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in these last twenty years, and have been made, by Sewards, Greeleys, Beechers, &c., &c., to suck in the hydrogen gas of madness under the name of liberty. Thus their votes have been secured for their infamous Republican party. But Seward and Greeley split. Seward wished to keep them in order, Greeley (insane himself) turned them loose on Seward, made them put Soulouque Lincoln on the throne, and compelled Seward to act as his Prince of Marmalade. Now, what next? The wind bloweth where itGreeley (insane himself) turned them loose on Seward, made them put Soulouque Lincoln on the throne, and compelled Seward to act as his Prince of Marmalade. Now, what next? The wind bloweth where it listeth. But there is a God over all. And, certainly, He has thus far been with us. The wealth of the North, great nominally, is on the surface of the earth. Cities, machineshops, railroads, ships, stocks, &c., &c. It has no vitality — no power of production, but what labor gives it. But there, as everywhere, all seek to avoid the sweat of the brow, and prefer to labor with the brain rather than with the muscles. Hence their cultivated ingenuity. Hence the credit system, the banks and b
d not have been at pains to do so. They would but have fallen before an indignant constituency, and men would have been sent to their places whose minds could never change. Nor, in fact, have they been without their use. As the conflict was irrepressible; as they were urged on by an inexorable power, it was important we should know it. Our own political leaders refused to realize the fact. The zealots of the North alone could force the recognition; and I am bound to own that Giddings, and Greeley, and Seward, and Lincoln, parasites as they are, panderers to popular taste as they are, the instruments, and the mere instruments, of aggression, have done more to rouse us to the vindication of our rights than the bravest and the best among us. Such, then, was the nature of this contest. It was inevitable. It was inaugurated with the Government. It began at the beginning, and almost at the start the chances of the game were turned against us. If the foreign slave trade had never bee