Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Greeley or search for Greeley in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Greeley in a good Humor. The New York Tribune has a Christmas article congratulating the country upon the peaceful manner in which the heroes of the war (on either side) have betaken themselves to the ordinary pursuits of life. The allusions to the Southern soldiers speak well for Mr. Greeley's liberality of feeling. Here are some of them: "Look at that vast multitude of routed, beaten, discomfited men, whose valor has almost atoned for the sins of rebellion!" "Our gallant grey brMr. Greeley's liberality of feeling. Here are some of them: "Look at that vast multitude of routed, beaten, discomfited men, whose valor has almost atoned for the sins of rebellion!" "Our gallant grey brothers are even now clamoring around Washington," &c. "So with the Generals of the Rebellion. The greatest of them all is now a teacher of mathematics in a university. Sherman's great antagonists are in the express and railroad business. The once-dreaded Beauregard will sell you a ticket from New Orleans to Jackson; and, if you want to send a couple of hams to a friend in Richmond, Joe Johnston, once commander of great armies, will carry them. The man whose works Grant moved upon at Donelso
eral of the New England Republican newspapers disclaim any responsibility for Mr. Sumner's white-washing speech — among them the Hartford Courant, warmly. The issue joined. We have the programme announced simultaneously at New York by Mr. Greeley, and at Washington by General Banks, that the coercive power of the Government is to be exercised upon the Southern States until they shall concede the elective franchise to the negro. We may regard the issue [between these men and President Johnson] as fairly joined after these announcements. Henceforth the policy of conciliation towards the President by Mr. Greeley, and those whom he represents, means that conciliation which shall constrain the President to abandon the bulwarks of the Constitution, for the defence of which he has arrayed himself; and it does not at all mean a conciliation which looks to any abatement of their demands.--Sun. Reconstruction. The Provisional Governor of Florida will be ordered to surrender