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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
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he ten twelve-pounder howitzers in his possession, spiked them. He had received orders to remove the pieces to Fort Leavenworth, but thought it unsafe to do so in the distracted state of the country. Threats had been made to take them from him.--N. Y. Sun, May 14. The Second Regiment of Connecticut Volunteers, Colonel Terry, embarked from New Haven for Washington on the steamer Cahawba. They marched down Chapel street, escorted by a large body of citizens, cavalry, a body of old New Haven Grays, and by the Emmet Guard-making a very fine appearance. The whole city was alive with people, and the route of the procession was a grand array of flags.--N. Y. Evening Post, May 11. The London News publishes an interesting article on the difficulties in the United States, and endeavors to indicate the position which the States under Jefferson Davis now occupy with relation to those under President Lincoln, and the status which both portions of the country now hold with relation to
ho have informed Secretary Cameron of its arrival, and that it is at the disposition of the Government. Each one of the guns bears the following inscription: From loyal Americans in Europe, to the United States Government, 1861. Mr. R. G. Moulton, an American at present residing in Manchester, deserves great credit for his energetic efforts in raising funds for the purchase of this battery.--N. Y. Times, May 24. One of the secession flags displayed from the Headquarters of the Grays, at Alexandria, Va., and within sight from Washington, was captured by two adventurous Union men-William McSpedon, of New York city, and Samuel Smith, of Queens County, N. Y. Gen. Patterson and staff arrived at Fort McHenry, Baltimore. Col. Vosburgh, late of the 71st N. Y. regiment, was buried in Greenwood Cemetery, L. I.--N. Y. Times, May 24. The Third Connecticut Regiment arrived at Washington. It numbers over eight hundred men, all well drilled, and is commanded by Colonel J.