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Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 7: master strokes. (search)
ill subscribe to form here an anti-slavery society. Mr. Greenleaf [Simon] also, will cordially come in, and I need not say he is one of the first [men] in the State, for his character is known. This quotation is made from a letter of General Samuel Fessenden, of Portland, Me., to Mr. Garrison, dated December 14. 1832. Among the remarkable minds which the Thoughts disillusioned in respect of the character and tendency of the Colonization Society were Theodore D. Weld, Elizur Wright, and Beriah Green, N. P. Rogers, William Goodell, Joshua Leavitt, Amos A. Phelps, Lewis Tappan, and James Miller McKim. Garrison's assertion that the overthrow of the Colonization Society was the overthrow of slavery itself, was, from the standpoint of a student of history, an exaggerated one. We know now that the claim was not founded on fact, that while they did stand together they did not fall together. But the position was, nevertheless, the strongest possible one for the anti-slavery movement to
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 9: agitation and repression. (search)
humiliation of a third refusal and must have listened with no little relief, to this blunt summary of the situation by Beriah Green, who was one of the six. If there is not timber amongst ourselves, quoth Green, big enough to make a president of, letGreen, big enough to make a president of, let us get along without one, or go home and stay there until we have grown up to be men. The next day Green was chosen, and established in a manner never to be forgotten by his associates that the convention did possess timber big enough to make a prGreen was chosen, and established in a manner never to be forgotten by his associates that the convention did possess timber big enough to make a president of. Narrow as were the circumstances of many of the members, the convention was by no means destitute of men of wealth and business prominence. Such were the Winslows, Isaac and Nathan, of Maine, Arnold Buffum, of Massachusetts, and Johnof the convention, culminated during the several readings of the Declaration of Sentiments. And when on the third day Beriah Green brought the congress to a close in a valedictory address of apostolic power and grandeur, and with a prayer so sweet,
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 10: between the acts. (search)
ruths to, masculine words. He protests against his condemnation by comparison. Every writer's style is his own — it may be smooth or rough, plain or obscure, simple or grand, feeble or strong, he contends, but principles are immutable. By his principles, therefore he would, be judged. Whittier, for instance,, he continues, is highly poetical, exuberant, and beautiful. Stuart is solemn, pungent, and severe. Wright is a thorough logician, dextrous, transparent, straightforward. Beriah Green is manly, eloquent, vigorous, devotional. May is persuasive, zealous, overflowing with the milk of human kindness. Cox is diffusive, sanguine, magnificent, grand. Bourne thunders and lightens. Phelps is one great, clear, infallible argumentdemonstration itself. Jocelyn is full of heavenlymindedness, and feels and speaks and acts with a zeal according to knowledge. Follen is chaste, profound, and elaborately polished. Goodell is perceptive, analytical, expert, and solid. Child (
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 14: brotherly love fails, and ideas abound. (search)
had been formed in the North every day for the last two years, and that in the single State of Ohio there were three hundred societies, one of which had a membership of four thousand names. The moral agitation was at its height. The National Society had hit upon a capital device for increasing the effectiveness of its agents and lecturers. This was to bring them together in New York for a few weeks' study of the slavery question under the direction of such masters as Theodore D. Weld, Beriah Green, Charles Stuart, and others. All possible phases of the great subject, such as, What is slavery? What is immediate emancipation? The consequences of emancipation to the South, etc., etc., pro-slavery objections and arguments were stated and answered. The agents and lecturers went forth from the convention bristling with facts, and glowing with enthusiasm to renew the crusade against slavery. Garrison, broken in health as he was, went on from Boston to attend this school of his discip