when formed, to the Adjutant General for further orders. Strict order and discipline will be enforced by you, in accordance with the rules and regulations of war now in force in the army of the United States. By order of Brigadier-General E. L. Tracy. Thomas F. Walker, Brigade Inspector. Pursuant to further orders, shortly after 2 o'clock in the morning of the 10th of January, th
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