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ed Tory predilections subjected him to considerable inconvenience during the Revolution. By a humble submission, however, and a promise of good behavior, as well as by the recommendation of a committee on his behalf, he was permitted to remain, and his property escaped confiscation. In the latter part of his life he resided in Lancaster, where his habits of self-indulgence became more inveterate, and he d. by suicide, 29 or 30 Ap. 1818. 11. William, s. of Isaac (9), m. Ruth, dau. of Benjamin Green of Groton, and had Esther Rand, b. I Mar. 1789, d. 17 Mar. 1805; Elizabeth Woods, b. 23 Jan. 1791; Sarah Goodwin, b. 13 Feb. 1793; Ruth Keep, b. 10 Mar. 1795; 32 William King, b. 19 Sept. 1797; Louisa Chandler, b. 29 Jan. 1800. William the f. was a blacksmith, but thriftless, and of unsteady habits. He sold his share of the homestead in 1794, and was a public charge, with his family, in 1807. He d. in the almshouse, 26 Aug. 1817, a. 63. Bradshaw, Humphrey (elsewhere written Bradsh
ed Tory predilections subjected him to considerable inconvenience during the Revolution. By a humble submission, however, and a promise of good behavior, as well as by the recommendation of a committee on his behalf, he was permitted to remain, and his property escaped confiscation. In the latter part of his life he resided in Lancaster, where his habits of self-indulgence became more inveterate, and he d. by suicide, 29 or 30 Ap. 1818. 11. William, s. of Isaac (9), m. Ruth, dau. of Benjamin Green of Groton, and had Esther Rand, b. I Mar. 1789, d. 17 Mar. 1805; Elizabeth Woods, b. 23 Jan. 1791; Sarah Goodwin, b. 13 Feb. 1793; Ruth Keep, b. 10 Mar. 1795; 32 William King, b. 19 Sept. 1797; Louisa Chandler, b. 29 Jan. 1800. William the f. was a blacksmith, but thriftless, and of unsteady habits. He sold his share of the homestead in 1794, and was a public charge, with his family, in 1807. He d. in the almshouse, 26 Aug. 1817, a. 63. Bradshaw, Humphrey (elsewhere written Bradsh
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 7: 1834-1837: Aet. 27-30. (search)
, with the plates. I also gave a notice of the work in the April number of the Journal The American Journal of Science and Arts. (this present month), and republished Mr. Bakewell's account of your visit to Mr. Mantell's museum. In Boston I made some little efforts in behalf of your work, and have the pleasure of naming as follows:— Harvard University, Cambridge (Cambridge is only four miles from Boston), by Hon. Josiah Quincy, President. Boston Athenaeum, by its Librarian. Benjamin Green, Esq., President of the Boston Natural History Society. I shall make application to some other institutions or individuals, but do not venture to promise anything more than my best exertions . . . . Agassiz little dreamed, as he read this letter, how familiar these far-off localities would become to him, or how often, in after years, he would traverse by day and by night the four miles which lay between Boston and his home in Cambridge. Agassiz still sought and received, as we
A Relic. --Among the numerous articles secured by the Virginia volunteers from the fleeing braggarts at the battle of Great Bethel, we have been shown a child's history of the United States, on the fly-leaf of which appears the following inscription: "Mr Benjamin Greens Book 3. Regiment Knew York" Over the coat of arms of Virginia, in the same book, is written in pencil, that "so must all rebels Di." We copy verbatim et literatim. The book was taken from a haversack picked up on the battle ground, soon after the engagement, and was evidently the property of Benjamin Green, of the 3d Regiment New York volunteers.
in advance, and came up with the enemy's pickets about 4 o'clock, which they drove in with little resistance. Pushing on, until they arrived at the place of Mr. Ben. Green, they came up with the enemy's main body, who were dismounted and in line of battle to receive them. Before the battalion was fully aware of the proximity ofCapt. Albert Ellery, in command of company C, Departmental battalion, was instantly killed about 7 o'clock Tuesday night, in the last charge wish the enemy made at Green's farm. The ball cut through his right jacket sleeve, entered about the centre of his right breast and passed entirely through his body, coming out of his left si said that a squad of his men had been out foraging, and had presented him with the articles as his portion of their captures. Mr. Henry Austin, who lives near Ben. Green's, on his return home on Tuesday night, captured three prisoners, which he brought to this city, and deposited at Libby prison. Mrs. Patterson Allan. T
The Daily Dispatch: January 30, 1865., [Electronic resource], Religious duties of masters to slaves. (search)
trary to law, was remanded to the enrolling officer. The case of Carter, slave of Franklin Stearns, charged with stealing a box of tobacco, valued at six hundred dollars, the property of Christian & Lea, was continued till to-day. Jesse, slave of William H. Jones, charged with stealing a parcel of meat, was discharged, there being no evidence to convict him of the offence. Willis, slave of James Taylor, was committed for going at large. Porter, alias Charles, slave of Benjamin Green, charged with stealing a pair of shoes from a negro girl in the employ of Mrs. McCarthy, was ordered to be whipped. A fine of fifty dollars was imposed upon H. Bruggomat for permitting his servant, Mary, to go at large. Samuel Schuyler was fined twenty dollars upon a similar charge. Peter Lawson was summoned to show cause why he should not be fined for selling light weight at his stall in the Second Market. On Saturday morning, a gentleman, named Smith, asked for a pound