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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 12, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Petersburg Grays or search for Petersburg Grays in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
perhaps as some others, but each regiment made a creditable showing, and their movements were very soldierly. The Fourth regiment came first, and was commanded by Colonel H. C. Hudgins. There were ten companies in all, two of which marched as one, and about 380 men. The companies were: Old Dominion Guard, of Portsmouth, Captain J. M. Binford, 41 men; Lee Rifles, of Norfolk, Captain George W. Taylor, 37 men; Old Dominion Light Infantry, of Smithfield, Captain E. A. Morrison, 26 men; Petersburg Grays, Captain F. R. Lassiter, 43 men; Nottoway Grays, Captain J. M. Harris, 24 men; Farmville Guard, Captain W. S. Paulett, 23 men; Portsmouth Rifles, Captain W. C. Williams, 43 men; City Guard, of Norfolk, Captain H. Hodges, 36 men. The ambulance corps—Dr. Bilisoly, surgeon—accompanied the regiment. Captain Pigg commanded the Third regiment, which was headed by the Alexandria drum corps, and the companies: Alexandria Light Infantry, Captain G. A. Mushback, 36 men; Culpeper Minute-Men, Ca
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The unveiling. [Richmond Dispatch, June 10, 1890.] (search)
he unveiling. [Richmond Dispatch, June 10, 1890.] Petersburg, June 9th, 1890. At an early hour in the afternoon crowds began to wend their way to the cemetery, all bearing flowers and evergreens with which to decorate the graves of the soldiers. The procession was one of the finest ever seen in Petersburg. It was composed of A. P. Hill Camp of veterans, Pickett-Buchanan Camp of Norfolk, R. E. Lee Camp and Sons of Confederate Veterans of Richmond, the Prince George Cavalry, Petersburg Grays, Petersburg Artillery with full battery of guns, the Fire Department with engines beautifully decorated, civil societies, and a long line of citizens. The line was headed by Chief-Marshal Henry and his associates, the ladies of the Memorial Association and the orator of the day, with the Mayor and Miss Hill. It was fully half-past 6 o'clock before the ceremonies commenced in the cemetery, where fully 10,000 people had assembled around the monument and the stand. The scene was an insp
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Valuable war relic. (search)
s genuine. It will be deposited with the State Librarian for preservation. Reverend Frank J. Boggs is the man who is mentioned as Major of the Twelfth Battalion of Light Artillery. At the time the war broke out he was a member of the Virginia Methodist Conference, and was in charge of Union Station Methodist Episcopal Church on Church Hill, in this city. The Richmond Grays, of the First Regiment of Virginia, had its full complement of men, and a company of infantry, called the Second Grays, was organized, and Rev. Mr. Boggs was elected captain of the company. He made a brave and efficient officer, and after the battle of Manassas, resigned his rank in the infantry to accept the command of the Twelfth Battalion of Light Artillery. The battalions of artillery on field duty with army corps were known by the name of their commanders—such as Cutshaw, Brander, Poague, Pegram and others, and heavy artillery was represented by numbers —Battalion Twelve was really infantry supporting